Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 370
Filter
1.
2.
Big Data ; 10(S1): S25-S29, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2151806

ABSTRACT

Achieving a modern equity-oriented public health system requires the development of a public health workforce with the skills and competencies needed to generate findings and integrate knowledge using diverse data. Yet current workforce capabilities and infrastructure are misaligned with what is needed to harness both new and older forms of data and to translate them into information that is equity contextualized. As with other articles in this supplement, this article builds from a literature review, environmental scan, and deliberations from the National Commission to Transform Public Health Data Systems. The article summarizes some of the challenges around current workforce capabilities and pipeline. The article identifies where the technology and data sectors can contribute skills, expertise, and assets in support of innovative workforce models and augment the development of public health workforce competencies.


Subject(s)
Health Workforce , Public Health , Technology , Workforce
3.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2136013

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to elucidate facilitators and barriers to health system resilience and resilient responses at local and regional levels during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic in Finland. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The authors utilized a qualitative research approach and conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 32) with study participants representing five different regions in Finland. Study participants were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling. All study participants had been in management and civil servant positions during the first year of the pandemic, representing municipalities, municipalities' social and healthcare services, hospital districts and regional state administrative agencies. All interviews were completed remotely from April to December 2021 and the recordings transcribed verbatim. The authors coded the transcripts in ATLAS.ti 9.1 using directed content analysis. FINDINGS: The findings highlighted a wide range of localized responses to the pandemic in Finland. Facilitators to health system resilience included active networks of cooperation, crisis anticipation, transitioning into crisis leadership mode, learning how to incorporate new modes of operation, as well as relying on the competencies and motivation of health workforce. The authors found several barriers to health system resilience, including fragmented organization and management particularly in settings where integrated health care systems were not in place, insufficient preparedness to a prolonged crisis, lack of reliable information regarding COVID-19, not having plans in place for crisis communication, pandemic fatigue, and outflux of health workforce to other positions with better compensation and working conditions. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Factors affecting health system resilience are often studied at the aggregate level of a nation. This study offers insights into what resilient responses look like from the perspective of local and regional actors in a decentralized health system. The results highlight that local capacities and context matter greatly for resilience. The authors call for more nuanced analyses on health systems and health system resilience at the sub-national level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Finland , Qualitative Research , Health Workforce
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 990353, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2123472

ABSTRACT

The global COVID-19 crisis exposed the critical need for a highly qualified public health workforce. This qualitative research aimed to examine public health workforce competencies needed to face COVID-19 challenges and identify the gaps between training programs and the competency demands of real-world disasters and pandemics. Through a sample of thirty-one participant qualitative interviews, we examined the perspectives of diverse stakeholders from lead public health organizations in Israel. Grounded Theory was used to analyze the data. Six themes emerged from the content analysis: public health workforce's low professional status and the uncertain future of the public health workforce; links between the community and Higher Education institutions; the centrality of communication competencies; need to improve health promotion; the role of leadership, management, and partnership, and innovation in public health coherence. Increasing the attractiveness of the profession, professional and financial support, and improving the working conditions to ensure a sustainable and resilient PH system were deemed necessary. This paper describes and cultivates new knowledge and leadership skills among public health professionals, and lays the groundwork for future public health leadership preparedness programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health/education , Qualitative Research
6.
N C Med J ; 83(6): 398-403, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111224

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 exposed and exacerbated the historical shortages and maldistribution of the health workforce in North Carolina. This edition of the North Carolina Medical Journal highlights the work being done in our state to address these needs, and calls for an intentional and persistent approach to planning for and developing the workforce needed to produce health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , North Carolina , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workforce , Health Workforce
7.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 51, 2022 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Timely knowledge mobilization has become increasingly critical during the COVID-19 pandemic and complicated by the need to establish or maintain lines of communication between researchers and decision-makers virtually. Our recent pan-Canadian research study on the mental health and substance use health (MHSUH) workforce during the pandemic identified key policy barriers impacting this essential workforce. To bridge the evidence-policy gap in addressing these barriers, we held a facilitated virtual policy dialogue. This paper discusses the insights generated at this virtual policy dialogue and highlights how this integrated knowledge mobilization strategy can help drive evidence-based policy in an increasingly digital world. METHODS: We held a 3-hour virtual policy dialogue with 46 stakeholders and policy decision-makers as the final phase in our year-long mixed-methods research study. The event was part of our integrated knowledge mobilization strategy and was designed to generate stakeholder-driven policy implications and priority actions based on our research findings. The data collected from the virtual policy dialogue included transcripts from the small-group breakout rooms and main sessions, reflective field notes and the final report from the external facilitator. Coded data were thematically analysed to inform our understanding of the prioritization of the policy implications and action items. RESULTS: Facilitated virtual policy dialogues generate rich qualitative insights that guide community-informed knowledge mobilization strategies and promote evidence-informed policy. Our policy dialogue identified actionable policy recommendations with equity as a cross-cutting theme. Adapting policy dialogues to virtual formats and including technology-assisted facilitation can offer advantages for equitable stakeholder participation, allow for deeper analysis and help build consensus regarding evidence-based policy priorities. CONCLUSIONS: Our facilitated virtual policy dialogue was a key knowledge mobilization strategy for our research on the capacity of the Canadian MHSUH workforce to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our policy dialogue allowed us to engage a diverse group of MHSUH workforce stakeholders in a meaningful action-oriented way, provided an avenue to get feedback on our research findings, and generated prioritized action items that incorporated the knowledge and experience of these MHSUH workforce stakeholders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Substance-Related Disorders , Canada , Health Policy , Health Workforce , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
10.
JAMA ; 328(16): 1639-1641, 2022 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2094108

ABSTRACT

This study examines changes in unemployment among US health care workers from January 2015 to April 2022, before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Health Workforce , Unemployment , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090136

ABSTRACT

This study examined the support for vaccine mandates and uptake among clinical and non-clinical staff at a tertiary hospital in northern Nigeria, focusing on variation of survey responses based on job position, socio-demographic characteristics, and perceived risk of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Using an explanatory, sequential, mixed-methods design and deploying a pragmatic paradigm, 370 healthcare workers were administered structured questionnaires. This was followed by in-depth interviews with a sub-sample of respondents to further clarify the responses regarding support for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine mandate. Findings demonstrated that less than one-half of respondents supported the COVID-19 mandate, and only one in three had received the recommended COVID-19 vaccine doses. Support for the vaccine mandate and vaccine uptake were predicted by profession, work experience, number of children, health status, and risk perception. Support for the vaccine mandate was ascribed to ethical and professional duty, whereas opposition was associated with respect for autonomy and human rights. This study documents the need to enhance support for vaccine mandates and uptake among healthcare workers through sustainable strategies, as Nigeria's healthcare workers are considered a source of trust and role models for the rest of society.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Health Workforce
12.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0276184, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089424

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although well-performing workforce is essential to equitable and efficient health service delivery, few countries have systematically addressed performance improvements. How health workers use their work time and what tasks they accomplish is here an important starting point. Therefore, a time motion study was conducted to assess the work time allocation patterns of primary health care doctors and nurses in two regions of Albania. METHODS: We used observation tool to record the time allocation along eight predefined main categories of activities. Conditional to presence at work, 48 health workers were continuously observed in early 2020 before start of the Covid-19 pandemic over five consecutive working days. RESULTS: The observed health workers spent 40.7% of their overall working time unproductively (36.8% on waiting for patients and 3.9% on breaks), 25.3% on service provision to users, 18.7% on administrative activities, 12.7% on outreach activities, 1.6% on continuous medical education and 1% on meetings. The study found variations in work time allocation patterns across cadres, with nurses spending more time unproductively, on administrative activities and on outreach and less on all other activities than doctors. Further, the work time allocation patterns were similar between urban and rural settings, except for nurses in rural settings spending less time than those in urban settings on administrative work. CONCLUSION: This study found that primary health care workers in Albania devote a substantial amount of work time to unproductive, service provision to users and administrative activities. Consequently, there is possibility for productivity, respectively efficiency gains in how health workers use their time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Albania , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Primary Health Care
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082130

ABSTRACT

The governmental public health workforce in the United States has faced staffing shortages for over a decade that have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. To assess this critical issue, the Region 2 Public Health Training Center collaborated with the New York State Association of County Health Officials to enumerate the city and county public health workforce in New York State. The organizations used an online survey to: (1) count employees and full-time equivalent (FTEs) staff in local health departments in 2021; (2) assess workforce trends since the COVID-19 pandemic; and, (3) identify challenges local health departments encounter in recruiting and retaining qualified public health workers. To assess trends, findings were compared with secondary data from 2019. Despite playing a central role in COVID-19 mitigation, local health departments experienced no overall increase in staffing in 2021 compared to 2019, with many health departments experiencing large increases in vacant positions. Recruitment challenges include noncompetitive salaries, difficulties finding qualified candidates, and lengthy hiring processes. This study complements accumulating evidence indicating that long-term investment in local public health infrastructure is needed to bolster the workforce and ensure that communities are protected from current and future health threats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , United States , Humans , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics , Workforce
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081873

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has sped up digital health transformation across the health sectors to enable innovative health service delivery. Such transformation relies on competent managers with the capacity to lead and manage. However, the health system has not adopted a holistic approach in addressing the health management workforce development needs, with many hurdles to overcome. The objectives of this paper are to present the findings of a three-step approach in understanding the current hurdles in developing a health management workforce that can enable and maximize the benefits of digital health transformation, and to explore ways of overcoming such hurdles. METHODS: A three-step, systematic approach was undertaken, including an Australian digital health policy documentary analysis, an Australian health service management postgraduate program analysis, and a scoping review of international literatures. RESULTS: The main findings of the three-step approach confirmed the strategies required in developing a digitally enabled health management workforce and efforts in enabling managers in leading and managing in the digital health space. CONCLUSIONS: With the ever-changing landscape of digital health, leading and managing in times of system transformation requires a holistic approach to develop the necessary health management workforce capabilities and system-wide capacity. The proposed framework, for overall health management workforce development in the digital health era, suggests that national collaboration is necessary to articulate a more coordinated, consistent, and coherent set of policy guidelines and the system, policy, educational, and professional organizational enablers that drive a digital health focused approach across all the healthcare sectors, in a coordinated and contextual manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Health Workforce
16.
Cien Saude Colet ; 27(11): 4131-4144, 2022 Nov.
Article in Portuguese, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079847

ABSTRACT

Studies show that people in vulnerable conditions and some social groups such as women and black people have suffered more intensely from the COVID-19 pandemic impacts. This expression of inequality also manifests itself among healthcare workers, with greater exposure of some specific groups. This paper analyzes the effect of COVID-19 on health care workers and the working conditions in the Brazilian public health system, analyzed from professional, gender, and race perspectives. Data were collected from an online survey of 1,829 health workers conducted in March 2021. Indeed, we identified inequalities in health workers' experiences during the health crisis generated by COVID-19, which are marked by the profession of each worker and are traversed by their gender and race traits.


Estudos mostram que pessoas em condições de vulnerabilidade têm sofrido de forma mais intensa os impactos da pandemia de COVID-19, assim como alguns grupos sociais, como mulheres e negros. Essa expressão de desigualdade também se manifesta entre os trabalhadores da saúde, com maior exposição de alguns grupos específicos. Este artigo analisa a incidência da COVID-19 sobre os trabalhadores da saúde a partir das perspectivas de profissão, gênero e raça. Os dados foram coletados por uma survey online com 1.829 trabalhadores da saúde, realizada no mês de março de 2021. Encontramos que, efetivamente, há desigualdades nas experiências dos trabalhadores da saúde durante a crise sanitária gerada pela COVID-19. Essas desigualdades estão marcadas pela profissão de cada trabalhador e são atravessadas por suas características de gênero e raça.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Health Workforce
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071422

ABSTRACT

The public health workforce has been instrumental in protecting residents against population health threats. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance of the public health workforce and exposed gaps in the workforce. Public health practitioners nationwide are still coming to understand these gaps, impacts, and lessons learned from the pandemic. This study aimed to explore Minnesota's local public health practitioners' perceptions of public health workforce gaps, the impacts of these workforce gaps, and the lessons learned in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted seven concurrent focus groups with members of the Local Public Health Association of Minnesota (LPHA; n = 55) using a semi-structured focus group guide and a survey of the local agencies (n = 70/72 respondents, 97% response rate). Focus group recordings were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using deductive and inductive coding (in vivo coding, descriptive coding), followed by thematic analysis. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive analyses and were integrated with the qualitative data. Participants indicated experiencing many workforce gaps, workforce gaps impacts, and described improvement strategies. Overall, many of the workforce gaps and impacts resulting from COVID-19 discussed by practitioners in Minnesota are observed in other areas across the nation, making the findings relevant to public health workforce nationally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Pandemics , Workforce
18.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 117(10): 1547-1549, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056478
19.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(5): 429-442, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051647

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Adopting the protection motivation theory and self-determination theory as frameworks, the present study examined whether the mental well-being of health care workers is determined by a combination of COVID-19-related factors (exposure and resources), organizational factors, and individual and attitudinal factors. METHODS: The present study is based on Eurofound's Living, Working, and COVID-19 survey, and the fieldwork for this survey was performed via uncontrolled convenience sampling throughout June and July 2020 in the 27 European Union countries. This research utilized a subsample of 1824 health sector employees and 11,750 workers in the other service industries. Further, to meet the objectives of this study, different linear regression models are estimated. RESULTS: Despite the close contact of health care workers with COVID-19, we found that the risk of contracting the coronavirus does not explain their poor or high well-being. However, the availability of personal protection equipment and mistrust in the national health system contribute to well-being, along with other organizational (eg, job insecurity) and individual-attitudinal factors (eg, health and life satisfaction). CONCLUSIONS: The present study offers various valuable insights for health institutes, organizations, practitioners, and employers to combat COVID-19 and identify the determinants of the mental well-being of health care professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Health Workforce , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
20.
Health Secur ; 20(5): 387-393, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051221

ABSTRACT

Limited research is available on the COVID-19 response experiences of local, state, and federal public health workers in the United States. Although the response to COVID-19 is still presenting challenges to the public health workforce, public health systems must also begin to consider lessons learned that can be applied to future disasters. During July and August 2021, a random sample of participants from a cross-sectional study of the public health workforce was invited to participate in interviews to obtain information on the current state of public health operations, the ongoing response to the COVID-19 crisis, and takeaways for improving future preparedness and response planning. Interviews were transcribed and inductively coded to identify themes. Twenty-four initial interview invitations were sent, and random substitutions were made until thematic saturation was reached when 17 interviews were completed. Four thematic categories were identified, including challenges related to (1) ongoing lack of political support or policy guidance; (2) fluctuations in, and uncertainty about, future funding and associated requirements; (3) job expectations, including remote work and data-sharing capabilities; and (4) the mental health toll of sustained response and related burnout. As the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic continues in its third year, it is crucial to identify lessons learned that can inform future investment in order to sustain a public health workforce and a public health preparedness and response system that is resilient to future disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Health Workforce , Cross-Sectional Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL