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4.
JAMA ; 328(16): 1639-1641, 2022 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2094108

ABSTRACT

This study examines changes in unemployment among US health care workers from January 2015 to April 2022, before and after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Health Workforce , Unemployment , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data
5.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 106(1): 17-20, 2021 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703423

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic has affected the ability of health systems to provide essential services globally. The Darfur region, located in the western part of Sudan, has been largely devastated by the war that began in 2003 and has been drawing considerable attention from the international community. The war, which erupted as a result of environmental, political, and economic factors, has led to tragic outcomes. Collapsing health-care infrastructures, health workforce shortages, lack of storage facilities for medicines and medical products, and inadequate access to health services are some of the effects of the war. After Sudan received the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine through the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access facility, significant challenges have been implicated in the delivery, storage, and use of the vaccine in the Darfur region. Lack of vaccine storage and transportation facilities, vaccination hesitancy, inequity in the distribution to health facilities, and shortage of health-care professionals resulting from insecurity and instability have added an extra layer of burden on local authorities and their ability to manage COVID-19 vaccinations in the region adequately. Addressing the impact of COVID-19 requires an effectively managed vaccination program. In the face of current challenges in Darfur, ensuring a fully vaccinated population might remain far-fetched and improbable if meaningful efforts are not put in place by all stakeholders and actors to address some of the challenges identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Drug Storage/methods , Drug Storage/standards , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Refrigeration/standards , Sudan , Transportation/standards , Vaccination/trends , Vaccination Hesitancy/trends
7.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0260698, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637153

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, world is suffering from a respiratory disease names as COVID-19. This is a novel coronavirus (n-CoV), a new strain which has not been previously identified in humans and it has spread in more than 100 locations internationally due to which it is termed as "public health emergency of international concern" (PHEIC) by the World Health Organization So far, no study done as yet to assess whether the dental workforce is aware about the facts and myths related to Covid-19 awareness. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to analyze and compare the level of awareness about the facts and myths related to COVID-19 amongst faculty, dental students and prep year students of the College of Dentistry (COD) as part of an awareness campaign. METHODS: An awareness test about COVID-19 was designed using information from the World Health Organization's (WHO) Myth Busters Awareness webpage. The questionnaire was administrated online to faculty and students, of the College of Dentistry and preparatory year students who had applied for the admission to the dental college using a secure enterprise online assessment platform (Blackboard). The tests were administered over a period of three months from March to June 2020. A written informed consent was obtained. RESULTS: The online COVID-19 awareness test was administered to 810 participants, out of which 325 (40%) were prep year students, 429(53%%) were dental students, and 56 (7%) were faculty members. Analysis of the results showed that 86% of the Faculty were able to correctly identify the facts and the myths related to COVID-19 followed by 81% of the prep year students and 74% of the dental students. Preparatory year student's knowledge related to COVID-19 was found to be high when compared to dental students (26.47±4.27, 23.67±6.2). Student to faculty knowledge score did not differ significantly (p = 0.808). CONCLUSION: This study reports about a successful pilot test conducted to assess the perceived knowledge about facts and myths related to corona virus amongst the dental workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Schools, Dental , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Saudi Arabia , Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data
9.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(8): 1426-1430.e3, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616375

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A survey was conducted at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS) to evaluate current practice management strategies among AAHKS members. METHODS: An application was used by AAHKS members to answer both multiple-choice and yes or no questions. Specific questions were asked regarding the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on practice patterns. RESULTS: There was a dramatic acceleration in same day total joint arthroplasty with 85% of AAHKS members performing same day total joint arthroplasty. More AAHKS members remain in private practice (46%) than other practice types, whereas fee for service (34%) and relative value units (26%) are the major form of compensation. At the present time, 93% of practices are experiencing staffing shortages, and these shortages are having an impact on surgical volume. CONCLUSION: This survey elucidates the current practice patterns of AAHKS members. The pandemic has had a significant impact on some aspects of practice activity. Future surveys need to monitor changes in practice patterns over time.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Orthopedics , Practice Management , Ambulatory Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/economics , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/methods , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/economics , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/methods , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Care Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Orthopedics/economics , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Orthopedics/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Practice Management/economics , Practice Management/organization & administration , Practice Management/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/economics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/organization & administration , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Professional Practice/economics , Professional Practice/organization & administration , Professional Practice/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
14.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 70(2): 512-521, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480180

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To describe the growth and characteristics of the direct care health workforce, encompassing home health aides, personal care aides, nursing assistants, and orderlies and psychiatric aides from 2010 to 2019 in the United States. METHODS: Using nationally representative data from the 2010 to 2019 American Community Survey, we described the growth in the direct care health workforce overall and by type of direct care health worker. In addition, we examined the distribution of direct care workers by geographic region of the country, age categories, citizenship, world area of birth, income, health insurance status, and other characteristics. RESULTS: From 2010 to 2019, the number of direct care health workers in the United States per 10,000 individuals decreased slightly from 135.81 in 2010 to 133.78 in 2019. Personal care aides made up 42.1% of the direct care health workforce in 2019, followed by nursing assistants (39.5%) and home health aides (16.3%). In 2019, the number of direct care health workers who were not U.S. citizens accounted for roughly 10% of all workers in each year. The relative percentage of direct care health workers that were not a citizen of the United States was highest among home health aides (16.3%). Among workers born outside of the United States, the majority were from Latin America, followed by Asia. CONCLUSION: From 2010 to 2019, there was little growth in the direct care health workforce despite growing demand for direct care health workers. In the midst of the current and projected shortage of direct care health workers-particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, longer-term solutions to improve retention of direct care health workers and increase the supply of direct care health workers may be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Adult , Female , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/trends , Home Health Aides/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Long-Term Care , Male , Nursing Assistants/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Aides/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
15.
Med Care ; 59(Suppl 5): S420-S427, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410279

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly progressed throughout the United States, increased demand for health workers required health workforce data and tools to aid planning and response at local, state, and national levels. OBJECTIVE: We describe the development of 2 estimator tools designed to inform health workforce planning for COVID-19. RESEARCH DESIGN: We estimated supply and demand for intensivists, critical care nurses, hospitalists, respiratory therapists, and pharmacists, using Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation projections for COVID-19 hospital care and National Plan and Provider Enumeration System, Provider Enrollment Chain and Ownership System, American Hospital Association, and Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupation Employment Statistics for workforce supply. We estimated contact tracing workforce needs using Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 case counts and workload parameters based on expert advice. RESULTS: The State Hospital Workforce Deficit Estimator estimated the sufficiency of state hospital-based clinicians to meet projected COVID-19 demand. The Contact Tracing Workforce Estimator calculated the workforce needed based on the 14-day COVID-19 caseload at county, state, and the national level, allowing users to adjust workload parameters to reflect local contexts. CONCLUSIONS: The 2 estimators illustrate the value of integrating health workforce data and analysis with pandemic response planning. The many unknowns associated with COVID-19 required tools to be flexible, allowing users to change assumptions on number of contacts and work capacity. Data limitations were a challenge for both estimators, highlighting the need to invest in health workforce data and data infrastructure as part of future emergency preparedness planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Planning , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Regional Health Planning , Contact Tracing , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Workload
17.
JAAPA ; 34(8): 1-3, 2021 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328937

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic has been exceptionally disruptive to healthcare delivery, exposing the strengths and weaknesses of our healthcare system. Though systems will continue to improvise in the short term to provide essential patient care, thoughtful consideration should be given to a long-term approach to improve healthcare delivery. Policy makers, legislators, and healthcare system leaders have the opportunity to reflect on lessons learned during this time and update outdated and detrimental restrictions affecting healthcare providers who have been vital to the pandemic response. This article focuses on lessons learned about the use of physician assistants and NPs, who have been readily deployed during this time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Nurse Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Physician Assistants/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
18.
Healthc Q ; 24(2): 15-26, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323457

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the rapid surge in demand for critical supplies and public health efforts needed to guard against virus transmission have placed enormous pressure on health systems worldwide. These pressures and the uncertainty they have created have impacted the health workforce in a substantial way. This paper examines the relationship between health supply chain capacity and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Canada's health workforce. The findings of this research also highlight the impact of the pandemic on health workers, specifically the relationship between the health supply chain and the autonomy of the health workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Equipment and Supplies/supply & distribution , Health Workforce/organization & administration , Professional Autonomy , Canada/epidemiology , Decision Making, Organizational , Fear/psychology , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Resource Allocation/organization & administration , Uncertainty
20.
Ann Emerg Med ; 78(4): 487-499, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267588

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: We describe how the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected the economics of emergency department care (ED). METHODS: We conducted an observational study of 136 EDs from January 2019 to September 2020, using 2020-to-2019 3-week moving ratios for ED visits, complexity, revenue, and staffing expenses. We tabulated 2020-to-2019 staffing ratios and calculated hour and full-time-equivalent changes. RESULTS: Following the COVID-19 pandemic's onset, geriatric (age ≥65), adult (age 18 to 64), and pediatric (age <18) ED visits declined by 43%, 40%, and 73%, respectively, compared to 2019 visits and rose thereafter but remained below 2019 levels through September. Relative value units per visit rose by 8%, 9%, and 18%, respectively, compared to 2019, while ED admission rates rose by 32%. Both fell subsequently but remained above 2019 levels through September. Revenues dropped sharply early in the pandemic and rose gradually but remained below 2019 levels. In medium and large EDs, staffing and expenses were lowered with a lag, largely compensating for lower revenue at these sites, and barely at freestanding EDs. Staffing and expense reductions could not match revenue losses in smaller EDs. During the pandemic, emergency physician and advanced practice provider clinical hours and compensation fell 15% and 27%, respectively, corresponding to 174 lost physician and 193 lost advanced practice provider full-time-equivalent positions. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacted the economics of ED care, with large drops in overall and, in particular, low-acuity ED visits, necessitating reductions in clinical hours. Staffing cutbacks could not match reduced revenue at small EDs with minimum emergency physician coverage requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Emergency Service, Hospital/economics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital/economics , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , United States
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