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3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776227

ABSTRACT

The role of physical activity in improving overall aspects of health regardless of age is well documented. Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, preventive measures to limit airborne infection have been introduced, with people, especially older adults, advised to stay at home, thus increasing sedentary lifestyle and the risk of chronic diseases. As one of the few possible ways to stay active is home-based training, this review aims to provide evidence on alternative and feasible home-based activity programs as a tool to improve the fitness level in older adults, especially when preventive measures are needed to ensure isolation and limit interpersonal contacts. During quarantine, older adults, especially those with chronic diseases, are recommended to regularly exercise. Combined balance and muscle-strengthening training has proven to be particularly useful in limiting falls and mobility limitations. In addition, the use of virtual reality systems seems to be a potential strategy in remaining physically active, reducing physical inactivity time and significantly increasing the compliance of the older adults with physical activity programs. In conclusion, home-based programs induce improvements in physical functions in general and quality of life in older people with or without co-morbidities, and it can be considered in the future as one of the feasible and economic ways to increase physical well-being. This may be of unique importance in the setting of coronavirus disease 2019 enforced limitations in out-of-home activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise , Humans , Quality of Life , Quarantine
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 836558, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776040

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study aims to examine the mediation role of satisfaction with children on the association between contact with children (CCT) and healthy aging among middle-aged and older parents in China. Methods: Data from 9,575 parents over 45 years old were obtained from the 2018 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey. A multinomial logistic regression model was applied to measure the association between contact, satisfaction, and healthy aging with potential confounders controlled. We used the Sobel-Goodman Mediation test to analyze the mediation role of satisfaction on the association between types of CCT and healthy aging. Results: Parents with contact with adult children had higher satisfaction with children [for contact weekly (satisfied/unsatisfied): relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.44, CI = 1.92-3.10] and higher healthy aging [for contact weekly (Q5/Q1): RRR = 1.41, CI = 1.13-1.77]. Satisfaction was strongly related to healthy aging [for satisfied (Q5/Q1): RRR = 3.44, CI = 2.14-5.51], and mediated 19.05% of healthy aging for weekly contact (Sobel test z = 4.338; indirect role = 0.014, CI = 0.011-0.018; direct role = 0.061, CI = 0.029-0.094). Subgroup analysis further revealed that satisfaction with contact played a partial mediating role between monthly contact and healthy aging in female and rural groups. Conclusions: Monthly CCT is more appropriate for older parents. Satisfaction with children in older parents seems to act as a significant and partial mediator of the relationship between contact and healthy aging. The contribution of satisfaction to healthy aging could be important to be considered and promoted in women and rural older parents, independent of CCT.


Subject(s)
Healthy Aging , Aged , Child , China , Female , Humans , Mediation Analysis , Middle Aged , Parent-Child Relations , Parents , Personal Satisfaction
5.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(16)2021 Aug 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662696

ABSTRACT

Magnesium (Mg) is a pivotal and very complex component of healthy aging in the cardiovascular-muscle-bone triad. Low Mg levels and low Mg intake are common in the general aging population and are associated with poorer outcomes than higher levels, including vascular calcification, endothelial dysfunction, osteoporosis, or muscle dysfunction/sarcopenia. While Mg supplementation appears to reverse these processes and benefit the triad, more randomized clinical trials are needed. These will allow improvement of preventive and curative strategies and propose guidelines regarding the pharmaceutical forms and the dosages and durations of treatment in order to optimize and adapt Mg prescription for healthy aging and for older vulnerable persons with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Magnesium/metabolism , Osteoporosis/metabolism , Sarcopenia/metabolism , Aging/metabolism , Animals , Bone and Bones/metabolism , Healthy Aging/metabolism , Humans , Muscle Strength/physiology , Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism
6.
Aust Occup Ther J ; 69(1): 3-14, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604334

ABSTRACT

Our core professional values have been enduring and remarkably relevant to decades past and times present. Our values ensure the currency of our professional contribution, our resilience, readiness, and adaptability, to meet the challenges as we move into the next decade and beyond. In this Sylvia Docker lecture, I draw on my career experience from practice and academic research to examine this premise. The social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic gave us all a picture of what our clients experience in an enduring way and the challenges of maintaining healthy lifestyles, meaningful occupations, and life roles. One of the greatest population challenges of this century is healthy ageing and the impact that ageism has on health. We live in a society that is ageist, and such cultural thinking impacts our beliefs and expectations as it does for older adults themselves. As occupational therapists, we strive to maintain our relevance, and we drive transformational change through using research-informed evidence-based approaches and adopting enablement programmes that meet the needs of people who are ageing. While prominent in enablement and therapeutic approaches, we are not immune to ageism. Being exposed to ageist views throughout our lives means, we internalise these and believe that ageing is a process of decline. Such self-perceptions and stereotyping impact the health of older people and influence the choices we make in our everyday practice. There are examples of emerging evidence and approaches that will meet these challenges and ways to re-frame ageist thinking. Occupational therapy values of working with people's strengths, what they can do, indicates we are well placed to engage and provide leadership in moving societal views. Addressing ageism requires self-reflection and action in order to be part of changing the narrative on ageing.


Subject(s)
Ageism , COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Occupational Therapy , Aged , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Clin Nurs Res ; 31(1): 3-4, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592025
8.
Maturitas ; 157: 68-69, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587031
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542536

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the relative influence of age-differentiated leadership on healthy aging at work. Likewise, the age-conditional influence of age-differentiated leadership is understudied, and especially so in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a three-wave longitudinal study, we examined the role that age-differentiated leadership plays in the prediction of work ability, as measured three times over six months (n = 1130) during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany (i.e., December 2019, March 2020, and June 2020). The results suggest that although there were no systematic changes in work ability on average, there was notable within-person variability in work ability over time. Additionally, we find that a balanced approach to age-differentiated leadership that considers the needs of both older and younger employees matters most and complements the positive influence of leader-member exchange for predicting within-person variability in work ability. We also find that older employees' work ability benefits from an approach to age-differentiated leadership that considers older employee's needs, whereas younger employees' work ability especially benefits from leader-member exchange and a balanced approach to age-differentiated leadership. Overall, these results provide initial support for the idea that an age-differentiated approach to leadership is important when considering healthy aging at work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Humans , Infant , Leadership , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e046558, 2021 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501710

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Women living with HIV (WLWH) experience accelerated ageing and an increased risk of age-associated diseases earlier in life, compared with women without HIV. This is likely due to a combination of viral factors, gender differences, hormonal imbalance and psychosocial and structural conditions. This interdisciplinary cohort study aims to understand how biological, clinical and sociostructural determinants of health interact to modulate healthy ageing in WLWH. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The British Columbia Children and Women: AntiRetroviral therapy and Markers of Aging-Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CARMA-CHIWOS) Collaboration (BCC3) study will enrol WLWH (n=350) and sociodemographically matched HIV-negative women (n=350) living in British Columbia. A subset of BCC3 participants will be past participants of CARMA, n≥1000 women and children living with and without HIV, 2008-2018 and/or CHIWOS, n=1422 WLWH, 2013-2018. Over two study visits, we will collect biological specimens for virus serologies, hormones and biological markers as well as administer a survey capturing demographic and sociostructural-behavioural factors. Sociodemographics, comorbidities, number and type of chronic/latent viral infections and hormonal irregularities will be compared between the two groups. Their association with biological markers and psychostructural and sociostructural factors will be investigated through multivariable regression and structural equation modelling. Retrospective longitudinal analyses will be conducted on data from past CARMA/CHIWOS participants. As BCC3 aims to follow participants as they age, this protocol will focus on the first study visits. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has been approved by the University of British Columbia Children's and Women's Research Ethics Board (H19-00896). Results will be shared in peer-reviewed journals, conferences and at community events as well as at www.hivhearme.ca and @HIV_HEAR_me. WLWH are involved in study design, survey creation, participant recruitment, data collection and knowledge translation. A Community Advisory Board will advise the research team throughout the study.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Healthy Aging , British Columbia/epidemiology , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Retrospective Studies
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e051209, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495465

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The conceptualisation of healthy ageing phenotype (HAP) and the availability of a tentative panel for HAP biomarkers raise the need to test the efficacy of potential interventions to promote health in older adults. This study protocol reports the methodology for a 24-week programme to explore the holistic influence of the yoga-based intervention on the (bio)markers of HAP. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study is a two-armed, randomised waitlist controlled trial with blinded outcome assessors and multiple primary outcomes. We aim to recruit 250 subjects, aged 60-80 years from the residential communities and old age clubs in Bangalore city, India, who will undergo randomisation into intervention or control arms (1:1). The intervention will include a yoga-based programme tailored for the older adults, 1 hour per day for 6 days a week, spread for 24 weeks. Data would be collected at the baseline and post-intervention, the 24th week. The multiple primary outcomes of the study are the (bio)markers of HAP: glycated haemoglobin, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s for physiological and metabolic health; Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Trail Making Tests A and B for cognition; hand grip strength and gait speed for physical capability; loneliness for social well-being and WHO Quality of Life Instrument-Short Form for quality of life. The secondary outcomes include inflammatory markers, tumour necrosis factor-alpha receptor II, C reactive protein, interleukin 6 and serum Klotho levels. Analyses will be by intention-to-treat and the holistic impact of yoga on HAP will be assessed using global statistical test. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study is approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Swami Vivekananda Yoga Anusandhana Samsthana University, Bangalore (ID: RES/IEC-SVYASA/143/2019). Written informed consent will be obtained from each participant prior to inclusion. Results will be available through research articles and conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CTRI/2021/02/031373.


Subject(s)
Healthy Aging , Yoga , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Hand Strength , Health Promotion , Humans , India , Middle Aged , Phenotype , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
12.
Nurs Forum ; 57(2): 328-329, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494818
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470882

ABSTRACT

Most humans depend on sunlight exposure to satisfy their requirements for vitamin D3. However, the destruction of the ozone layer in the past few decades has increased the risk of skin aging and wrinkling caused by excessive exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, which may also promote the risk of skin cancer development. The promotion of public health recommendations to avoid sunlight exposure would reduce the risk of skin cancer, but it would also enhance the risk of vitamin D3 insufficiency/deficiency, which may cause disease development and progression. In addition, the ongoing global COVID-19 pandemic may further reduce sunlight exposure due to stay-at-home policies, resulting in difficulty in active and healthy aging. In this review article, we performed a literature search in PubMed and provided an overview of basic and clinical data regarding the impact of sunlight exposure and vitamin D3 on public health. We also discuss the potential mechanisms and clinical value of phototherapy with a full-spectrum light (notably blue, red, and near-infrared light) as an alternative to sunlight exposure, which may contribute to combating COVID-19 and promoting active and healthy aging in current aged/superaged societies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Skin Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Infrared Rays , Pandemics , Phototherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Sunlight , Ultraviolet Rays , Vitamin D
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463693

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, characterized by home confinement and other restrictive measures to reduce the spread of the infection, led to significant changes in people's habits and lifestyle. One of the most common problems is the worsening of sleep quality or quantity, which could have negative effects on psychological wellbeing, particularly in older adults. The purposes of the present literature review considering healthy aging subjects are (a) to examine the existing research on sleep alterations during the current pandemic and (b) to highlight possible relationships between sleep problems and psychological distress. A systematic search strategy was implemented according to PRISMA guidelines in the international literature online databases, up to 1 July 2021. After identification and screening phases, 11 articles were included in this review. The studies found possible associations between sleep problems and mood changes-particularly in terms of depression and anxiety. In addition, altered sleep patterns seemed to be related to changes in individual aspects, lifestyle, and attitudes adopted by older adults during the COVID-19 lockdown. Thus, the pandemic could affect the sleep and psychological wellbeing of the older population, even in healthy aging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Psychological Distress , Sleep Wake Disorders , Aged , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
15.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(9): 1076-1083, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432653

ABSTRACT

The World elderly population is expected to double before 2050. Unhealthy habits and unhealthy lifestyles are commonly associated with age-related diseases or their worsening. Modification in daily lifestyle and diet may help preventing age-related diseases onset and efficiently affecting their evolution, thus promoting the Healthy Aging process, concept recently coined to describe the disease-free aging process. This review highlights the role of nutrition science in promoting healthy aging. Since the Mediterranean Model demonstrated to be a useful style in supporting healthy aging, promotion of this correct lifestyle by health policies seems to be the best approach to achieve this target.


Subject(s)
Diet, Mediterranean , Healthy Aging , Aged , Diet , Health Status , Humans , Life Style
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409592

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Retirement is recognized as a factor influencing the ageing process. Today, virtual health coaching systems can play a pivotal role in supporting older adults' active and healthy ageing. This study wants to answer two research questions: (1) What are the user requirements of a virtual coach (VC) based on an Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) for motivating older adults in transition to retirement to adopt a healthy lifestyle? (2) How could a VC address the active and healthy ageing dimensions, even during COVID-19 times? METHODS: Two-wave focus-groups with 60 end-users aged 55 and over and 27 follow-up telephone interviews were carried out in Austria, Italy and the Netherlands in 2019-2020. Qualitative data were analysed by way of framework analysis. RESULTS: End-users suggest the VC should motivate older workers and retirees to practice physical activity, maintain social contacts and emotional well-being. The ECA should be reactive, customizable, expressive, sympathetic, not directive nor patronizing, with a pleasant and motivating language. The COVID-19 outbreak increased the users' need for functions boosting community relationships and promoting emotional well-being. CONCLUSIONS: the VC can address the active and healthy ageing paradigm by increasing the chances of doing low-cost healthy activities at any time and in any place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Mentoring , Aged , Humans , Retirement , SARS-CoV-2 , User-Centered Design
17.
Perspect Public Health ; 141(4): 202-203, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331916
18.
Front Public Health ; 9: 700279, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317261

ABSTRACT

The population aging in Europe imposes challenges to societies that require adaptations and responses at various levels to minimize impacts and figuring out opportunities. Portugal has been committed to the World Health Organization and European Union's values and policy frameworks concerning active and healthy aging. In 2017, an inter-ministerial working group developed the National Strategy for Active and Healthy Aging. In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic that exposed the vulnerabilities of older populations, the launch of the Decade of Healthy Aging 2021-2030 and its baseline report and the 2018 Active Aging Index Analytical Report may constitute an opportunity to strategically think about the aging of the population as a national purpose in Portugal and in the other European countries that face similar challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Aging , Europe , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Portugal/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Ann Neurol ; 90(3): 336-349, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293136

ABSTRACT

At present, resilience refers to a highly heterogeneous concept with ill-defined determinants, mechanisms, and outcomes. This call for action argues for the need to define resilience as a person-centered multidimensional metric, informed by a dynamic lifespan perspective and combining observational and interventional experimental studies to identify specific neural markers and correlated behavioral measures. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic highlights the urgent need of such an effort with the ultimate goal of defining a new vital sign, an individual index of resilience, as a life-long metric with the capacity to predict an individual's risk for disability in the face of a stressor, insult, injury, or disease. ANN NEUROL 2021;90:336-349.


Subject(s)
Brain/physiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Healthy Aging/physiology , Healthy Aging/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Humans
20.
Drugs Aging ; 38(6): 469-479, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279506

ABSTRACT

Over the last 50 years, the Indian population aged 50 years and above (older adults) has quadrupled and is expected to comprise 404 million people in 2036, representing 27% of the country's projected population. Consequently, the contribution of chronic disease to older adults' total burden of diseases in India is likely to escalate. Disease burden is notably amplified by immunosenescence, a deterioration of the immune system that develops with age, leading to increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases and other comorbidities. Older adults with infectious diseases have a higher incidence and likelihood of life-threatening comorbidities such as coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, stroke, myocardial infarction, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. Therefore, immunization of older adults through vaccination might greatly reduce the burden imposed by vaccine preventable infectious diseases in this population. Here, we review evidence relevant to the disease burden among adults aged ≥ 50 years in India, and existing vaccination recommendations. Furthermore, we suggest a set of routine vaccinations for healthy older adults in India. There is a clear mandate to recognize the contributions of older adults to society and embrace strategies promoting healthy aging, which is described by the World Health Organization as the process of developing and maintaining functional ability and well-being in older age. Increasing vaccination awareness and coverage among older adults is an important step in that direction for India.


Subject(s)
Healthy Aging , Activities of Daily Living , Aged , Humans , Immunization Programs , India/epidemiology , Vaccination
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