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1.
Asia Pac J Public Health ; 33(8): 847-853, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574345

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to investigate the association between adherence to healthy lifestyles (as measured by the healthy lifestyle index [HLI]) and depressive symptoms among staff members at a large national medical institution in Tokyo, Japan, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The study sample consisted of 1228 staff members aged between 21 and 73 years who participated in a cross-sectional survey conducted in July 2020. We constructed the HLI by assigning one point to each healthy lifestyle factor: normal body mass index, sufficient physical activity, non-smoking status, non-to-moderate alcohol consumption, and sufficient sleep duration. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for depressive symptoms were 1.00 (reference), 0.71, 0.66, and 0.56 for participants with HLI scores of 0 to 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. The present study suggests the role of healthy lifestyles in mental health among hospital staff working during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Healthy Lifestyle , Hospitals , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 587146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574304

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a fast spreading virus leading to the development of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). Severe and critical cases are characterized by damage to the respiratory system, endothelial inflammation, and multiple organ failure triggered by an excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines, culminating in the high number of deaths all over the world. Sedentarism induces worse, continuous, and progressive consequences to health. On the other hand, physical activity provides benefits to health and improves low-grade systemic inflammation. The aim of this review is to elucidate the effects of physical activity in physical fitness, immune defense, and its contribution to mitigate the severe inflammatory response mediated by SARS-CoV-2. Physical exercise is an effective therapeutic strategy to mitigate the consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this sense, studies have shown that acute physical exercise induces the production of myokines that are secreted in tissues and into the bloodstream, supporting its systemic modulatory effect. Therefore, maintaining physical activity influence balance the immune system and increases immune vigilance, and also might promote potent effects against the consequences of infectious diseases and chronic diseases associated with the development of severe forms of COVID-19. Protocols to maintain exercise practice are suggested and have been strongly established, such as home-based exercise (HBE) and outdoor-based exercise (OBE). In this regard, HBE might help to reduce levels of physical inactivity, bed rest, and sitting time, impacting on adherence to physical activity, promoting all the benefits related to exercise, and attracting patients in different stages of treatment for COVID-19. In parallel, OBE must improve health, but also prevent and mitigate COVID-19 severe outcomes in all populations. In conclusion, HBE or OBE models can be a potent strategy to mitigate the progress of infection, and a coadjutant therapy for COVID-19 at all ages and different chronic conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Exercise , Healthy Lifestyle , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sedentary Behavior , Animals , Home Care Services , Humans , Physical Fitness , Social Isolation
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 774678, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533725

ABSTRACT

Background: Health sciences students as future health care providers, can play a valuable role in protecting societies against the spread of COVID-19 through health promotion and lifestyle modification education. Therefore, proper education of these students is essential. Objective: This study sought to assess and measure the change of knowledge of health sciences students regarding healthy lifestyle promotion strategies during the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic, after participation in different types of online and social media educational programs. Methods: In order to serve the purpose of the study, a methodological research design was first used to ensure the validation of the developed scale; the COVID-19 Healthy Lifestyle Promotion Scale (COVID-19 HLPS). The study utilized a four-arm randomized control research design in which the participants were randomly assigned into one of four groups, (1) control group (placebo intervention), (2) brochure group, who received brochures relevant to healthy lifestyle promotion, (3) Instagram group, who received similar information but through Instagram posts, and (4) online interactive educational workshop group, who also received similar information through an online interactive educational workshop. Results: In total, 155 participants participated in the online and social media intervention programs. There was a significant improvement in the intervention groups in the total knowledge subscale of the healthy promotion strategies compared with the control group (p < 0.001). Overall, the workshop group was the most effective group (effect size = 1.54) followed by the Instagram group (effect size = 0.99) and then the brochure group (effect size = 0.91). Conclusions: In order to meet the challenges posed by this pandemic, the use of such online and social media interventions is essential and may be the key for health promotion during this pandemic. Health science students, as future health care professionals, can play a fundamental role during the COVID-19 pandemic in disseminating knowledge relevant to healthy lifestyle to their families and communities thus promoting healthy living and behavioral changes. We propose the development of research initiatives at both national and international levels targeting changes within health science curricula that can meet potential challenges of future pandemics, leading to advancement of health care services globally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
4.
5.
J UOEH ; 43(3): 341-348, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436363

ABSTRACT

This paper provides a picture of the observations made over three hundred years ago by Bernardino Ramazzini (1633-1714) in light of current topical issues ranging from health problems related to work and lifestyle habits to the current burdensome COVID-19 pandemic. The main aspects of his work consist of descriptions of disorders linked to environmental risks, suggestions for measures for risk protection, and recommendations for healthy living. This paper focuses on Ramazzini's most relevant achievements by (1) analyzing the episodes that stimulated the composition of his main work and highlighting some observations on which current epidemiological and toxicological studies are based; (2) reviewing his work showing not only the systematic descriptions of work-related illnesses caused by occupational factors but also his sound etiological and physiopathological contributions to the field of occupational lung diseases, breast cancer, and environmental disorders; and (3) remarking on his main observations in the fields of risk prevention and health promotion, also in the light of some highly topical issues related to unhealthy lifestyle habits and the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Promotion/history , Healthy Lifestyle , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/history , Occupational Health/history , Occupational Medicine/history , History, 17th Century , History, 18th Century , Humans , Life Style , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Risk
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(17)2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs), sometimes referred to as lifestyle diseases, are the most common cause of death and disability worldwide. Thus, healthcare professionals should be equipped with tools, knowledge, skills, and competencies in the newly distinguished field of lifestyle medicine. The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Polish version of the Healthy Lifestyle and Personal Control Questionnaire (HLPCQ). The Polish version of the HLPCQ would further provide Polish healthcare professionals with a useful and convenient tool for routine lifestyle assessment while giving HLPCQ novel use and potential for further research. METHODS: Before testing its psychometric properties, the HLPCQ was translated and adapted from the original Greek version into Polish. Subsequently, we tested the instrument's psychometric properties on a sample of 2433 participants. In addition, we tested the factorial validity of the HLPCQ using confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis. RESULTS: There were more female than male participants (91.78%). Most of them were middle-aged (30.40 ± 7.71), single (39.62%), and living with family (70.65%). In terms of residence, 1122 (46.12%) participants lived in cities with a population of over 500,000. In terms of reliability, the internal consistency of the Polish version and its domains is excellent. Cronbach's alpha for each of the domains of the scale ranged between 0.6 and 0.9. CONCLUSIONS: The Polish version of the Healthy Lifestyle and Personal Control Questionnaire (HLPCQ) has good characteristics of factorial validity and can be used in clinical practice and research.


Subject(s)
Healthy Lifestyle , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poland , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Ageing Res Rev ; 70: 101406, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1353794

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has pushed the medical system to its breaking point. While the virus does not discriminate, the elderly and those with comorbidities, including hypertension severe obesity, diabetes mellitus, coronary disease, pneumonia and dementia, are at a greater risk for adverse outcomes due to COVID-19. While many people navigate their new normal, the question of what the long-lasting effects of the pandemic may be, lingers. To investigate how vulnerable populations are affected by the pandemic, we focused on Alzheimer's disease, a vector to understanding how the virus has impacted AD progression and risk via aging. By assessing the effect of COVID-19 on AD patients, we explore genetics, metabolism, and lifestyle factors in both COVID-19 and Alzheimer's disease that can work synergistically to precipitate adverse outcomes. This article also discusses how age-related conditions and/or age-related comorbidities susceptible to COVID-19. We also discuss possible healthy lifestyle factors reduce and/or combat COVID-19 now and in the future.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , COVID-19 , Aged , Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Alzheimer Disease/prevention & control , Disease Progression , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(9): 2605-2611, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To analyze lifestyle habits and weight evolution during the COVID-19 pandemic-associated lockdown, in diabetes and overweight/obesity patients (body mass index (BMI) [25-29.9] and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively). METHODS AND RESULTS: We collected information on participants' characteristics and behavior regarding lifestyle before and during the lockdown, through the CoviDIAB web application, which is available freely for people with diabetes in France. We stratified the cohort according to BMI (≥25 kg/m2vs < 25 kg/m2) and examined the determinants of weight loss (WL), WL > 1 kg vs no-WL) in participants with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2, in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Of the 5280 participants (mean age, 52.5 years; men, 49%; diabetes, 100% by design), 69.5% were overweight or obese (mean BMI, 28.6 kg/m2 (6.1)). During the lockdown, patients often quit or decreased smoking; overweight/obese participants increased alcohol consumption less frequently as compared with normal BMI patients. In addition, overweight/obese patients were more likely to improve other healthy behaviors on a larger scale than patients with normal BMI: increased intake of fruits and vegetables, reduction of snacks intake, and reduction of total dietary intake. WL was observed in 18.9% of people with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2, whereas 28.6% of them gained weight. Lifestyle favorable changes characterized patients with WL. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of overweight/obese patients with diabetes seized the opportunity of lockdown to improve their lifestyle and to lose weight. Identifying those people may help clinicians to personalize practical advice in the case of a recurrent lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Healthy Lifestyle , Obesity/therapy , Risk Reduction Behavior , Weight Loss , Adult , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diet, Healthy , Exercise , Female , France/epidemiology , Habits , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritive Value , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Smoking Cessation , Time Factors , Weight Gain
10.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(Special Issue): 763-767, 2021 Jun.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335586

ABSTRACT

The article presents the results of a study aimed at identifying the problems of maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the study showed that not only people of older age groups are infected, but also young people with chronic diseases. Forced isolation, uncertainty of the future and stress have significantly worsened the physical, social and mental health of the population of all age groups. Therefore, people began to strengthen their own physical, social and psychological health, to carry out preventive health measures. The problems of maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic can be effectively solved by using an integrated approach to public health, jointly provided by state and public organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthy Lifestyle , Organizations, Nonprofit , Pandemics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
11.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302428

ABSTRACT

Harvest for Health is a home-based vegetable gardening intervention that pairs cancer survivors with Master Gardeners from the Cooperative Extension System. Initially developed and tested in Alabama, the program was adapted for the different climate, growing conditions, and population in New Mexico. This paper chronicles the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of "Southwest Harvest for Health". During the nine-month single-arm trial, 30 cancer survivor-Master Gardener dyads worked together to establish and maintain three seasonal gardens. Primary outcomes were accrual, retention, and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes were vegetable and fruit (V and F) intake, physical activity, and quality of life. Recruitment was diverse and robust, with 30 survivors of various cancers, aged 50-83, roughly one-third minority, and two-thirds females enrolled in just 60 days. Despite challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic, retention to the nine-month study was 100%, 93% reported "good-to-excellent" satisfaction, and 87% "would do it again." A median increase of 1.2 servings of V and F/day was documented. The adapted home-based vegetable gardening program was feasible, well-received, and resulted in increased V and F consumption among adult cancer survivors. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this program and to inform strategies to increase the successful implementation and further dissemination of this intervention.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors/education , Gardening/education , Horticultural Therapy/methods , Mentors , Vegetables , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Female , Healthy Lifestyle , Horticultural Therapy/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Mexico , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life
12.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e044236, 2021 07 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297972

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of depression in college students and determine how social support and healthy lifestyle factors are associated with depression in this population. DESIGN: A cross-sectional design. SETTING: A comprehensive university in Changsha, Hunan, South China. The study was conducted from May to June 2019. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 541 students at the comprehensive university. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Social Support Rating Scale and Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II (HPLP-II) were used to evaluate depression, social support and lifestyles, respectively, and analyse the mutual relationships among them. RESULTS: Among the 541 participants, 161 (29.8%) experienced depressive symptoms, and there were significant gender-related and academic discipline-related differences in self-rated depression. The average social support score was 38.06 (38.06±7.52). The average HPLP-II score was 71.09 (71.09±11.47). A monofactor analysis showed that depression was correlated with social support and a healthy lifestyle. As demonstrated by logistic regression analysis, being a woman (OR=2.613, 95% CI: 1.541 to 4.43), inadequate social support (OR=0.912, 95% CI: 0.877 to 0.948), poor nutrition (OR=0.87, 95% CI: 0.775 to 0.977) and lack of self-actualisation (OR=0.644, 95% CI: 0.572 to 0.724) were significantly correlated with depression. CONCLUSIONS: Owing to the high prevalence of depression among Chinese university students, educational institutions must take measures such as providing compulsory mental health education courses and improving the psychological counselling services available to students.


Subject(s)
Depression , Universities , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Life Style , Prevalence , Social Support , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e044977, 2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288390

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Worsened cardiometabolic profiles in youth with mental ill health have been associated with a number of modifiable lifestyle risk factors. It is becoming increasingly evident that clinical interventions need to be multimodal in focus to improve mental health symptoms and the physical health symptoms in this already at-risk cohort. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This 12-week pilot clinical trial examines the efficacy, feasibility and acceptability of an adjunctive online psychoeducation programme for improving cardiometabolic risk parameters and affective symptoms in a transdiagnostic sample of at least 44 young people aged 16-25 years presenting for mental healthcare for mood and/or psychotic syndromes (including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and psychosis). Individuals will be invited to participate in a pilot clinical trial for a structured online psychoeducation programme incorporating nutritional, physical activity, sleep-wake and healthy lifestyle information, delivered fortnightly over six online modules. Participants will undergo a series of assessments including: (1) self-report and clinician administered assessments determining mental health symptomatology; (2) fasting blood tests to assess cardiometabolic markers (fasting insulin, fasting glucose and blood lipids); (3) anthropometric assessments (height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure); and (4) sleep-wake behaviours and circadian rhythm assessments. Changes in scores for all cardiometabolic and affective measures will be assessed via paired samples t-tests, and correlations between change scores will be assessed via Pearson's or Spearman's correlations. Feasibility will be assessed via completion rates, and the acceptability of the programme will be assessed via programme satisfaction measures. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This pilot clinical trial has been approved by the Sydney Local Health District Research Ethics and Governance Office (X20-0228 & 2020/ETH01201). The results of this pilot clinical trial will be disseminated into the scientific and broader community through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations, social media and university websites. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) Number: ACTRN12620000772943, Date 28 August 2020.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Mental Health , Adolescent , Affective Symptoms , Australia , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans
14.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282545

ABSTRACT

In order to identify the status of salt-related knowledge and behavior of the residents who were active in WeChat software between 2019 and 2020, 10-day salt-related surveys were conducted in 2019 and 2020 based on the WeChat public platform of China Healthy Lifestyle for All Campaign. Distribution and scores of salt-related knowledge, salt reduction behavior and high-salt intake behavior between 2019 and 2020 were compared. Data of 2109 participants in 2019 and 12,732 participants in 2020 were left for analysis. Overall, 88.2% of participants in 2019 had a willingness to reduce the amount of cooking salt in their households, significantly lower than 90.2% in 2020 (p-value < 0.05). In 2019 and 2020, over 80% of the participants knew fine dried noodles contain salt, but less than 30% knew ice cream contains salt. Over 78% of participants chose 5 g or 6 g for the maximum daily salt intake of healthy adults, and about 98% of participants knew that excessive salt intake would increase the risk of hypertension in both years. The percentage of participants who used salt measuring spoons asked restaurants to use less salt, read the sodium content on the nutrition facts table, chose foods with low sodium content and regularly used low-sodium salt, were 36.1%, 45.0%, 44.1%, 40.3% and 35.8% in 2019, and the percentage increased significantly to 46.4%, 49.2%, 50.8%, 47.1% and 43.4% in 2020 (all p-value < 0.05). The percentage of people regularly eating pickled mustard tubers, salted vegetables and sauce foods or using high-salt condiments also increased from 2019 to 2020. The median of salt-related knowledge scores, salt reduction behavior scores and high-salt intake behavior scores were 11, 2, 5 points in 2019, and 10, 3, 5 points in 2020, respectively. Compared to 2019, the salt-related knowledge score was relatively lower, while the salt reduction behavior score and high-salt intake behavior score were relatively higher in 2020. Besides, the score of salt-related knowledge and behaviors differed in different gender, age and hypertension groups. The COVID-19 epidemic may have influenced the salt-related knowledge and behaviors status of WeChat users in China. Promotion and education of salt-related knowledge and online behavior intervention are still needed, particularly for male and hypertension patients in the future.


Subject(s)
Feeding Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mobile Applications , Sodium Chloride, Dietary/administration & dosage , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Cooking , Diet, Sodium-Restricted/methods , Female , Health Promotion/methods , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sodium Chloride, Dietary/adverse effects , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(7): 2173-2180, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279665

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Italy responded to the Covid-19 pandemic early by forcing the entire population into a 2-month domestic confinement. The aim of this study was to assess gender differences in the impact of lockdown on physical activity and lifestyle habits. METHODS AND RESULTS: A cross-sectional web-based survey was conducted in April 2020 on a general population sample residing in Italy. Participants completed validated questionnaires. Gender differences were assessed using a multivariable adjusted logistic regression model using gender as independent and exposures as dependent variables. Metabolic equivalents-hour/week was used to evaluate physical activity. A total of 2218 participants (761 men and 1457 women) agreed to participate in the study and completed the questionnaire. The survey found that women compared to men showed 1) a lower level of physical activity before the institution of lockdown, 2) a lower tendency to reduce physical activity levels during the lockdown, when gender differences in compliance with guideline recommendations for physical activity disappeared, 3) and a worsening of sleep and stool passage; men experienced an increase in alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Women, who previously had a lower level of physical activity than men, showed a lower tendency to reduce it during lockdown, revealing greater resilience than men. However, the worsening in sleep, in stool passage, and a trend to weight increase revealed signs of psychological suffering after a protracted lockdown period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Exercise , Healthy Lifestyle , Mental Health , Physical Distancing , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Defecation , Female , Habits , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Sex Factors , Sleep , Time Factors , Weight Gain , Young Adult
16.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(2): 102-111B, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261336

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine countries' engagement with the health impacts of climate change in their formal statements to intergovernmental organizations, and the factors driving engagement. Methods: We obtained the texts of countries' annual statements in United Nations (UN) general debates from 2000 to 2019 and their nationally determined contributions at the Paris Agreement in 2016. To measure countries' engagement, we used a keyword-in-context text search with relevant search terms to count the total number of references to the relationship of health to climate change. We used a machine learning model (random forest predictions) to identify the most important country-level predictors of engagement. The predictors included political and economic factors, health outcomes, climate change-related variables and membership of political negotiating groups in the UN. Findings: For both UN general debate statements and nationally determined contributions, low- and middle-income countries discussed the health impacts of climate change much more than did high-income countries. The most important predictors of engagement were health outcomes (infant mortality, maternal deaths, life expectancy), countries' income levels (gross domestic product per capita), and fossil fuel consumption. Membership of political negotiating groups (such as the Group of 77 and Small Island Developing States) was a less important predictor. Conclusion: Our analysis indicated a higher engagement in countries that carry the heaviest climate-related health burdens, but lack necessary resources to address the impacts of climate change. These countries are shouldering responsibility for reminding the global community of the implications of climate change for people's health.


Subject(s)
Climate Change , Healthy Lifestyle , Life Expectancy , Fossil Fuels , Gross Domestic Product , Humans , Infant , Infant Mortality , United Nations
17.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(4): 941-944, 2021 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254833

ABSTRACT

During this time of global health crisis, physical distancing, along with mask wearing, has emerged as the sine qua non social practice to protect ourselves and others from COVID-19. But as physical distancing ensues and all eyes remain fixed on the novel coronavirus, another, albeit careworn, pandemic rages on. Physical inactivity, the world's fourth leading cause of death, may indeed be exacerbated by physical distancing measures, such as sheltering at home and closing or limiting access to recreation and exercise facilities. The purpose of this paper is to urge public health and medical professionals not to forget the importance of physical activity to whole-person health, recognize the importance of physical activity as a potential COVID-19 mitigation strategy and to serve as advocates for promoting active lifestyles. It is imperative that the national call for physical distancing not be interpreted as a call for physical inactivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Healthy Lifestyle , Physical Distancing , Public Health , Sedentary Behavior , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Res Nurs Health ; 44(3): 418-419, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219764
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217072

ABSTRACT

The gripping coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has imposed dramatic changes to many areas of daily living in all sectors of society across the world. We examined the relationship between perceived stress and health behaviors among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online survey with measures of psychological stress, physical activity and exercise, and sleep and social connectedness was distributed in June and July of 2020. The survey was completed by 550 college students (mean age: 21.3 ± 3.8 years, 74.2% female, 94.4% Caucasian). Being female and unemployed and having a lower annual income were significantly associated with higher levels of stress. In addition, regression analysis found that reduced exercise and sleep during the COVID-19 pandemic significantly predicted the levels of stress of participants after controlling for gender, employment status, and annual income. University officials should aim to implement health-promotion strategies directed at preventing reductions in exercise and sleep duration, especially in those at greater risk of increased perceived stress such as females and economically disadvantaged students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Universities , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students , Young Adult
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