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2.
Ear Hear ; 43(3): 733-740, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788537

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study is a scoping review examining factors that affect consistent hearing aid use in young children with early identified hearing loss (HL). DESIGN: Online databases were used to identify journal articles published between 2009 and 2019, yielding over 1800 citations. The citations were uploaded into an online software product called Covidence that enables scoping/systematic review management. After duplicates were removed, 857 articles were screened by abstract and title name, 93 of which were put through for full-text screening. Twenty-five articles met predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Appraisal tools were utilized to establish the quality of the studies included. Numerical summaries were used to synthesize and describe the data set. Thematic analysis was utilized to identify global and subthemes within the data set. RESULTS: Numerical summaries revealed that over half of the studies in the data set used a quantitative design. Thematic analysis of the data identified four global themes namely, "each child is an individual," "parents are key," "parents require support," and "professionals make a difference." Each global theme was further divided into subthemes, most of which centered around the parents of children with HL. Each subtheme was categorized as a malleable or a fixed factor that impacts on hearing aid use in young children with HL. CONCLUSIONS: This scoping review identified malleable and fixed factors that impact on hearing aid use in young children with HL. These factors centered around the individual characteristics of children with HL, the key responsibility their parents have, and the important contribution that professionals can make. Irrespective of whether factors are malleable or fixed, parents and professionals working with children with HL can have a positive impact on hearing aid use. This is likely to have a flow on, positive impact on their overall communication and learning outcomes.


Subject(s)
Deafness , Hearing Aids , Hearing Loss , Child , Child, Preschool , Communication , Deafness/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/rehabilitation , Humans , Parents
3.
S Afr J Commun Disord ; 69(1): e1-e13, 2022 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776408

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  South Africa has a high burden of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DRTB) and until recently, ototoxic aminoglycosides were predominant in treatment regimens. Community-based ototoxicity monitoring programmes (OMPs) have been implemented for early detection of hearing loss and increased patient access. OBJECTIVES:  A longitudinal study was conducted to describe the service delivery characteristics of a community-based OMP for DRTB patients facilitated by CHWs as well as observed ototoxic hearing loss in this population. METHOD:  A descriptive retrospective record review of longitudinal ototoxicity monitoring of 194 DRTB patients undergoing treatment at community-based clinics in the city of Cape Town between 2013 and 2017. RESULTS:  Follow-up rates between consecutive monitoring assessments reached as high as 80.6% for patients assessed by CHWs. Few patients (14.2% - 32.6%) were assessed with the regularity (≥ 6 assessments) and frequency required for effective ototoxicity monitoring, with assessments conducted, on average, every 53.4-64.3 days. Following DRTB treatment, 51.5% of patients presented with a significant ototoxic shift meeting one or more of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) criteria. Deterioration in hearing thresholds was bilateral and most pronounced at high frequencies (4 kHz - 8 kHz). The presence of pre-existing hearing loss, human immunodeficiency virus co-infection and a history of noise exposure were significant predictors of ototoxicity in patients. CONCLUSION:  DRTB treatment with kanamycin resulted in significant deterioration of hearing longitudinally, predominantly at high frequencies. With ongoing training and supportive supervision, CHWs can facilitate community-based ototoxicity monitoring of DRTB patients. Current protocols and guidelines may require reassessment for appropriate community-based ototoxicity monitoring.


Subject(s)
Hearing Loss , Ototoxicity , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant , Hearing Loss/chemically induced , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Ototoxicity/etiology , Retrospective Studies , South Africa , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/drug therapy
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 751828, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775939

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Despite growing recognition of hearing loss as a risk factor for late life cognitive disorders, sex and gender analysis of this association has been limited. Elucidating this is one means to advocate for holistic medicine by considering the psychosocial attributes of people. With a composite Gender Score (GS), we aimed to assess this among aging participants (50+) from the 2016 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) cohort. Methods: The GS was derived from gender-related variables in HRS by factor analyses and logistic regression, ranging from 0 (toward masculinity) to 100 (toward femininity). GS tertiles were also used to indicate three gender types (GS tertile 1: lower GS indicates masculinity; GS tertile 2: middle GS indicates androgyny; GS tertile 3: higher GS indicates femininity). Univariate followed by multiple logistic regressions were used to estimate the Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of cognitive impairment (assessed by adapted Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status) from hearing acuity, as well as to explore the interactions of sex and gender with hearing acuity. The risk of cognitive impairment among hearing-impaired participants was assessed using multivariable models including sex and gender as exposure variables. Results: Five variables (taking risks, loneliness, housework, drinking, and depression) were retained to compute the GS for each participant. The distribution of GS between sexes partly overlapped. After adjusting for confounding factors, the OR for cognitive impairment associated with hearing impairment was significantly higher (OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.26, 2.15), and this association was not modified by female sex (OR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.27), but by androgynous gender (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.81). In the multivariable models for participants with hearing impairment, androgynous and feminine gender, as opposed to female sex, was associated with lower odds of cognitive impairment (OR of GS tertile 2 = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.84; OR of GS tertile 3 = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.87; OR of female sex = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.08). Conclusions: Hearing impairment was associated with cognitive impairment among older people, and this association may be attenuated by a more feminine GS.


Subject(s)
Hearing Loss , Aged , Cognition , Female , Femininity , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Retirement
5.
Cogn Res Princ Implic ; 7(1): 24, 2022 03 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753134

ABSTRACT

Face masks have become common protective measures in community and workplace environments to help reduce the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Face masks can make it difficult to hear and understand speech, particularly for people with hearing loss. An aim of our cross-sectional survey was to investigate the extent that face masks as a health and safety protective measure against SARS-CoV-2 have affected understanding speech in the day-to-day lives of adults with deafness or hearing loss, and identify possible strategies to improve communication accessibility. We analyzed closed- and open-ended survey responses of 656 adults who self-identified as D/deaf or hard of hearing. Over 80% of respondents reported difficulty with understanding others who wore face masks. The proportion of those experiencing difficulty increased with increasing hearing loss severity. Recommended practical supports to facilitate communication and social interaction included more widespread use of clear face masks to aid lip-reading; improved clarity in policy guidance on face masks; and greater public awareness and understanding about ways to more clearly communicate with adults with hearing loss while wearing face masks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Masks , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(2): e32581, 2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hearing loss affects 1 in 5 people worldwide and is estimated to affect 1 in 4 by 2050. Treatment relies on the accurate diagnosis of hearing loss; however, this first step is out of reach for >80% of those affected. Increasingly automated approaches are being developed for self-administered digital hearing assessments without the direct involvement of professionals. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide an overview of digital approaches in automated and machine learning assessments of hearing using pure-tone audiometry and to focus on the aspects related to accuracy, reliability, and time efficiency. This review is an extension of a 2013 systematic review. METHODS: A search across the electronic databases of PubMed, IEEE, and Web of Science was conducted to identify relevant reports from the peer-reviewed literature. Key information about each report's scope and details was collected to assess the commonalities among the approaches. RESULTS: A total of 56 reports from 2012 to June 2021 were included. From this selection, 27 unique automated approaches were identified. Machine learning approaches require fewer trials than conventional threshold-seeking approaches, and personal digital devices make assessments more affordable and accessible. Validity can be enhanced using digital technologies for quality surveillance, including noise monitoring and detecting inconclusive results. CONCLUSIONS: In the past 10 years, an increasing number of automated approaches have reported similar accuracy, reliability, and time efficiency as manual hearing assessments. New developments, including machine learning approaches, offer features, versatility, and cost-effectiveness beyond manual audiometry. Used within identified limitations, automated assessments using digital devices can support task-shifting, self-care, telehealth, and clinical care pathways.


Subject(s)
Hearing Loss , Hearing , Audiometry, Pure-Tone/methods , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/therapy , Humans , Machine Learning , Reproducibility of Results
7.
CMAJ ; 194(4): E112-E121, 2022 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disability-related considerations have largely been absent from the COVID-19 response, despite evidence that people with disabilities are at elevated risk for acquiring COVID-19. We evaluated clinical outcomes in patients who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 with a disability compared with patients without a disability. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study that included adults with COVID-19 who were admitted to hospital and discharged between Jan. 1, 2020, and Nov. 30, 2020, at 7 hospitals in Ontario, Canada. We compared in-hospital death, admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), hospital length of stay and unplanned 30-day readmission among patients with and without a physical disability, hearing or vision impairment, traumatic brain injury, or intellectual or developmental disability, overall and stratified by age (≤ 64 and ≥ 65 yr) using multivariable regression, controlling for sex, residence in a long-term care facility and comorbidity. RESULTS: Among 1279 admissions to hospital for COVID-19, 22.3% had a disability. We found that patients with a disability were more likely to die than those without a disability (28.1% v. 17.6%), had longer hospital stays (median 13.9 v. 7.8 d) and more readmissions (17.6% v. 7.9%), but had lower ICU admission rates (22.5% v. 28.3%). After adjustment, there were no statistically significant differences between those with and without disabilities for in-hospital death or admission to ICU. After adjustment, patients with a disability had longer hospital stays (rate ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.56) and greater risk of readmission (relative risk 1.77, 95% CI 1.14-2.75). In age-stratified analyses, we observed longer hospital stays among patients with a disability than in those without, in both younger and older subgroups; readmission risk was driven by younger patients with a disability. INTERPRETATION: Patients with a disability who were admitted to hospital with COVID-19 had longer stays and elevated readmission risk than those without disabilities. Disability-related needs should be addressed to support these patients in hospital and after discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Developmental Disabilities/epidemiology , Female , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders/epidemiology
8.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 53(2): 391-403, 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684139

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of switching from in-person assessment to virtual assessment during the COVID-19 pandemic on the growth trajectories of children with hearing loss who are learning spoken language. METHOD: Sixty-eight children with typical hearing, 44 children with cochlear implants, and 47 children with hearing aids were assessed with a norm-referenced measure of receptive vocabulary, a criterion-referenced measure of phonological awareness, and a criterion-referenced measure of conceptual print knowledge at least 4 times, at 6-month intervals, between the ages of 4 and 6 years. Of those participants, 26 children with typical hearing, 13 children with cochlear implants, and 13 children with hearing aids entered virtual testing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The slopes of growth for children who entered virtual testing were compared to their own slopes prepandemic and to the growth slopes of children who completed all testing in-person, prepandemic. RESULTS: Within-subject comparisons across all measures did not show a change in growth slopes prepandemic to postpandemic. For the measure of conceptual print knowledge, children who were tested during the pandemic showed slower overall growth than children who were tested prepandemic. No effects of hearing status were found across growth on any measure. CONCLUSION: These preliminary data support the use of virtual assessment to measure growth in receptive vocabulary, phonological awareness, and conceptual print knowledge in children with hearing loss learning spoken language.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cochlear Implantation , Cochlear Implants , Deafness , Hearing Aids , Hearing Loss , Child , Child, Preschool , Deafness/surgery , Humans , Language Development , Pandemics , Vocabulary
9.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(2): 103320, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631882

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 may have many nonspecific symptoms, such as hearing loss, tinnitus and dizziness. This study aims to investigate the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the hearing thresholds of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A total of 20 patients aged 20-55 years who were diagnosed with COVID-19 were included in this study. The relationship between the pure-tone thresholds of patients before and after COVID-19 was evaluated. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between bone conduction pure-tone thresholds in all frequencies before and after COVID-19. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 has no effects on the hearing thresholds in patients with non-hospitalized mild COVID-19 disease. Further studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the auditory system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Auditory Threshold , Hearing , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
10.
Acta Otolaryngol ; 142(1): 48-51, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612249

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: SARS-CoV-2 is known to be a neurotrophic virus. However, the effect of this virus on the hearing system is still uncertain. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the possible effect of COVID-19 on hearing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty healthcare workers who had COVID-19 after hearing evaluation with pure tone audiometry (PTA) for any reason in the last 1 year were included in the study. PTA and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE) tests were performed in 15 of 30 patients during the active infection period. For all 30 patients, otoscopic examination plus PTA and TEOAE tests were performed at the end of the first month after their treatment. RESULTS: When the PTA results of 30 patients (60 ears) before and after COVID-19 were compared, a significant decrease in hearing level was found only at 1000 Hz (p < .05). There were no significant differences at other frequencies. When the PTA and TEAOE test results of 15 patients (30 ears) that were performed during and after COVID-19 were compared, no significant differences were found. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that COVID-19 may cause hearing loss. However, this result needs to be confirmed with comprehensive studies to be conducted in larger patient groups.


Subject(s)
Auditory Threshold/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/virology , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous , Turkey , Young Adult
11.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e27599, 2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598927

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: eHealth and social media could be of particular benefit to adults with hearing impairment, but it is unknown whether their use of smart devices, apps, and social media is similar to that of the general population. OBJECTIVE: Our aim is to study whether adults with normal hearing and those with impaired hearing differ in their weekly use of smart devices, apps, and social media; reasons for using social media; and benefits from using social media. METHODS: We used data from a Dutch cohort, the National Longitudinal Study on Hearing. Data were collected from September 2016 to April 2020 using a web-based questionnaire and speech-in-noise test. The results from this test were used to categorize normal hearing and hearing impairment. Outcomes were compared using (multiple) logistic regression models. RESULTS: Adults with impaired hearing (n=384) did not differ from normal hearing adults (n=341) in their use of a smartphone or tablet. They were less likely to make use of social media apps on a smartphone, tablet, or smartwatch (age-adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.67, 95% CI 0.48-0.92; P=.02). Use of social media on all devices and use of other apps did not differ. Adults with hearing impairment were more likely to agree with using social media to stay in touch with family members (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.16-2.07; P=.003) and friends (age-adjusted OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.01-1.81; P=.046). Furthermore, they were more likely to agree with using social media to perform their work (age-adjusted OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.04-2.18; P=.03). There were no differences in the experienced benefits from social media. CONCLUSIONS: The potential for eHealth is confirmed because adults with hearing impairment are not less likely to use smart devices than their normal hearing peers. Adults with hearing impairment are less likely to use social media apps on a smart device but not less likely to use social media on all types of internet-connected devices. This warrants further research on the types of social media platforms that adults with hearing impairment use and on the type of device on which they prefer to use social media. Given that participants with hearing impairment are more likely than their normal hearing peers to use social media to perform their work, use of social media may be seen as an opportunity to enhance vocational rehabilitation services for persons with hearing impairment.


Subject(s)
Hearing Loss , Mobile Applications , Social Media , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Smartphone
12.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 52(3): 769-775, 2021 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1545676

ABSTRACT

Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated a quick shift to virtual speech-language services; however, only a small percentage of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) had previously engaged in telepractice. The purpose of this clinical tutorial is (a) to describe how the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition in Children with Hearing Loss study, a longitudinal study involving speech-language assessment with children with and without hearing loss, transitioned from in-person to virtual assessment and (b) to provide tips for optimizing virtual assessment procedures. Method We provide an overview of our decision making during the transition to virtual assessment. Additionally, we report on a pilot study that calculated test-retest reliability from in-person to virtual assessment for a subset of our preschool-age participants. Results Our pilot study revealed that most speech-language measures had high or adequate test-retest reliability when administered in a virtual environment. When low reliability occurred, generally the measures were timed. Conclusions Speech-language assessment can be conducted successfully in a virtual environment for preschool children with hearing loss. We provide suggestions for clinicians to consider when preparing for virtual assessment sessions. Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.14787834.


Subject(s)
Child Language , Education of Hearing Disabled , Educational Measurement/methods , Hearing Loss , Speech-Language Pathology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Educational Measurement/economics , Family , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Speech-Language Pathology/economics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/economics
13.
Aust J Prim Health ; 27(5): 371-376, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532230

ABSTRACT

Recommendations for hearing screening for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 4 years have a limited evidence base. Using the hearScreen™ (HearX, Camden, DE, USA) mobile health application as part of a mixed-methods study, the aim of this study was to assess the proportion of 4-year-old Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children with hearing difficulties, as well as the feasibility and acceptability of the test itself. Of the 145 4-year-old Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who were regular patients of the service during the recruitment period, 50 were recruited to the present study. Of these 50 children, 42 (84%) passed the hearing screening test, 4 (8%) did not and 4 (8%) were unable to complete the test. Nine caregivers were interviewed. Themes included the priority given to children's health by caregivers, positivity and trust in the test, preference for having the test conducted in primary care and the importance of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person providing the screening test. These findings lend support to hearing screening for school-age children in primary care provided by an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander healthcare worker using the hearScreen™ test.


Subject(s)
Health Services, Indigenous , Hearing Loss , Telemedicine , Child , Child, Preschool , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Humans , Primary Health Care
14.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): e1-e4, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Paediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) often manifests with hearing loss (HL). Given the impact of HL, early detection is critical to prevent its associated effects. Yet, the majority of children living with HIV/AIDS (CLWHA) cannot access hearing healthcare services because of the scarcity of audiologists and expensive costs of purchasing screening equipment. Alternative solutions for early detection of HL are therefore necessary. AIM: The overall aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using self-administered smartphone-based audiometry for early HL detection amongst CLWHA. SETTING: This study was conducted at the paediatrics department of a state hospital in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa. METHODS: This was a feasibility study conducted amongst twenty-seven (27) CLWHA who were in the age group of 6-12 years. The participants self-administered hearing screening tests using a smartphone-based audiometric test. The primary end-points of this study were to determine the sensitivity, specificity and test-retest reliability of self-administered hearing screening. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity for self-administered screening were 82% and 94%, respectively, with positive and negative predictive values of 90% and 88%, respectively. Moreover, a strong positive test-retest reliability (r = 0.97) was obtained when participants self-administered the screening test. CONCLUSION: Six- to 12-year-old CLWHA were able to accurately self-administer hearing screening tests using smartphone-based audiometry. These findings show that self-administered smartphone audiometry can be used for serial hearing monitoring in at-risk paediatric patients.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Hearing Loss , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Child , Feasibility Studies , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Smartphone
15.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(5): 1105-1107, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472092
16.
Lang Speech Hear Serv Sch ; 52(3): 889-898, 2021 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462048

ABSTRACT

Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic introduced new educational challenges for students, teachers, and caregivers due to the changed and varied learning environments, use of face masks, and social distancing requirements. These challenges are particularly pronounced for students with hearing loss who often require specific accommodations to allow for equal access to the curriculum. The purpose of this study was to document the potential difficulties that students with hearing loss faced during the pandemic and to generate recommendations to promote learning and engagement based on findings. Method A qualitative survey was designed to document the frequency of various learning situations (i.e., in person, remote virtual, and blended), examine the accessibility of technology and course content, and quantify hearing issues associated with safety measures and technology use in school-age students with hearing loss. Survey questions were informed from key educational issues reported in published articles and guidelines. The survey was completed by 416 educational personnel who work with students with hearing loss. Results Respondents indicated that most of their schools were providing remote or blended (in-person and remote) learning consisting of synchronous and asynchronous learning. Common accommodations for students with hearing loss were only provided some of the time with the exception of sign language interpreters, which were provided for almost all students who required them. According to the respondents, both students and caregivers reported issues or discomfort with the technology required for remote learning. Conclusion To ensure that students with hearing loss are provided equal access to the curriculum, additional accommodations should be considered to address issues arising from pandemic-related changes to school and learning practices including closed captioning, transcripts/notes, recordings of lectures, sign language interpreters, student check-ins, and family-directed resources to assist with technology issues.


Subject(s)
Education of Hearing Disabled , Hearing Loss , Learning , Teaching , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Curriculum , Humans , Male , Masks , Pandemics , Persons With Hearing Impairments , Schools , Students
17.
Med Pr ; 72(3): 321-325, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413233

ABSTRACT

In 2019, COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, evolved into a pandemic which is still going on. The basic clinical symptoms of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are: fever, dry cough, fatigue, muscle pain, respiratory problems, and the loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms, including those related to hearing and balance organs (hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness), are reported less frequently by patients. They are especially rarely reported as the first symptoms of this infection. In order to answer the question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can cause hearing and balance damage, the authors reviewed the literature sources from 2019-2020 included in EMBASE and PubMed, entering the following words: "hearing loss," "COVID-19," "coronavirus," "sensorineural hearing loss," "vertigo," and "dizziness." Ultimately, 9 studies on the possible relationship between hearing impairment and SARS-CoV-2, and 4 studies on the possible relationship between damage to the balance and SARS-CoV-2, were qualified for the study. The results of the analysis suggest a possible relationship between COVID-19 and hearing loss, with no evidence of a similar relationship between this virus and the balance system. The possible existence of such a relationship should be especially remembered by hospital emergency room doctors, otolaryngologists and audiologists, especially as regards the possibility of a sudden sensironeural hearing loss as the first symptom of COVID-19. This also applies to doctors of other specialties. The authors indicate the need for further, intensive and multifaceted research on this issue. Med Pr. 2021;72(3):321-5.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hearing Disorders/etiology , Hearing , Postural Balance , Vestibular Diseases/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Tinnitus/etiology , Vertigo/etiology , Young Adult
18.
Acta Med Okayama ; 75(4): 511-516, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405571

ABSTRACT

WHO has recommended various measures to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, including mask-wearing and physical distancing. However, these changes impair communication for individuals with hearing loss. We investigated the changes in auditory communication associated with COVID-19 measures in 269 patients (male: 45.7%, female: 54.3%, median age: 54 y.o.). Most patients with hearing loss had difficulty engaging in auditory communication with people wearing masks, especially in noisy surroundings or with physical distanc-ing. These difficulties were noticeable in patients with severe hearing loss. Developing communication support strategies for people with hearing loss is an urgent need while COVID-19 measures are in place.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Hearing Loss/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Masks , Middle Aged
19.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 21(4): e380-e383, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1357648

ABSTRACT

One in five people in the UK are deaf, with hearing loss affecting more than 70% of people over the age of 70. Despite this being a higher prevalence than asthma, heart disease or diabetes, deaf people experience persistent health inequalities with poorer experiences and outcomes in disease prevention and management. Clear communication and patient engagement with health are key to better outcomes. Nonetheless, there exist cultural, educational and organisational barriers when addressing communication with patients with hearing loss.Foundation doctors have regular and prolonged contact with their patients, and often feel underprepared when interacting with patients with hearing loss. This article aims to highlight these communication barriers and suggest changes for improvement.Improvement will require adaptations from both individual and organisational perspectives, with patient care as a clear focus for change.


Subject(s)
Deafness , Hearing Loss , Communication , Communication Barriers , Deafness/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans
20.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(10): e14684, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334468

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Meaningfully grouping individuals with tinnitus who share a common characteristics (ie, subgrouping, phenotyping) may help tailor interventions to certain tinnitus subgroups and hence reduce outcome variability. The purpose of this study was to test if the presence of tinnitus subgroups are discernible based on hearing-related comorbidities, and to identify predictors of tinnitus severity for each subgroup identified. METHODS: An exploratory cross-sectional study was used. The study was nested within an online survey distributed worldwide to investigate tinnitus experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. The main outcome measure was the tinnitus Handicap Inventory- Screening Version. RESULTS: From the 3400 respondents, 2980 were eligible adults with tinnitus with an average age of 58 years (SD = 14.7) and 49% (n = 1457) being female. A three-cluster solution identified distinct subgroups, namely, those with tinnitus-only (n = 1306; 44%), those presenting with tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss and/or misophonia (n = 795; 27%), and those with tinnitus and hearing loss (n = 879; 29%). Those with tinnitus and hyperacusis reported the highest tinnitus severity (M = 20.3; SD = 10.5) and those with tinnitus and no hearing loss had the lowest tinnitus severity (M = 15.7; SD = 10.4). Younger age and the presence of mental health problems predicted greater tinnitus severity for all groups (ß ≤ -0.1, P ≤ .016). CONCLUSION: Further exploration of these potential subtypes are needed in both further research and clinical practice by initially triaging tinnitus patients prior to their clinical appointments based on the presence of hearing-related comorbidities. Unique management pathways and interventions could be tailored for each tinnitus subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Tinnitus , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hearing , Hearing Loss/complications , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tinnitus/epidemiology
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