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1.
BMC Res Notes ; 15(1): 228, 2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910347

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Hearing loss is an important public health problem. Its causes vary, including infections, noise, and aging. The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic occurred in April 2020 in Japan. During the pandemic, people were urged to stay at home and drastically changed their lifestyles. This study aimed to examine hearing loss before and during the pandemic. The prevalence during the pandemic after April 2020 was compared for the period in 2019. Study subjects were those who received health checkups in both periods. Hearing loss was defined as a hearing threshold of > 30 dB at 1 kHz and > 40 dB at 4 kHz in either ear using pure-tone audiometry. RESULTS: A total of 2367 persons presented in both 2019 and 2020. The overall rates of hearing loss were 9.5% and 13.2% before and after the pandemic, respectively. After controlling for age, sex, current smoking, regular exercise and alcohol consumption, the rate of hearing loss showed a significant increase in 2020 (p = < 0.0001). With age stratification, an increase was observed in the participants aged < 40 years (1.3% vs. 3.1%, p < 0.001) and 40-59 years (7.2% vs. 12.6%, p < 0.001). Further studies are needed to confirm the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on hearing loss.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Aging , Audiometry, Pure-Tone/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(3): 103428, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1773092

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: It is thought that COVID-19 may cause hearing loss, but its effects on the hearing system are not clear. This study aimed to reveal the effects of COVID-19 on the auditory system by using various audiological measurement methods in individuals diagnosed with COVID-19. METHODS: Thirty individuals between the ages of 18-45, who were diagnosed with COVID-19 by PCR at least one month ago, and had no pre-COVID-19 hearing loss complaints, constituted the test group. Thirty individuals aged between 18 and 30 years and who had no history of hearing loss constituted the control group. Audiological evaluations of all participants were made with pure-tone audiometry, high-frequency audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE), distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), and auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements. RESULTS: A significant difference was found between the groups at all high frequencies between 4 and 14 kHz (p < 0.05). TEOAE amplitudes at 1500 Hz, 2000 Hz and 4000 Hz frequencies and DPOAE amplitudes at 4003 Hz and higher frequencies were significantly lower in the test group (p < 0.05). While there was a significant difference between the I, III and V absolute latencies between the groups (p < 0.05), there was no significant difference between the I-III, III-V and I-V interpeak latencies (p > 0.05) as a result of the ABR test. CONCLUSION: This study showed that COVID-19 can cause cochlear damage, especially at high frequencies. More studies are needed to determine the effects of COVID-19 on the auditory system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deafness , Hearing Loss , Adolescent , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Auditory Threshold/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous/physiology , Young Adult
4.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(2): 103320, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631882

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 may have many nonspecific symptoms, such as hearing loss, tinnitus and dizziness. This study aims to investigate the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the hearing thresholds of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A total of 20 patients aged 20-55 years who were diagnosed with COVID-19 were included in this study. The relationship between the pure-tone thresholds of patients before and after COVID-19 was evaluated. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between bone conduction pure-tone thresholds in all frequencies before and after COVID-19. CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 has no effects on the hearing thresholds in patients with non-hospitalized mild COVID-19 disease. Further studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the auditory system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Auditory Threshold , Hearing , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
5.
Med Pr ; 72(3): 321-325, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413233

ABSTRACT

In 2019, COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, evolved into a pandemic which is still going on. The basic clinical symptoms of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are: fever, dry cough, fatigue, muscle pain, respiratory problems, and the loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms, including those related to hearing and balance organs (hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness), are reported less frequently by patients. They are especially rarely reported as the first symptoms of this infection. In order to answer the question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can cause hearing and balance damage, the authors reviewed the literature sources from 2019-2020 included in EMBASE and PubMed, entering the following words: "hearing loss," "COVID-19," "coronavirus," "sensorineural hearing loss," "vertigo," and "dizziness." Ultimately, 9 studies on the possible relationship between hearing impairment and SARS-CoV-2, and 4 studies on the possible relationship between damage to the balance and SARS-CoV-2, were qualified for the study. The results of the analysis suggest a possible relationship between COVID-19 and hearing loss, with no evidence of a similar relationship between this virus and the balance system. The possible existence of such a relationship should be especially remembered by hospital emergency room doctors, otolaryngologists and audiologists, especially as regards the possibility of a sudden sensironeural hearing loss as the first symptom of COVID-19. This also applies to doctors of other specialties. The authors indicate the need for further, intensive and multifaceted research on this issue. Med Pr. 2021;72(3):321-5.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hearing Disorders/etiology , Hearing , Postural Balance , Vestibular Diseases/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Tinnitus/etiology , Vertigo/etiology , Young Adult
7.
Med Pr ; 72(3): 321-325, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175785

ABSTRACT

In 2019, COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, evolved into a pandemic which is still going on. The basic clinical symptoms of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are: fever, dry cough, fatigue, muscle pain, respiratory problems, and the loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms, including those related to hearing and balance organs (hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness), are reported less frequently by patients. They are especially rarely reported as the first symptoms of this infection. In order to answer the question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can cause hearing and balance damage, the authors reviewed the literature sources from 2019-2020 included in EMBASE and PubMed, entering the following words: "hearing loss," "COVID-19," "coronavirus," "sensorineural hearing loss," "vertigo," and "dizziness." Ultimately, 9 studies on the possible relationship between hearing impairment and SARS-CoV-2, and 4 studies on the possible relationship between damage to the balance and SARS-CoV-2, were qualified for the study. The results of the analysis suggest a possible relationship between COVID-19 and hearing loss, with no evidence of a similar relationship between this virus and the balance system. The possible existence of such a relationship should be especially remembered by hospital emergency room doctors, otolaryngologists and audiologists, especially as regards the possibility of a sudden sensironeural hearing loss as the first symptom of COVID-19. This also applies to doctors of other specialties. The authors indicate the need for further, intensive and multifaceted research on this issue. Med Pr. 2021;72(3):321-5.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hearing Disorders/etiology , Hearing , Postural Balance , Vestibular Diseases/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Tinnitus/etiology , Vertigo/etiology , Young Adult
10.
Front Public Health ; 8: 252, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613347

ABSTRACT

At this time of the COVID-19 pandemic, potentially effective treatments are currently under urgent investigation. Benefits of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19 infection have been proposed and clinical trials are underway. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, typically used for the treatment of malaria and autoimmune diseases, have been considered for off-label use in several countries. In the literature, there are reports of ototoxic effects of the drugs causing damage to the inner ear structures, which then result in hearing loss, tinnitus, and/or imbalance. This mini-review represents a summary of the findings from a systematic search regarding ototoxicity of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in the published literature. The characteristics of sensorineural hearing loss and/or tinnitus after chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine treatment can be temporary but reports of persistent auditory and vestibular dysfunction exist. These are not frequent, but the impact can be substantial. Additionally, abnormal cochleovestibular development in the newborn was also reported after chloroquine treatment in pregnant women. The suggested dose of chloroquine for COVID-19 infection is considerably higher than the usual dosage for malaria treatment; therefore, it is plausible that the ototoxic effects will be greater. There are potential implications from this review for survivors of COVID-19 treated with chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine. Patient reports of hearing loss, tinnitus, or imbalance should be noted. Those with troublesome hearing loss, tinnitus and/or imbalance are encouraged to be referred for hearing evaluation and interventions once they are stable. Clinical trials of chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine should also consider including audiological monitoring in the protocol.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Chloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Ototoxicity/complications , Emergencies , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Tinnitus/etiology
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