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1.
Int J Infect Dis ; 115: 215-216, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561567
2.
Vestn Otorinolaringol ; 86(5): 28-34, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518846

ABSTRACT

The information about hearing status of patients who have had a COVID-19 is scattered. There are no studies among children population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate hearing function in children after coronavirus infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 87 children aged from 5 months to 17 years who have had a new coronavirus infection were examined in three cities of Russia (St. Petersburg, Novosibirsk and Surgut). Audiologic examination depended on the age and included: otoscopy, TEOAE and DPOAE, ABR, impedansometry, pure tone audiometry, speech audiometry in quiet and noise. Fisher, LittlEARS and PEACH questionnaires were used as well. An evaluation of central auditory processing was performed in case of indications. RESULTS: In 80 children (92%) otoscopy didn't revealed any problems. All children had type A tympanogram. Acoustic reflex was registered in 49 children (56%), wasn't registered on 1-2 frequencies in 27 (31%) children, was registered on only 1 frequency or wasn't registered at all in 11 (13%) children. OAE was present in 83 (95%) children. Audiometric thresholds in all children were within a normal range. Speech intelligibility in quiet and noise in most cases was normal. 7 children with poor speech intelligibility or low Fisher questionnaire results got an extended examination. Binaural fusion speech test, dichotic test, RuMatrix test, gap detection test data showed no signs of central auditory processing disorders. CONCLUSION: There are no cases of hearing loss or central auditory processing disorders were found in children after new coronavirus infection. Due to variety of symptoms and long-term consequences of COVID-19 further hearing examination is required in this group of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Auditory Threshold , Child , Hearing , Humans , Noise , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Res Dev Disabil ; 119: 104089, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492571

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Barriers to communication for those with hearing loss are not only associated with social, emotional, educational and occupational difficulties, but also with reduced access to essential healthcare services, health information, and poorer health outcomes (Emond et al., 2015). These concerns are amplified with mandates such as physical distancing and the use of masks, which although needed to prevent respiratory transmission of SARS-Cov-2, obscure access to facial features needed for lipreading and sign language. OBJECTIVES: To compare the disparities of health knowledge and practice surrounding COVID-19, if any, among hearing and Deaf or Hard of Hearing (DHH) individuals. METHODS: A total of 110 (70 hearing and 40 DHH) participants were recruited in the unique linguistic context of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia utilising a cross-sectional electronic survey. Participants were differentiated according to status of hearing loss, communication mode, as well as country, age, sex, occupation, education level and satisfaction with available information. Various aspects of knowledge relating to COVID-19 and associated public health measures were tested by means of a questionnaire. RESULTS: A multivariate regression analysis showed that both the degree of hearing loss, and use of sign language as the primary means of communication were associated with lower scores. In addition, disparities exist in the use of health information sources, where DHH participants relied mostly on social media compared to the hearing group who relied predominantly on official government sources. CONCLUSIONS: In light of the pandemic, bridging the gap in health literacy for DHH individuals is essential in both policy and practice, in order to ensure equal access to healthcare and universal compliance with health directives at the population level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deafness , Health Literacy , Persons With Hearing Impairments , Cross-Sectional Studies , Deafness/epidemiology , Hearing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed radical behavioral and social changes in the general population, significantly impacting the lives of individuals affected by disabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on non-institutionalized subjects with sensorineural disabilities during the first COVID-19 wave in Italy. METHODS: A 39-item online national survey was disseminated from 1 April 2020 to 31 June 2020 via social media throughout Italy to communities of individuals with proven severe sensorineural disabilities, affiliated to five national patient associations. The survey collected extensive information on the socio-demographic profile, health, everyday activities, and lifestyle of individuals with hearing and visual disabilities. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-three respondents with hearing (66.9%) and visual (33.1%) disabilities returned a usable questionnaire. The mean age of interviewees was 38.4 ± 20.2 years and 56.3% of them were females. Despite the vast majority of respondents (77.9%) perceiving their health status as unchanged (68.8% of interviewees with hearing deficits vs. 96.3% of those with visual impairments), about half the interviewees reported sleep disorders during lock-down, more likely those with visual deficits. Remote services were seemingly more effective for business than school activities. Furthermore, although just 18.8% of respondents rated remote rehabilitation care unsatisfactory, only 12.8% of interviewees felt supported by health and social services during the COVID-19 emergency. The vast majority of respondents were concerned about the future and the risk of SARS-CoV-2 contagion, particularly individuals with hearing impairments. Among the various risk mitigation measures, facemasks caused the greatest discomfort due to communication barriers, particularly among interviewees affected by hearing disabilities (92.2% vs. 45.7%). The most common request (46.5%) of respondents to reduce the inconveniences of the COVID-19 emergency country lock-down was improving the access to and delivery of health and social services for individuals with sensorineural disabilities (19.3%), followed by the use of transparent masks (17.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Although health protection measures such as face masks and social distancing play a key role in preventing and controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the unmet needs of disabled individuals should be carefully considered, especially those affected by sensory disabilities. Tailored access to health and social services for individuals affected by sensorineural disabilities should be implemented. Additional actions should include the use of to face masks to reduce communication barriers linked to hearing-impairment, as well as the improvement of remote services, especially distance learning at school.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Hearing , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Med Pr ; 72(3): 321-325, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413233

ABSTRACT

In 2019, COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, evolved into a pandemic which is still going on. The basic clinical symptoms of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are: fever, dry cough, fatigue, muscle pain, respiratory problems, and the loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms, including those related to hearing and balance organs (hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness), are reported less frequently by patients. They are especially rarely reported as the first symptoms of this infection. In order to answer the question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can cause hearing and balance damage, the authors reviewed the literature sources from 2019-2020 included in EMBASE and PubMed, entering the following words: "hearing loss," "COVID-19," "coronavirus," "sensorineural hearing loss," "vertigo," and "dizziness." Ultimately, 9 studies on the possible relationship between hearing impairment and SARS-CoV-2, and 4 studies on the possible relationship between damage to the balance and SARS-CoV-2, were qualified for the study. The results of the analysis suggest a possible relationship between COVID-19 and hearing loss, with no evidence of a similar relationship between this virus and the balance system. The possible existence of such a relationship should be especially remembered by hospital emergency room doctors, otolaryngologists and audiologists, especially as regards the possibility of a sudden sensironeural hearing loss as the first symptom of COVID-19. This also applies to doctors of other specialties. The authors indicate the need for further, intensive and multifaceted research on this issue. Med Pr. 2021;72(3):321-5.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hearing Disorders/etiology , Hearing , Postural Balance , Vestibular Diseases/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Tinnitus/etiology , Vertigo/etiology , Young Adult
7.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(11): e14861, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405184

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of the study is to determine the acute stress and psychological resilience level of people with hearing impairment during the COVID-19 pandemic and to investigate the relationship between the grade of hearing impairment, psychological resilience and perceived stress level in this period. METHODS: A cross-sectional study. A total of 135 hearing-impaired individuals using hearing aids (study group) and 125 healthy individuals (control group) participated. The Turkish versions of the Acute Stress Symptoms Scale (ASSS) and Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) were applied to all participants. The Turkish version of Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability and Handicap (T-AIADH) was also applied to the study group in addition to other scales. The presence of any difference between the groups in terms of ASSS and BRS scores was investigated. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant difference between the control group and the study group in terms of ASSS results (Z = -4.4, P = .00). No statistically significant difference was found between the control group and the study group in terms of BRS scores (Z = -0.248, P = .804). Furthermore, T-AIADH scale was observed not to correlate either with ASSS or BRS (P > .05). In the study group, the change in income level after the pandemic, age and sex variables were determined as a significant predictor of ASSS. CONCLUSION: Identifying risks and protective factors for hearing-impaired individuals at the early stage of the epidemic is considered to be of critical importance to predict the psychological impact of both the epidemic and the response to the COVID-19 health crisis and to reduce stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hearing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Vestn Otorinolaringol ; 86(4): 9-12, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404140

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Typical cloth and medical masks, which are mandatory to wear during the COVID 19 pandemic, create visual barrier, obscure linguistic and nonverbal communication and interaction. Ski-slope hearing loss patients often don't admit their auditory insufficiency and do not use hearing aids due to acceptable speech intelligibility by using visual access to the mouth and other potential facial cues. PURPOSE: To assess the impact of universal face medical masks in public places on motivation to using hearing aids of patients with ski-slope hearing loss. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All the 504 patients (18-65 years old), who applied for < hearing care assistance and for the first time bought hearing aid were included. 266 patients (group A) applied from June to November 2020, when wearing facial masks was mandatory; 238 patients (group B) applied from June to November 2019, when wearing facial masks wasn't required. In both groups patients, who fulfilled the following criteria, were selected: 1) binaural mild to severe sensorineural ski-slope hearing loss lasting more than 3 years; 2) no progression of hearing loss within the last 3 years; 3) pure tone audiometry <20 dB HL at 125-1000 Hz frequencies; 4) hearing care with mono- or binaural hearing aids with the receiver-in-the-canal open-type. Questionnaires were administered to eligible patients in group A to assess the motivational components of acquiring hearing aids. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In group A, 74 (28%) patients received hearing aids according to the inclusion criteria, and in group B, 46 (19%) patients received hearing aids (p=0.033). Significant factors determining hearing aid acquisition were lack of visual contact when wearing a mask, communication difficulties in noisy environments and lack of intelligibility in a concert hall or lecture. CONCLUSION: Patients' motivation to hearing care grows in mandatory wearing facial masks conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic leading to an increase in patients using hearing aids.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Aids , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Hearing , Humans , Masks , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
Res Dev Disabil ; 117: 104059, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347812

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 to be a global pandemic. This prompted many countries, including Saudi Arabia, to suspend students' attendance at schools and to start distance education. This sudden shift in the educational system has affected students' learning, particularly for d/Deaf and hard-of-hearing (d/Dhh) students, who have unique language and communication needs. AIM: This study explores the challenges and support methods for d/Dhh students during their distance education in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A qualitative research study using semistructured interviews was conducted with 37 parents of d/Dhh students to answer the research questions. RESULTS: Three themes emerged from the parents' responses: (1) the challenges faced by d/Dhh students in distance education; (2) the specific needs of d/Dhh students in distance education; and (3) the supports provided to d/Dhh students in distance education. CONCLUSIONS: Distance education is a strategic choice, and parents must be informed about how to use the Madrasati e-learning platform effectively by providing solutions and supports. Additionally, d/Dhh students require various forms of ongoing support from both their families and schools to ensure that they succeed and benefit from their experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deafness , Education of Hearing Disabled , Education, Distance , Persons With Hearing Impairments , Hearing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Students
10.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(10): e14684, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334468

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Meaningfully grouping individuals with tinnitus who share a common characteristics (ie, subgrouping, phenotyping) may help tailor interventions to certain tinnitus subgroups and hence reduce outcome variability. The purpose of this study was to test if the presence of tinnitus subgroups are discernible based on hearing-related comorbidities, and to identify predictors of tinnitus severity for each subgroup identified. METHODS: An exploratory cross-sectional study was used. The study was nested within an online survey distributed worldwide to investigate tinnitus experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. The main outcome measure was the tinnitus Handicap Inventory- Screening Version. RESULTS: From the 3400 respondents, 2980 were eligible adults with tinnitus with an average age of 58 years (SD = 14.7) and 49% (n = 1457) being female. A three-cluster solution identified distinct subgroups, namely, those with tinnitus-only (n = 1306; 44%), those presenting with tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss and/or misophonia (n = 795; 27%), and those with tinnitus and hearing loss (n = 879; 29%). Those with tinnitus and hyperacusis reported the highest tinnitus severity (M = 20.3; SD = 10.5) and those with tinnitus and no hearing loss had the lowest tinnitus severity (M = 15.7; SD = 10.4). Younger age and the presence of mental health problems predicted greater tinnitus severity for all groups (ß ≤ -0.1, P ≤ .016). CONCLUSION: Further exploration of these potential subtypes are needed in both further research and clinical practice by initially triaging tinnitus patients prior to their clinical appointments based on the presence of hearing-related comorbidities. Unique management pathways and interventions could be tailored for each tinnitus subgroup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Tinnitus , Adult , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hearing , Hearing Loss/complications , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Tinnitus/epidemiology
11.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 152(12): 969-971, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321944
13.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253874, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291513

ABSTRACT

Daily-life conversation relies on speech perception in quiet and noise. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, face masks have become mandatory in many situations. Acoustic attenuation of sound pressure by the mask tissue reduces speech perception ability, especially in noisy situations. Masks also can impede the process of speech comprehension by concealing the movements of the mouth, interfering with lip reading. In this prospective observational, cross-sectional study including 17 participants with normal hearing, we measured the influence of acoustic attenuation caused by medical face masks (mouth and nose protection) according to EN 14683 and of N95 masks according to EN 1149 (EN 14683) on the speech recognition threshold and listening effort in various types of background noise. Averaged over all noise signals, a surgical mask significantly reduced the speech perception threshold in noise was by 1.6 dB (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0, 2.1) and an N95 mask reduced it significantly by 2.7 dB (95% CI, 2.2, 3.2). Use of a surgical mask did not significantly increase the 50% listening effort signal-to-noise ratio (increase of 0.58 dB; 95% CI, 0.4, 1.5), but use of an N95 mask did so significantly, by 2.2 dB (95% CI, 1.2, 3.1). In acoustic measures, mask tissue reduced amplitudes by up to 8 dB at frequencies above 1 kHz, whereas no reduction was observed below 1 kHz. We conclude that face masks reduce speech perception and increase listening effort in different noise signals. Together with additional interference because of impeded lip reading, the compound effect of face masks could have a relevant impact on daily life communication even in those with normal hearing.


Subject(s)
N95 Respirators , Speech Perception , Adult , Auditory Perception , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communication , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hearing , Humans , Male , Noise , Signal-To-Noise Ratio , Young Adult
14.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 278(9): 3299-3305, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286145

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the hearing function of patients with mild and moderate COVID-19. METHODS: The hospital staffs recovered from COVID-19 were included. The candidates who had an ear disease or progressive hearing loss prior to COVID-19, or having been hospitalised because of severe and critical COVID-19 were excluded. The age, sex, symptoms during COVID-19, and medications received for the disease were noted. The hearing thresholds (HT) of the participants who had an audiogram before having COVID-19 disease were recorded. A pure tone audiometry was conducted to all. The participants were classified into two groups; Group 1: participants who had an audiogram previously, Group 2: participants who didn't have an audiogram previously. The changes of the HTs of the participants in Group 1 were analyzed. The HTs of the participants in Group 2 were documented without any comparison. The HTs of all participants were also analyzed by classifying them into subgroups according to their symptoms during, and medications received for COVID-19. RESULTS: Fifty-four males and 47 females (18-59 years) were included. The participants' HTs in Group 1 (n = 31) did not change significantly at any of the frequencies after having COVID-19 (p > 0.05). The pure tone averages of the participants in Group 2 (n = 70) were below 25 dB and none of the participants reported worsening of their hearing permanently. The differences between the HTs of none of the subgroups were statistically significant (p > 0.05, p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Mild and moderate COVID-19 and its treatments did not affect the hearing function permanently.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Audiometry, Pure-Tone , Auditory Threshold , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Hearing , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Am J Audiol ; 30(3): 505-517, 2021 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279910

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study discusses the creation of an online, asynchronous presentation to educate adolescents about prevention of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) through interprofessional collaborations and electronic service-learning (eSL) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method The Hearing Education and Research (HEAR) presentation, which included activities and videos to educate a group of ethnically diverse adolescents (n = 100) on NIHL, was created by 11 doctor of audiology (AuD) students through online collaborations toward course-related eSL requirements. Adolescents responded to a baseline survey to assess hearing health-related behaviors prior to reviewing the presentation. A postprogram survey was administered 1 week after the presentation to assess change in knowledge and attitudes toward NIHL prevention. Online collaborations with schoolteachers helped with project implementation. Postreflection papers written by AuD students regarding the eSL activities were analyzed. Lastly, suggestions from a focus group of educators were included that highlight the role of interprofessional collaborations to enhance school-based hearing conservation opportunities. Results The HEAR presentation resulted in changes in knowledge about NIHL among the adolescents. Postreflection papers by the AuD students indicated that the eSL activity served as a high-impact pedagogical assignment, especially during the academic challenges of the pandemic. Feedback from a focus group of schoolteachers helped outline ideas for future implementation of sustainable hearing conservation programs in school settings. Conclusion The pilot data collected in this study serve as a proof of concept for future hearing conservation projects in school-based settings via interprofessional collaborations and by engaging university students via eSL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Electronics , Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced , Hearing , Pandemics , Adolescent , Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/prevention & control , Humans , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
16.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e044457, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276957

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In conjunction with a beta-lactam, aminoglycosides are the first-choice antibiotic for empirical treatment of sepsis in the neonatal period. The m.1555A>G variant predisposes to ototoxicity after aminoglycoside administration and has a prevalence of 1 in 500. Current genetic testing can take over 24 hours, an unacceptable delay in the acute setting. This prospective-observational trial will implement a rapid point of care test (POCT), facilitating tailored antibiotic prescribing to avoid hearing loss. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The genedrive POCT can detect the m.1555A>G variant in 26 min from buccal swab. This system will be integrated into the clinical pathways at two large UK neonatal centres over a minimum 6-month period. The primary outcome is the number of neonates successfully tested for the variant out of all babies prescribed antibiotics. As a secondary outcome, clinical timings will be compared with data collected prior to implementation, measuring the impact on routine practice. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Approval for the trial was granted by the Research Ethics Committee (REC) and Human Research Authority in August 2019. Results will be published in full on completion of the study. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN13704894. PROTOCOL VERSION: V 1.3.


Subject(s)
Deafness , Pharmacogenetics , Hearing , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Observational Studies as Topic , Point-of-Care Testing , Prospective Studies
17.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e216857, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192058

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought forth new challenges for health care workers, such as the daily use of personal protective equipment, including reusable facial respirators. Poor communication while wearing respirators may have fatal complications for patients, and no solution has been proposed to date. Objective: To examine whether use of an in-ear communication device is associated with improved communication while wearing different personal protective equipment (N95 mask, half-face elastomeric respirator, and powered air-purifying respirator [PAPR]) in the operating room. Design, Setting, and Participants: This quality improvement study was conducted in June 2020. Surgical residents from the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, were recruited. All participants had normal hearing, were fluent in English, and had access to the operating rooms at the Royal Victoria Hospital. Exposures: All participants performed the speech intelligibility tasks with and without an in-ear communication device. Main Outcomes and Measures: Speech intelligibility was measured using a word recognition task (Modified Rhyme Test) and a sentence recognition task (AzBio Sentence Test). A percentage correct score (0% to 100%) was obtained for each speech intelligibility test. Listening effort was assessed using the NASA Task Load Index. An overall workload score, ranging from 0 points (low workload) to 100 points (high workload), was obtained. Results: A total of 12 participants were included (mean [SD] age, 31.2 [1.9] years; 8 women [66.7%]). AzBio Sentence Test results revealed that, while wearing the N95 mask, the mean (SD) speech intelligibility was 98.8% (1.8%) without the in-ear device vs 94.3% (7.4%) with the device. While wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator, the mean speech intelligibility was 58.5% (12.4%) without the in-ear device vs 90.8% (8.9%) with the device. While wearing the PAPR, the mean speech intelligibility was 84.6% (9.8%) without the in-ear device vs 94.5% (5.5%) with the device. Use of the in-ear device was associated with a significant improvement in speech intelligibility while wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator (32.3%; 95% CI, 23.8%-40.7%; P < .001) and the PAPR (9.9%; 95% CI, 1.4%-18.3%; P = .01). Furthermore, use of the device was associated with decreased listening effort. The NASA Task Load Index results reveal that, while wearing the N95 mask, the mean (SD) overall workload score was 12.6 (10.6) points without the in-ear device vs 17.6 (9.2) points with the device. While wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator, the mean overall workload score was 67.7 (21.6) points without the in-ear device vs 29.3 (14.4) points with the in-ear device. While wearing the PAPR, the mean overall workload score was 42.2 (18.2) points without the in-ear device vs 23.8 (12.8) points with the in-ear device. Use of the in-ear device was associated with a significant decrease in overall workload score while wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator (38.4; 95% CI, 23.5-53.3; P < .001) and the PAPR (18.4; 95% CI, 0.4-36.4; P = .04). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that among participants using facial respirators that impaired communication, a novel in-ear device was associated with improved communication and decreased listening effort. Such a device may be a feasible solution for protecting health care workers in the operating room while allowing them to communicate safely, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Hearing Aids/standards , Hearing , N95 Respirators/adverse effects , N95 Respirators/standards , Operating Rooms , Respiratory Protective Devices/adverse effects , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Canada , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Male , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Operating Rooms/standards , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Simulation Training , Speech Discrimination Tests/methods
18.
Med Pr ; 72(3): 321-325, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175785

ABSTRACT

In 2019, COVID-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, evolved into a pandemic which is still going on. The basic clinical symptoms of the SARS-CoV-2 infection are: fever, dry cough, fatigue, muscle pain, respiratory problems, and the loss of smell or taste. Other symptoms, including those related to hearing and balance organs (hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness), are reported less frequently by patients. They are especially rarely reported as the first symptoms of this infection. In order to answer the question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can cause hearing and balance damage, the authors reviewed the literature sources from 2019-2020 included in EMBASE and PubMed, entering the following words: "hearing loss," "COVID-19," "coronavirus," "sensorineural hearing loss," "vertigo," and "dizziness." Ultimately, 9 studies on the possible relationship between hearing impairment and SARS-CoV-2, and 4 studies on the possible relationship between damage to the balance and SARS-CoV-2, were qualified for the study. The results of the analysis suggest a possible relationship between COVID-19 and hearing loss, with no evidence of a similar relationship between this virus and the balance system. The possible existence of such a relationship should be especially remembered by hospital emergency room doctors, otolaryngologists and audiologists, especially as regards the possibility of a sudden sensironeural hearing loss as the first symptom of COVID-19. This also applies to doctors of other specialties. The authors indicate the need for further, intensive and multifaceted research on this issue. Med Pr. 2021;72(3):321-5.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hearing Disorders/etiology , Hearing , Postural Balance , Vestibular Diseases/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hearing Loss/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Tinnitus/etiology , Vertigo/etiology , Young Adult
19.
Anesthesiology ; 134(4): 518-525, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1010655

ABSTRACT

Clinicians who care for patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) must wear a full suite of personal protective equipment, including an N95 mask or powered air purifying respirator, eye protection, a fluid-impermeable gown, and gloves. This combination of personal protective equipment may cause increased work of breathing, reduced field of vision, muffled speech, difficulty hearing, and heat stress. These effects are not caused by individual weakness; they are normal and expected reactions that any person will have when exposed to an unusual environment. The physiologic and psychologic challenges imposed by personal protective equipment may have multiple causes, but immediate countermeasures and long-term mitigation strategies can help to improve a clinician's ability to provide care. Ultimately, a systematic approach to the design and integration of personal protective equipment is needed to improve the safety of patients and clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Work Performance/statistics & numerical data , Equipment Design , Hearing , Heat-Shock Response , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Speech , Visual Fields , Work of Breathing
20.
Am J Case Rep ; 21: e927519, 2020 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-994257

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Few reports have described the association between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and sudden hearing loss. The precise pathophysiological mechanism causing this symptom is unknown. This report describes a case of sudden hearing loss in a patient with COVID-19 pneumonia due to SARS-CoV-2 infection. CASE REPORT A 67-year-old woman with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), as confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs, was examined. She experienced sudden hearing loss in her right ear and disabling tinnitus. She underwent combined corticosteroid therapy (oral and intratympanic), resulting in an isolated improvement of 250 kHz in the right ear (from 60 dB, the threshold became 15 dB) and of 4, 6, and 8 kHz in the left ear (from 35 dB, 20 dB, and 35 dB, the thresholds became 15 dB, 5 dB and 20 dB, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Although rare, hearing loss appears to be a possible sequela to SARS-CoV-2 infection and deserves attention because it is a medical emergency requiring immediate clinical treatment. Additional studies are needed to assess the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in and the long-term characteristics of this type of hearing loss.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Hearing Loss, Sudden/etiology , Hearing/physiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Hearing Loss, Sudden/diagnosis , Hearing Loss, Sudden/physiopathology , Hearing Tests , Humans , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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