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1.
J Int Adv Otol ; 18(6): 465-470, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110570

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the effect on speech perception and lack of hearing devices gain with surgical masks worn in hearing aid users. METHODS: This prospective cohort study enrolled consecutive patients between November 2020 and February 2021 in a tertiary care medical center from Spain. Fifty-five subjects have been included, 10 as control group, with normal hearing, and 45 patients with sensory-neural hearing loss and hearing aid users, ranging in age between 31 and 83 years old, and were recruited randomized in 4 months. Appropriate test was done previously to check adequate functioning from devices and suitable adaptation. Control group had no hearing impairment neither otologic disease. RESULTS: Disyllabic test in quiet get worse with face mask with a significant difference and stronger impact in noisy background. Age made no difference. Adding lipreading speech perception improved by 95.1 % for younger subjects (<50 years of age) and 91.2% for older subjects (>50 years of age). In the control sample, there was no differences in any condition. CONCLUSION: Despite advantages of wearing mask in preventing coronavirus disease 2019 spread, we must consider that they have also drawbacks for some groups like hearing aid users. In this research, we have not observed high frequencies perception decrease with surgical masks worn, but there was reduction in speech perception, most notably in hearing aids wearers in noisy environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Aids , Speech Perception , Humans , Child, Preschool , Child , Aged, 80 and over , Masks , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Hearing
2.
Work ; 73(2): 393-404, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Implications of entrepreneurial education (EE), entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) and personality traits (PT) on the entrepreneurial intentions of the deaf is yet unknown in existing literature. OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of EE, ESE and PT on the entrepreneurial intentions among some 250 Deaf and Hard of hearing (DHH) students from two post-secondary institutions in Oyo state, Nigeria. METHODS: A descriptive research design was adopted, while a structured paper questionnaire was used for data collection. The data generated were analysed using descriptive statistics and the inferential statistics of Pearson Product Moment Correlation and hierarchical multiple regression at a 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS: The entrepreneurial intentions of DHH college students had a significant positive correlation with EE (r = 0.18, p < 0.05), agreeableness (r = 0.23, p < 0.05), and conscientiousness (r = 0.19, p < 0.05); but had a negative correlation with ESE, neuroticism and openness. Furthermore, personality traits and ESE were the highest predictors of entrepreneurial intention among DHH college students. CONCLUSIONS: Personality traits were the greatest predictor of the entrepreneurial intention of DHH college students post the COVID-19 lockdowns in Nigeria. Therefore, higher education institutions should intensify their efforts in entrepreneurial education and parents of DHH students should encourage them to seek entrepreneurial opportunities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intention , Humans , Self Efficacy , Communicable Disease Control , Students , Hearing
3.
Otolaryngol Pol ; 76(4): 1-5, 2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2072107

ABSTRACT

The Newborn Hearing Screening Program has existed in Poland for almost 20 years. However, for the first time in the history of his activity, he had to deal with large logistic and staffing problems. The analysis compared the years 2020 and 2021 in terms of the functioning of centers that conduct audiological diagnostics of the Program during the Covid-19 pandemic. In order to obtain relevant information, a telephone survey was conducted at the beginning of 2022 with questions about the performance of standard activities related to the Program. Results In 2020, 60 centers conducting audiological diagnostics (66.67%) were suspended, and 30 were working under the sanitary and epidemiological regime (33.33%). In 2021, only 5 (5.26%) diagnostic centers with their headquarters in facilities transformed into so-called homonymous hospitals, dealing only with the treatment of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus, were suspended. Discussion The development of the pandemic and the related limitations around the world had a significant impact on the quality and scope of medical services provided. Many hospitals were quickly transformed into closed centers treating only patients with SARS-CoV-2. Audiological consultations take place in closed, soundproof rooms. Face-to-face contact was required for hearing assessment, fitting hearing aids, troubleshooting, and rehabilitation. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced audiology to modify existing practices. The use of telemedicine was increasingly preferred. In Poland, as all over the world, the scope of remote consultations has expanded, but due to technological and hardware limitations, audiological procedures remained in the sphere of direct contact with the patient. Conclusions In the first year after the announcement of the pandemic, significant difficulties were observed in the functioning of centers dealing with the diagnosis of children with suspected hearing loss. The appearance of the SARS-CoV-2 virus forced us to develop innovative methods of early diagnosis and treatment of children with hearing impairment, which resulted in the stabilization of the work of individuals in the following year.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Hearing , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Am J Audiol ; 30(3): 505-517, 2021 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050574

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study discusses the creation of an online, asynchronous presentation to educate adolescents about prevention of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) through interprofessional collaborations and electronic service-learning (eSL) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method The Hearing Education and Research (HEAR) presentation, which included activities and videos to educate a group of ethnically diverse adolescents (n = 100) on NIHL, was created by 11 doctor of audiology (AuD) students through online collaborations toward course-related eSL requirements. Adolescents responded to a baseline survey to assess hearing health-related behaviors prior to reviewing the presentation. A postprogram survey was administered 1 week after the presentation to assess change in knowledge and attitudes toward NIHL prevention. Online collaborations with schoolteachers helped with project implementation. Postreflection papers written by AuD students regarding the eSL activities were analyzed. Lastly, suggestions from a focus group of educators were included that highlight the role of interprofessional collaborations to enhance school-based hearing conservation opportunities. Results The HEAR presentation resulted in changes in knowledge about NIHL among the adolescents. Postreflection papers by the AuD students indicated that the eSL activity served as a high-impact pedagogical assignment, especially during the academic challenges of the pandemic. Feedback from a focus group of schoolteachers helped outline ideas for future implementation of sustainable hearing conservation programs in school settings. Conclusion The pilot data collected in this study serve as a proof of concept for future hearing conservation projects in school-based settings via interprofessional collaborations and by engaging university students via eSL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Electronics , Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced , Hearing , Pandemics , Adolescent , Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/prevention & control , Humans , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
5.
S Afr J Commun Disord ; 69(2): e1-e11, 2022 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024686

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in communication being heightened as one of the critical aspects in the implementation of interventions. Delays in the relaying of vital information by policymakers have the potential to be detrimental, especially for the hearing impaired. OBJECTIVES:  This study aims to conduct a scoping review on the application of artificial intelligence (AI) for real-time speech-to-text to sign language translation and consequently propose an AI-based real-time translation solution for South African languages from speech-to-text to sign language. METHODS:  Electronic bibliographic databases including ScienceDirect, PubMed, Scopus, MEDLINE and ProQuest were searched to identify peer-reviewed publications published in English between 2019 and 2021 that provided evidence on AI-based real-time speech-to-text to sign language translation as a solution for the hearing impaired. This review was done as a precursor to the proposed real-time South African translator. RESULTS:  The review revealed a dearth of evidence on the adoption and/or maximisation of AI and machine learning (ML) as possible solutions for the hearing impaired. There is a clear lag in clinical utilisation and investigation of these technological advances, particularly in the African continent. CONCLUSION:  Assistive technology that caters specifically for the South African community is essential to ensuring a two-way communication between individuals who can hear clearly and individuals with hearing impairments, thus the proposed solution presented in this article.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Loss , Artificial Intelligence , Hearing , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Humans , Sign Language , South Africa , Speech
6.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 19(1): 111, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009419

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding determinants of children's outdoor play is important for improving low physical activity levels, and schools are a key setting for both. Safety concerns shape children's opportunity to play actively outdoors, therefore, this qualitative evidence synthesis aimed to i) examine adult (e.g., parent, teacher, yard supervisor, principal) perspectives on safety and risk in children's active play during recess in elementary and/or middle schools, and ii) identify how safety and risk influence playground supervision and decision making in this setting. METHODS: Six electronic databases were systematically searched in March 2021, with an updated search in June 2022. Records were screened against eligibility criteria using Covidence software, and data extraction and synthesis were performed using predesigned coding forms in Microsoft Excel and NVivo. Framework synthesis methodology was employed, guided by a conceptual framework structured on the socio-ecological model (SEM) and affordance theory. RESULTS: From 10,370 records, 25 studies were included that represented 608 adults across 89 schools from nine countries. The synthesis identified 10 constraining and four affording factors that influenced whether school staff were risk-averse or risk tolerant during recess, and, in turn, the degree to which children's play was managed. Constraining factors stemmed from fears for children's physical safety, and fear of blame and liability in the event of playground injury, which shaped parent, school staff and institutional responses to risk. Interrelated factors across SEM levels combined to drive risk-averse decision making and constraining supervision. Emerging evidence suggests children's active play in schools can be promoted by fostering a risk tolerant and play friendly culture in schools through play facilitation training (e.g., risk-reframing, conflict resolution) and engaging stakeholders in the development of school policies and rules that balance benefits of play against potential risks. CONCLUSIONS: Findings show several socio-cultural factors limited the ability of school staff to genuinely promote active play. Future work should seek to foster risk tolerance in schools, challenge the cultural norms that shape parent attitudes and institutional responses to risk in children's play, and explore novel methods for overcoming policy barriers and fear of liability in schools. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO registration: CRD42021238719.


Subject(s)
Play and Playthings , Schools , Child , Hearing , Humans , Motivation , Parents
7.
Otol Neurotol ; 43(8): e865-e871, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992397

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To study the evolution of type D personality traits in older adults after cochlear implantation compared with a control group of severely hearing impaired older adults who did not receive a cochlear implant (CI). The influence of COVID-19 on this evolution was also explored. Type D personality combines a high degree of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI). METHODS: In this prospective, longitudinal, controlled multicenter exploratory study, 76 older CI users and 21 severely hearing impaired controls without CI were included. The CI group and the control group did not differ significantly regarding age, formal education, residual hearing, Type D Scale-14 (DS14) total score, NA, and SI at baseline. Type D personality traits were assessed with the DS14 at baseline (T0) and 14 months later (T14). RESULTS: Type D personality traits differed significantly over time between the CI group and the control group (p < 0.001). In the CI group, the DS14 total score (mean delta T = -6.63; p < 0.001), NA (mean delta T = -3.26; p < 0.001), and SI (mean delta T = -3.37; p < 0.001) improved significantly over time (delta T = T14-T0), whereas no significant difference was found in the control group. Significantly fewer subjects were categorized as type D personalities in the CI group (delta T = -12; p = 0.023) at T14, whereas no significant change was found in the control group (delta T = 3; p = 0.250). COVID-19 did not influence the evolution of type D personality traits significantly in the CI group. CONCLUSION: Cochlear implantation has a positive effect on type D personality traits in older adults with a severe-to-profound hearing impairment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cochlear Implantation , Cochlear Implants , Hearing Loss , Type D Personality , Aged , Hearing , Hearing Loss/surgery , Humans , Prospective Studies
8.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 279(11): 5473, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1982145
9.
Ear Hear ; 43(6): 1917-1919, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931919

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To report the direct and indirect impact of coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on the Universal Newborn Hearing Screening program of our institution (Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Sassari). DESIGN: Monocentric retrospective study whose target population included all the newborns born in or referred to our hospital in 2019 and 2020. RESULTS: There is no statistically significant difference in time to retest or loss to follow-up rate between the 2 years considered (2019 to 2020). Referral rate is not higher for newborns born to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 polymerase chain reaction positive mothers. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to the analyzed variables, coronavirus disease 2019 seems to have a limited impact on our screening program. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 did not behave as an audiological risk factor in our series.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Tests , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Neonatal Screening , Retrospective Studies , Hearing
10.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(5): 103523, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926171

ABSTRACT

The 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused over 500 million confirmed cases (including pregnant women) worldwide. Recently, hearing status in newborns born to mothers with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has received attention. This systematic review outlines the current knowledge regarding the effects of maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy on newborn hearing. Intrauterine SARS-CoV-2 infection has the potential to affect the auditory system of the newborn due to intrauterine hypoxia and vertical transmission. SARS-CoV-2 might have a greater influence on hearing loss (HL) in newborns during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Therefore, all newborns whose mothers had COVID-19 during pregnancy should be evaluated for cochlear function, regardless of whether their mothers were symptomatic at the time of the disease. However, the understanding of this issue is not consistent and remains controversial. Since early identification and intervention of congenital HL are crucial to the language development of newborns, newborns should be provided with audiological evaluation by various approaches, including Tele-audiology, in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Female , Hearing , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
11.
12.
Vestn Otorinolaringol ; 87(2): 10-16, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1863438

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate advantages and effectiveness of remote rehabilitation services for hearing-impaired children at Center of Pediatric Audiology during COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 181 children with different types and degrees of permanent hearing loss, their parents and 10 hearing care professionals (audiologists, speech-language therapists) were included in the study. 2115 rehabilitation services were provided during 3 months: video- and text consultations, video lessons with child, sending homework to parents, etc. RESULTS: The results of questionnaires showed that, on specialists' and parents' opinion, remote rehabilitation care is effective tool for hearing impaired children during emergency situations. TeleCare allowed to improve parents' abilities to manage with children by themselves, their understanding goals and methods of rehabilitation, improving child's hearing and speech skills. 95% of parents were satisfied by remote rehabilitation. Advantages and problems of remote hearing rehabilitation were analyzed from the sides of professionals and parents. The most challenging activities for professionals during TeleCare were: evaluation of HA/CI effectiveness, diagnosis and developing of hearing and speech. CONCLUSIONS: The experience of remote hearing rehabilitation in emergency situation allows to conclude that this type of care could be useful in clinical practice after pandemic for parents consulting and for children with motor problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telerehabilitation , Audiologists , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Hearing , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Viruses ; 14(5)2022 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Various symptoms have been associated with COVID-19, but little is known about the impacts of COVID-19 on the sensory system, risk factors, and the duration of symptoms. This study assesses olfactory, gustatory, hearing, and vestibular systems after COVID-19. METHODS: This cross-sectional, single-center study involved 50 patients one to six months after COVID-19 and reports their patient records and the extent, onset, and duration of olfactory, gustatory, hearing, and balance disorders using questionnaires during and after COVID-19. Sensory symptoms were objectively studied using the following clinical tests after COVID-19 Sniffin' Sticks, taste tests, tone/speech audiometry, and video head impulse test. RESULTS: Post-COVID-19-patients were suffering from olfactory and gustatory impairment for up to six months. According to the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, balance disorders were less noticed: Overall, about 40% of the patients during COVID-19 and nearly all patients recovered within six months. After COVID-19, clinical tests revealed that 75% were suffering from hyposomnia/anosmia, and 20% of all patients reported mild hypogeusia for up to six months. Vestibular disorders and hearing impairment rarely/did not occur. Females were significantly more affected by sensory impairments than males. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 particularly caused olfactory and gustatory impairment; balance disorders were present too; vestibular and auditory symptoms were negligible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Olfaction Disorders , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hearing , Humans , Male , Olfaction Disorders/complications , Olfaction Disorders/diagnosis , Smell , Taste
15.
Atten Percept Psychophys ; 84(3): 1016-1042, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792350

ABSTRACT

Hearing in noise is a core problem in audition, and a challenge for hearing-impaired listeners, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We explored whether harmonic frequency relations, a signature property of many communication sounds, aid hearing in noise for normal hearing listeners. We measured detection thresholds in noise for tones and speech synthesized to have harmonic or inharmonic spectra. Harmonic signals were consistently easier to detect than otherwise identical inharmonic signals. Harmonicity also improved discrimination of sounds in noise. The largest benefits were observed for two-note up-down "pitch" discrimination and melodic contour discrimination, both of which could be performed equally well with harmonic and inharmonic tones in quiet, but which showed large harmonic advantages in noise. The results show that harmonicity facilitates hearing in noise, plausibly by providing a noise-robust pitch cue that aids detection and discrimination.


Subject(s)
Hearing Aids , Speech Perception , Auditory Perception , Auditory Threshold , Hearing , Hearing Tests , Humans , Noise , Pitch Discrimination
16.
Front Public Health ; 9: 669727, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771104

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hearing loss is a major public health challenge. Audiology services need to utilise a range of rehabilitative services and maximise innovative practice afforded by technology to actively promote personalized, participatory, preventative and predictive care if they are to cope with the social and economic burden placed on the population by the rapidly rising prevalence of hearing loss. Digital interventions and teleaudiology could be a key part of providing high quality, cost-effective, patient-centred management. There is currently very limited evidence that assesses the hearing impaired patient perspective on the acceptance and usability of this type of technology. AIM: This study aims to identify patient perceptions of the use of a hearing support system including a mobile smartphone app when used with Bluetooth-connected hearing aids across the everyday life of users, as part of the EVOTION project. METHODS: We applied a questionnaire to 564 participants in three countries across Europe and analysed the following topics: connectivity, hearing aid controls, instructional videos, audiological tests and auditory training. KEY FINDINGS: Older users were just as satisfied as younger users when operating this type of technology. Technical problems such as Bluetooth connectivity need to be minimised as this issue is highly critical for user satisfaction, engagement and uptake. A system that promotes user-controllability of hearing aids that is more accessible and easier to use is highly valued. Participants are happy to utilise monitoring tests and auditory training on a mobile phone out of the clinic but in order to have value the test battery needs to be relevant and tailored to each user, easy to understand and use. Such functions can elicit a negative as well as positive experience for each user. CONCLUSION: Older and younger adults can utilise an eHealth mobile app to complement their rehabilitation and health care. If the technology works well, is tailored to the individual and in-depth personalised guidance and support is provided, it could assist maximisation of hearing aid uptake, promotion of self-management and improving outcomes.


Subject(s)
Hearing Aids , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Adult , Hearing , Humans
17.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264581, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742008

ABSTRACT

Having a large receptive vocabulary benefits speech-in-noise recognition for young children, though this is not always the case for older children or adults. These observations could indicate that effects of receptive vocabulary size on speech-in-noise recognition differ depending on familiarity of the target words, with effects observed only for more recently acquired and less frequent words. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of vocabulary size on open-set speech-in-noise recognition for adults with normal hearing. Targets were words acquired at 4, 9, 12 and 15 years of age, and they were presented at signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of -5 and -7 dB. Percent correct scores tended to fall with increasing age of acquisition (AoA), with the caveat that performance at -7 dB SNR was better for words acquired at 9 years of age than earlier- or later-acquired words. Similar results were obtained whether the AoA of the target words was blocked or mixed across trials. Differences in word duration appear to account for nonmonotonic effects of AoA. For all conditions, a positive correlation was observed between recognition and vocabulary size irrespective of target word AoA, indicating that effects of vocabulary size are not limited to recently acquired words. This dataset does not support differential assessment of AoA, lexical frequency, and other stimulus features known to affect lexical access.


Subject(s)
Speech Perception , Vocabulary , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Hearing , Humans , Noise , Speech , Young Adult
18.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 279(10): 4815-4823, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739321

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To gauge the benefits to children of upgrading speech processors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study involved 297 children, aged from 7.3 to 18.0 years, whose processors were upgraded to either Nucleus 7 or Kanso 2, or to Sonnet 2 or Rondo 3. To document the benefits of the upgrades, a speech-in-noise discrimination test and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) were used. RESULTS: There was a significant benefit from the newer processors in terms of speech discrimination in noise. Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) indicated less hearing disability, a higher level of functioning in everyday life situations, and more satisfaction with the new speech processor in social situations. CONCLUSION: There is a measurable improvement in performance when the devices are upgraded to the new technology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cochlear Implantation , Cochlear Implants , Speech Perception , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Hearing , Humans , Pandemics , Speech
19.
Otol Neurotol ; 43(3): 282-288, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722677

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of wearing a simulated mask on speech perception of normal-hearing subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: Fifteen normal-hearing, native German speakers (8 female, 7 male). INTERVENTION: Different experimental conditions with and without simulated face masks using the audiovisual version of the female German Matrix test (Oldenburger Satztest, OLSA). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at speech intelligibility of 80%. RESULTS: The SNR at which 80% speech intelligibility was achieved deteriorated by a mean of 4.1 dB SNR when simulating a medical mask and by 5.1 dB SNR when simulating a cloth mask in comparison to the audiovisual condition without mask. Interestingly, the contribution of the visual component alone was 2.6 dB SNR and thus had a larger effect than the acoustic component in the medical mask condition. CONCLUSIONS: As expected, speech understanding with face masks was significantly worse than under control conditions. Thus, the speaker's use of face masks leads to a significant deterioration of speech understanding by the normal-hearing listener. The data suggest that these effects may play a role in many everyday situations that typically involve noise.


Subject(s)
Masks , Speech Perception , Female , Hearing , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Speech Intelligibility
20.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(2): e32581, 2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hearing loss affects 1 in 5 people worldwide and is estimated to affect 1 in 4 by 2050. Treatment relies on the accurate diagnosis of hearing loss; however, this first step is out of reach for >80% of those affected. Increasingly automated approaches are being developed for self-administered digital hearing assessments without the direct involvement of professionals. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide an overview of digital approaches in automated and machine learning assessments of hearing using pure-tone audiometry and to focus on the aspects related to accuracy, reliability, and time efficiency. This review is an extension of a 2013 systematic review. METHODS: A search across the electronic databases of PubMed, IEEE, and Web of Science was conducted to identify relevant reports from the peer-reviewed literature. Key information about each report's scope and details was collected to assess the commonalities among the approaches. RESULTS: A total of 56 reports from 2012 to June 2021 were included. From this selection, 27 unique automated approaches were identified. Machine learning approaches require fewer trials than conventional threshold-seeking approaches, and personal digital devices make assessments more affordable and accessible. Validity can be enhanced using digital technologies for quality surveillance, including noise monitoring and detecting inconclusive results. CONCLUSIONS: In the past 10 years, an increasing number of automated approaches have reported similar accuracy, reliability, and time efficiency as manual hearing assessments. New developments, including machine learning approaches, offer features, versatility, and cost-effectiveness beyond manual audiometry. Used within identified limitations, automated assessments using digital devices can support task-shifting, self-care, telehealth, and clinical care pathways.


Subject(s)
Hearing Loss , Hearing , Audiometry, Pure-Tone/methods , Hearing Loss/diagnosis , Hearing Loss/therapy , Humans , Machine Learning , Reproducibility of Results
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