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1.
Am J Cardiol ; 162: 111-115, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560061

ABSTRACT

Cardiac arrhythmias have been observed in patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Most analyses of rhythm disturbances to date include cases of sinus tachycardia, which may not accurately reflect true cardiac dysfunction. Furthermore, limited data exist regarding the development of conduction disturbances in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Hence, we performed a retrospective review and compared characteristics and outcomes for patients with versus without incident arrhythmia, excluding sinus tachycardia, as well as between those with versus without incident conduction disturbances. There were 27 of 173 patients (16%) hospitalized with COVID-19 who developed a new arrhythmia. Incident arrhythmias were associated with an increased risk of intensive care unit admission (59% vs 31%, p = 0.0045), intubation (56% vs 20%, p <0.0001), and inpatient death (41% vs 10%, p = 0.0002) without an associated increase in risk of decompensated heart failure or other cardiac issues. New conduction disturbances were found in 13 patients (8%). Incident arrhythmias in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 are associated with an increased risk of mortality, likely reflective of underlying COVID-19 disease severity more than intrinsic cardiac dysfunction. Conduction disturbances occurred less commonly and were not associated with adverse patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Inpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
3.
PLoS Med ; 18(9): e1003766, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470656

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Amodiaquine is a 4-aminoquinoline antimalarial similar to chloroquine that is used extensively for the treatment and prevention of malaria. Data on the cardiovascular effects of amodiaquine are scarce, although transient effects on cardiac electrophysiology (electrocardiographic QT interval prolongation and sinus bradycardia) have been observed. We conducted an individual patient data meta-analysis to characterise the cardiovascular effects of amodiaquine and thereby support development of risk minimisation measures to improve the safety of this important antimalarial. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Studies of amodiaquine for the treatment or prevention of malaria were identified from a systematic review. Heart rates and QT intervals with study-specific heart rate correction (QTcS) were compared within studies and individual patient data pooled for multivariable linear mixed effects regression. The meta-analysis included 2,681 patients from 4 randomised controlled trials evaluating artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) containing amodiaquine (n = 725), lumefantrine (n = 499), piperaquine (n = 716), and pyronaridine (n = 566), as well as monotherapy with chloroquine (n = 175) for uncomplicated malaria. Amodiaquine prolonged QTcS (mean = 16.9 ms, 95% CI: 15.0 to 18.8) less than chloroquine (21.9 ms, 18.3 to 25.6, p = 0.0069) and piperaquine (19.2 ms, 15.8 to 20.5, p = 0.0495), but more than lumefantrine (5.6 ms, 2.9 to 8.2, p < 0.001) and pyronaridine (-1.2 ms, -3.6 to +1.3, p < 0.001). In individuals aged ≥12 years, amodiaquine reduced heart rate (mean reduction = 15.2 beats per minute [bpm], 95% CI: 13.4 to 17.0) more than piperaquine (10.5 bpm, 7.7 to 13.3, p = 0.0013), lumefantrine (9.3 bpm, 6.4 to 12.2, p < 0.001), pyronaridine (6.6 bpm, 4.0 to 9.3, p < 0.001), and chloroquine (5.9 bpm, 3.2 to 8.5, p < 0.001) and was associated with a higher risk of potentially symptomatic sinus bradycardia (≤50 bpm) than lumefantrine (risk difference: 14.8%, 95% CI: 5.4 to 24.3, p = 0.0021) and chloroquine (risk difference: 8.0%, 95% CI: 4.0 to 12.0, p < 0.001). The effect of amodiaquine on the heart rate of children aged <12 years compared with other antimalarials was not clinically significant. Study limitations include the unavailability of individual patient-level adverse event data for most included participants, but no serious complications were documented. CONCLUSIONS: While caution is advised in the use of amodiaquine in patients aged ≥12 years with concomitant use of heart rate-reducing medications, serious cardiac conduction disorders, or risk factors for torsade de pointes, there have been no serious cardiovascular events reported after amodiaquine in widespread use over 7 decades. Amodiaquine and structurally related antimalarials in the World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended dose regimens alone or in ACTs are safe for the treatment and prevention of malaria.


Subject(s)
Amodiaquine/adverse effects , Antimalarials/adverse effects , Bradycardia/chemically induced , Heart Conduction System/drug effects , Heart Rate/drug effects , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Adolescent , Adult , Bradycardia/diagnosis , Bradycardia/physiopathology , Cardiotoxicity , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Humans , Infant , Long QT Syndrome/diagnosis , Long QT Syndrome/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Young Adult
4.
Europace ; 23(1): 123-129, 2021 01 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387869

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The main severe complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection are pneumonia and respiratory distress syndrome. Recent studies, however, reported that cardiac injury, as assessed by troponin levels, is associated with a worse outcome in these patients. No study hitherto assessed whether the simple standard electrocardiogram (ECG) may be helpful for risk stratification in these patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 324 consecutive patients admitted to our Emergency Department with a confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Standard 12-lead ECG recorded on admission was assessed for cardiac rhythm and rate, atrioventricular and intraventricular conduction, abnormal Q/QS wave, ST segment and T wave changes, corrected QT interval, and tachyarrhythmias. At a mean follow-up of 31 ± 11 days, 44 deaths occurred (13.6%). Most ECG variables were significantly associated with mortality, including atrial fibrillation (P = 0.002), increasing heart rate (P = 0.002), presence of left bundle branch block (LBBB; P < 0.001), QRS duration (P <0 .001), a QRS duration of ≥110 ms (P < 0.001), ST segment depression (P < 0.001), abnormal Q/QS wave (P = 0.034), premature ventricular complexes (PVCs; P = 0.051), and presence of any ECG abnormality [hazard ratio (HR) 4.58; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.40-8.76; P < 0.001]. At multivariable analysis, QRS duration (P = 0.002), QRS duration ≥110 ms (P = 0.03), LBBB (P = 0.014) and presence of any ECG abnormality (P = 0.04) maintained a significant independent association with mortality. CONCLUSION: Our data show that standard ECG can be helpful for an initial risk stratification of patients admitted for SARS-CoV-2 infectious disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Electrocardiography , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Heart Rate , Action Potentials , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Heart Diseases/etiology , Heart Diseases/mortality , Heart Diseases/physiopathology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
5.
Europace ; 23(3): 345-352, 2021 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343692

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, outpatient visits in the atrial fibrillation (AF) clinic of the Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+) were transferred into teleconsultations. The aim was to develop anon-demand app-based heart rate and rhythm monitoring infrastructure to allow appropriatmanagement of AF through teleconsultation. In line with the fundamental aspects of integrated care, including actively involving patients in the care process and providing comprehensive care by a multidisciplinary team, we implemented a mobile health (mHealth) intervention to support teleconsultations with AF patients: TeleCheck-AF. The TeleCheck-AF approach guarantees the continuity of comprehensive AF management and supports integrated care through teleconsultation during COVID-19. It incorporates three important components: (i) a structured teleconsultation ('Tele'), (ii) a CE-marked app-based on-demand heart rate and rhythm monitoring infrastructure ('Check'), and (iii) comprehensive AF management ('AF'). In this article, we describe the components and implementation of the TeleCheck-AF approach in an integrated and specialized AF-clinic through teleconsultation. The TeleCheck-AF approach is currently implemented in numerous European centres during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate , Mobile Applications , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Smartphone , Action Potentials , Atrial Fibrillation/physiopathology , Atrial Fibrillation/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results
6.
Cardiovasc Toxicol ; 21(9): 687-694, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237553

ABSTRACT

Several medicines, including cancer therapies, are known to alter the electrophysiological function of ventricular myocytes resulting in abnormal prolongation and dispersion of ventricular repolarization (quantified by multi-lead QTc measurement). This effect could be amplified by other concomitant factors (e.g., combination with other drugs affecting the QT, and/or electrolyte abnormalities, such as especially hypokalemia, hypomagnesaemia, and hypocalcemia). Usually, this condition results in higher risk of torsade de point and other life-threatening arrhythmias, related to unrecognized unpaired cardiac ventricular repolarization reserve (VRR). Being VRR a dynamic phenomenon, QT prolongation might often not be identified during the 10-s standard 12-lead ECG recording at rest, leaving the patient at increased risk for life-threatening event. We report the case of a 49-year woman, undergoing tamoxifen therapy for breast cancer, which alteration of ventricular repolarization reserve, persisting also after correction of concomitant recurrent hypokalemia, was evidenced only after manual measurements of the corrected QT (QTc) interval from selected intervals of the 12-lead ECG Holter monitoring. This otherwise missed finding was fundamental to drive the discontinuation of tamoxifen, shifting to another "safer" therapeutic option, and to avoid the use of potentially arrhythmogenic antibiotics when treating a bilateral pneumonia in recent COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/drug therapy , Electrocardiography , Estrogen Antagonists/adverse effects , Heart Conduction System/drug effects , Tamoxifen/adverse effects , Action Potentials , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/chemically induced , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Drug Substitution , Female , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate/drug effects , Humans , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
7.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(3): 197-203, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133865

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of the current study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion (PWD) as a predictor of atrial fibrillation in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19. In addition, the relationship between the PWD and inflammation parameters was investigated. METHODS: A total of 140 newly diagnosed COVID-19 patients and 140 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included in the study. The risk of atrial fibrillation was evaluated by calculating the electrocardiographic PWD. C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell, neutrophil and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were measured in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19. RESULTS: PWD, white blood cell, NLR and CRP levels were significantly higher in the COVID-19 group than the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between PWD and CRP level (rs = 0.510, P < 0.001) and NLR in COVID-19 group (rs = 0.302, P = 0.001). In their follow-up, 13 (9.3%) patients, 11 of whom were in the ICU, developed new atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSION: Our study showed for the first time in literature that the PWD, evaluated electrocardiographically in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19, was prolonged compared with normal healthy individuals. A positive correlation was found between PWD, CRP level and NLR. We believe that pretreatment evaluation of PWD in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19 would be beneficial for predicting atrial fibrillation risk.


Subject(s)
Action Potentials , Atrial Fibrillation/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Electrocardiography , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate , Adult , Aged , Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , Atrial Fibrillation/physiopathology , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
8.
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol ; 13(11): e008920, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975764

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who develop cardiac injury are reported to experience higher rates of malignant cardiac arrhythmias. However, little is known about these arrhythmias-their frequency, the underlying mechanisms, and their impact on mortality. METHODS: We extracted data from a registry (NCT04358029) regarding consecutive inpatients with confirmed COVID-19 who were receiving continuous telemetric ECG monitoring and had a definitive disposition of hospital discharge or death. Between patients who died versus discharged, we compared a primary composite end point of cardiac arrest from ventricular tachycardia/fibrillation or bradyarrhythmias such as atrioventricular block. RESULTS: Among 800 patients with COVID-19 at Mount Sinai Hospital with definitive dispositions, 140 patients had telemetric monitoring, and either died (52) or were discharged (88). The median (interquartile range) age was 61 years (48-74); 73% men; and ethnicity was White in 34%. Comorbidities included hypertension in 61%, coronary artery disease in 25%, ventricular arrhythmia history in 1.4%, and no significant comorbidities in 16%. Compared with discharged patients, those who died had elevated peak troponin I levels (0.27 versus 0.02 ng/mL) and more primary end point events (17% versus 4%, P=0.01)-a difference driven by tachyarrhythmias. Fatal tachyarrhythmias invariably occurred in the presence of severe metabolic imbalance, while atrioventricular block was largely an independent primary event. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 who die experience malignant cardiac arrhythmias more often than those surviving to discharge. However, these events represent a minority of cardiovascular deaths, and ventricular tachyarrhythmias are mainly associated with severe metabolic derangement. Registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT04358029.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate , Action Potentials , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/mortality , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Prognosis , Registries , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Young Adult
10.
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol ; 13(11): e008937, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-945067

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARs-CoV-2) has resulted in a global pandemic. Hydroxychloroquine±azithromycin have been widely used to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) despite a paucity of evidence regarding efficacy. The incidence of torsade de pointes remains unknown. Widespread use of these medications forced overwhelmed health care systems to search for ways to effectively monitor these patients while simultaneously trying to minimize health care provider exposure and use of personal protective equipment. METHODS: Patients with COVID-19 positive who received hydroxychloroquine±azithromycin across 13 hospitals between March 1 and April 15 were included in this study. A comprehensive search of the electronic medical records was performed using a proprietary python script to identify any mention of QT prolongation, ventricular tachy-arrhythmias and cardiac arrest. RESULTS: The primary outcome of torsade de pointes was observed in 1 (0.015%) out of 6476 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 receiving hydroxychloroquine±azithromycin. Sixty-seven (1.03%) had hydroxychloroquine±azithromycin held or discontinued due to an average QT prolongation of 60.5±40.5 ms from a baseline QTc of 473.7±35.9 ms to a peak QTc of 532.6±31.6 ms. Of these patients, hydroxychloroquine±azithromycin were discontinued in 58 patients (86.6%), while one or more doses of therapy were held in the remaining nine (13.4%). A simplified approach to monitoring for QT prolongation and arrythmia was implemented on April 5. There were no deaths related to the medications with the simplified monitoring approach and health care provider exposure was reduced. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of torsade de pointes is low in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 receiving hydroxychloroquine±azithromycin therapy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Azithromycin/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Delivery of Health Care , Heart Conduction System/drug effects , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Torsades de Pointes/chemically induced , Action Potentials/drug effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cardiotoxicity , Female , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate/drug effects , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , New York , Patient Safety , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Torsades de Pointes/diagnosis , Torsades de Pointes/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
11.
J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown) ; 22(3): 197-203, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-926890

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of the current study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion (PWD) as a predictor of atrial fibrillation in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19. In addition, the relationship between the PWD and inflammation parameters was investigated. METHODS: A total of 140 newly diagnosed COVID-19 patients and 140 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals were included in the study. The risk of atrial fibrillation was evaluated by calculating the electrocardiographic PWD. C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell, neutrophil and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were measured in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19. RESULTS: PWD, white blood cell, NLR and CRP levels were significantly higher in the COVID-19 group than the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between PWD and CRP level (rs = 0.510, P < 0.001) and NLR in COVID-19 group (rs = 0.302, P = 0.001). In their follow-up, 13 (9.3%) patients, 11 of whom were in the ICU, developed new atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSION: Our study showed for the first time in literature that the PWD, evaluated electrocardiographically in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19, was prolonged compared with normal healthy individuals. A positive correlation was found between PWD, CRP level and NLR. We believe that pretreatment evaluation of PWD in patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19 would be beneficial for predicting atrial fibrillation risk.


Subject(s)
Action Potentials , Atrial Fibrillation/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Electrocardiography , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate , Adult , Aged , Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , Atrial Fibrillation/physiopathology , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphocytes , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
13.
Electromagn Biol Med ; 39(4): 433-436, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814062

ABSTRACT

To help investigate the relationship between inflammatory and other symptoms of coronavirus and the protein-protein interactions (PPI) that occur between viral proteins and protein molecules of the host cell, I propose that the electrostatic discharge (ESD) exists including corona discharge to lead to ozone gas. I cite evidence in support of this hypothesis. I hope that the proposed will inspire new studies in finding effective treatments and vaccines for individuals with coronavirus disease in 2019. I suggest possible future studies that may lend more credibility to the proposed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus/physiology , Models, Biological , Static Electricity , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Heart Conduction System/drug effects , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Ozone/metabolism , Ozone/toxicity , Ozone Depletion , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology
15.
Trends Cardiovasc Med ; 30(8): 451-460, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713789

ABSTRACT

As the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic marches unrelentingly, more patients with cardiac arrhythmias are emerging due to the effects of the virus on the respiratory and cardiovascular (CV) systems and the systemic inflammation that it incurs, and also as a result of the proarrhythmic effects of COVID-19 pharmacotherapies and other drug interactions and the associated autonomic imbalance that enhance arrhythmogenicity. The most worrisome of all arrhythmogenic mechanisms is the QT prolonging effect of various anti-COVID pharmacotherapies that can lead to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the form of torsade des pointes and sudden cardiac death. It is therefore imperative to monitor the QT interval during treatment; however, conventional approaches to such monitoring increase the transmission risk for the staff and strain the health system. Hence, there is dire need for contactless monitoring and telemetry for inpatients, especially those admitted to the intensive care unit, as well as for outpatients needing continued management. In this context, recent technological advances have ushered in a new era in implementing digital health monitoring tools that circumvent these obstacles. All these issues are herein discussed and a large body of recent relevant data are reviewed.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/chemically induced , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Heart Conduction System/drug effects , Heart Conduction System/virology , Heart Rate/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Cardiotoxicity , Drug Interactions , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
16.
J Electrocardiol ; 62: 10-13, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662862

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study is to determine the frequency of fragmented QRS (FQRS) in patients with SARS - COV - 2. METHODS: A total of 125 consecutive patients over 20 years of age who were hospitalized for SARS - COV - 2 between 20th March 2020 and 18th May 2020 were included in the study. The data of the patients in the inpatient ward and in the intensive care unit were recorded separately. The duration of QRS and presence of FQRS were evaluated by two experienced cardiologists. The patients were divided into two groups as FQRS positive and FQRS negative considering presence of FQRS. Moreover, the frequency of FQRS in the patients in the inpatient ward and in the intensive care unit were compared with each other. RESULTS: FQRS was found in 24% of the patients who had SARS-COV-2. There was no difference between FQRS positive and negative groups in terms of age and gender. Heart rate was higher in FQRS positive group. C-reactive protein (7.25 ±â€¯6.65 mg/dl vs. 4.80 ±â€¯4.48 mg/dl; p = .02) levels were also significantly higher in the FQRS positive group. In patients with SARS-COV-2, intensive care unit requirement increased with increasing levels of troponin (p < .000). A positive correlation was detected between serum CRP levels and FQRS (r = 0.204, p = .024). CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of FQRS is high in patients with SARS - COV - 2. Serum CRP levels increase with increasing frequency of FQRS in patients with SARS - COV - 2 indicating that patients with FQRS are exposed to more inflammation. Presence of FQRS in SARS - COV - 2 patients may be useful in predicting cardiovascular outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Electrocardiography , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
17.
Heart Rhythm ; 17(9): 1434-1438, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593448

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Myriad manifestations of cardiovascular involvement have been described in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but there have been no reports of COVID-19 affecting the cardiac conduction system. The PR interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG) normally shortens with increasing heart rate (HR). The case of a patient with COVID-19 manifesting Mobitz type 1 atrioventricular (AV) block that normalized as the patient's condition improved prompted us to investigate PR interval behavior in patients with COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to characterize PR interval behavior in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and to correlate that behavior with clinical outcomes. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional cohort analysis of confirmed COVID-19 cases (March 26, 2020, to April 25, 2020). We reviewed pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 ECGs to characterize AV conduction by calculating the PR interval to HR (PR:HR) slope. Clinical endpoints were death or need for endotracheal intubation. RESULTS: ECGs from 75 patients (246 pre-COVID-19 ECGs and 246 COVID-19 ECGs) were analyzed for PR:HR slope. Of these patients, 38 (50.7%) showed the expected PR interval shortening with increasing HR (negative PR:HR slope), whereas 37 (49.3%) showed either no change (8 with PR:HR slope = 0) or paradoxical PR interval prolongation (29 with positive PR:HR slope) with increasing HR. Patients without PR interval shortening were more likely to die (11/37 [29.7%] vs 3/38 [7.9%]; P = .019) or require endotracheal intubation (16/37 [43.2%] vs 8/38 [21.1%]; P = .05) compared to patients with PR interval shortening. CONCLUSION: Half of patients with COVID-19 showed abnormal PR interval behavior (paradoxical prolongation or lack of shortening) with increasing HR. This finding was associated with increased risk of death and need for endotracheal intubation.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Heart Rate/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Electrocardiography , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Kardiologiia ; 60(5): 4-8, 2020 May 04.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593095

ABSTRACT

The beginning of 2020 was characterized by the development of a new coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19). Information about the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical and laboratory diagnostics, as well as prevention and therapy for this disease is constantly being expanded and reviewed. The COVID-19 pandemic creates the need for the emergence of new conditions of specialized care for patients with heart rhythm and conduction disorders [1]. These recommendations are intended for general practitioners, internists, cardiologists, electrophysiologists/arrhythmologists, cardiovascular surgeons, functional diagnostics doctors, anesthesiologists-resuscitators, laboratory diagnostics specialists, health care organizers in the system of organizations and healthcare institutions that provide specialized care to patients with heart rhythm and conduction disorders.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/therapy , Cardiac Conduction System Disease/diagnosis , Cardiac Conduction System Disease/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Heart Conduction System/physiopathology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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