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1.
Physiol Rev ; 102(1): 1-6, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554572
3.
J Artif Organs ; 23(3): 292-295, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453765

ABSTRACT

A 71-year-old man undergoing hemodialysis (HD) was admitted to our hospital with congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonia. After admission, ultrafiltration with HD was urgently performed because of a lack of respiratory improvement despite the use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. During HD, cerebral regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) was monitored by INVOS 5100c oxygen saturation monitor (Covidien Japan, Japan) to evaluate changes in tissue oxygenation. At HD initiation, cerebral rSO2 was very low at 34% under the fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FiO2) of 0.4. Ultrafiltration was performed at the rate of 0.5 L/h thereafter, cerebral rSO2 gradually improved even as inhaling oxygen concentration decreased. At the end of HD, cerebral rSO2 improved at 40% under a FiO2 of 0.28 as excess body fluid was removed. After pneumonia and CHF improved, he was discharged. Reports of the association between cerebral oxygenation and acute CHF status in patients undergoing HD are limited; therefore, in our experience with this case, cerebral oxygenation deteriorated with the CHF status but was improved by adequate body-fluid management during HD.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , Heart Failure/complications , Oxygen Consumption/physiology , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , Heart Failure/metabolism , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic , Renal Insufficiency/complications , Renal Insufficiency/metabolism
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5458-5473, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272201

ABSTRACT

Kawasaki-like disease (KLD) and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) are considered as challenges for pediatric patients under the age of 18 infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A systematic search was performed on July 2, 2020, and updated on December 1, 2020, to identify studies on KLD/MIS-C associated with COVID-19. The databases of Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and Scholar were searched. The hospitalized children with a presentation of Kawasaki disease (KD), KLD, MIS-C, or inflammatory shock syndromes were included. A total number of 133 children in 45 studies were reviewed. A total of 74 (55.6%) cases had been admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Also, 49 (36.8%) patients had required respiratory support, of whom 31 (23.3%) cases had required mechanical ventilation/intubation, 18 (13.5%) cases had required other oxygen therapies. In total, 79 (59.4%) cases had been discharged from hospitals, 3 (2.2%) had been readmitted, 9 (6.7%) had been hospitalized at the time of the study, and 9 (6.7%) patients had expired due to the severe heart failure, shock, brain infarction. Similar outcomes had not been reported in other patients. Approximately two-thirds of the children with KLD associated with COVID-19 had been admitted to PICUs, around one-fourth of them had required mechanical ventilation/intubation, and even some of them had been required readmissions. Therefore, physicians are strongly recommended to monitor children that present with the characteristics of KD during the pandemic as they can be the dominant manifestations in children with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Brain Infarction/complications , COVID-19/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Shock/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Brain Infarction/diagnostic imaging , Brain Infarction/mortality , Brain Infarction/virology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Heart Failure/diagnostic imaging , Heart Failure/mortality , Heart Failure/virology , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/mortality , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Shock/diagnostic imaging , Shock/mortality , Shock/virology , Survival Analysis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology
5.
J Card Surg ; 36(9): 3405-3409, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258956

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) affected 125 million people worldwide and caused 2.7 million deaths. Some comorbidities are associated with worse prognosis and left ventricular assist device (LVAD) recipients are probably part of this high-risk population. We report a 31-year-old male patient who developed COVID-19 during LVAD implantation. His postoperative period was complicated by severe pneumonia and mechanical ventilation (MV) leading to right ventricular failure (RVF) and inotrope necessity. He experienced multiple complications, but eventually recovered. We present a systematic review of LVAD recipients and COVID-19. Among 14 patients, the mean age was 62.7 years, 78.5% were male. A total of 5 patients (35.7%) required MV and 3 patients (21.4%) died. A total of 2 patients (14.2%) had thromboembolic events. This case and systematic review suggest LVAD recipients are at particular risk of unfavorable outcomes and they may be more susceptible to RVF in the setting of COVID-19, particularly during perioperative period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Heart-Assist Devices , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right , Adult , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/therapy , Heart-Assist Devices/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
6.
Int J Rehabil Res ; 44(3): 200-204, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242126

ABSTRACT

During the nationwide state of emergency, many hospitals could not provide outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for cardiac disease patients in order to minimize coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) incidence. The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectories of frailty, physical function and physical activity levels due to interruption and resumption of outpatient cardiac rehabilitation by COVID-19 in elderly heart failure patients. Fifteen patients who did not attend outpatient cardiac rehabilitation during the state of emergency but resumed it after the state of emergency were included. Frailty, physical function and physical activity levels were assessed with the Kihon checklist (KCL), various tests including short physical performance battery (SPPB), and life space assessment (LSA), respectively. Objective parameters were measured at three points; before and after the nationwide state of emergency in Japan and 3 months after resuming outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. The post-state of emergency KCL score was significantly higher than the pre-state of emergency score (P = 0.03), whereas there was no significant difference in KCL between post-state of emergency and 3 months after cardiac rehabilitation resumption. SPPB and LSA scores did not change significantly between pre- and post-state of emergency. The changes in LSA from post-state of emergency to 3 months after cardiac rehabilitation resumption tended to correlate with changes in KCL (r = -0.71, P = 0.11). We demonstrated that frailty status deteriorated significantly in elderly heart failure patients whose outpatient cardiac rehabilitation was interrupted due to COVID-19. In addition, the frailty status showed no significant improvement after 3 months of resuming cardiac rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Exercise , Frailty/complications , Heart Failure/rehabilitation , Retention in Care , Aged , Female , Frail Elderly , Geriatric Assessment , Heart Failure/complications , Humans , Outpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume
8.
J Heart Lung Transplant ; 40(9): 926-935, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233437

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 continues to inflict significant morbidity and mortality, particularly on patients with preexisting health conditions. The clinical course, outcomes, and significance of immunosuppression regimen in heart transplant recipients with COVID-19 remains unclear. METHODS: We included the first 99 heart transplant recipients at participating centers with COVID-19 and followed patients until resolution. We collected baseline information, symptoms, laboratory studies, vital signs, and outcomes for included patients. The association of immunosuppression regimens at baseline with severe disease were compared using logistic regression, adjusting for age and time since transplant. RESULTS: The median age was 60 years, 25% were female, and 44% were white. The median time post-transplant to infection was 5.6 years. Overall, 15% died, 64% required hospital admission, and 7% remained asymptomatic. During the course of illness, only 57% of patients had a fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms were common. Tachypnea, oxygen requirement, elevated creatinine and inflammatory markers were predictive of severe course. Age ≥ 60 was associated with higher risk of death and the use of the combination of calcineurin inhibitor, antimetabolite, and prednisone was associated with more severe disease compared to the combination of calcineurin inhibitor and antimetabolite alone (adjusted OR = 7.3, 95% CI 1.8-36.2). Among hospitalized patients, 30% were treated for secondary infection, acute kidney injury was common and 17% required new renal replacement therapy. CONCLUSIONS: We present the largest study to date of heart transplant patients with COVID-19 showing common atypical presentations and a high case fatality rate of 24% among hospitalized patients and 16% among symptomatic patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Failure/surgery , Heart Transplantation , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
9.
Recenti Prog Med ; 112(5): 378-386, 2021 05.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232491

ABSTRACT

High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) are an oxygen therapy device developed in the last years for the treatment of patients with acute or acute on chronic hypoxemic respiratory failure with different etiology and severity (including covid-19 pneumonia). HFNC combine the possibility of delivering high flows of gases, actively humidified and heated, with the use of a comfortable nasal interface, resulting generally well tolerated by most patients. In light of these characteristics, together with the simplicity of use and versatility, they have spread not only in intensive and semi-intensive care units but also in general medical ward in which they can play an important role in the treatment of elderly, frail patients with comorbidity where other more aggressive and invasive methods of ventilations are not indicated or not practicable.


Subject(s)
Cannula , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/instrumentation , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Acidosis, Respiratory/complications , Acidosis, Respiratory/therapy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Equipment Design , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Hypoxia/complications , Hypoxia/therapy , Internal Medicine , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Palliative Care , Pulmonary Edema/complications , Pulmonary Edema/therapy , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications
10.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 118, 2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225774

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, the hypothesis that angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) increased the risk and/or severity of the disease was widely spread. Consequently, in many hospitals, these drugs were discontinued as a "precautionary measure". We aimed to assess whether the in-hospital discontinuation of ARBs or ACEIs, in real-life conditions, was associated with a reduced risk of death as compared to their continuation and also to compare head-to-head the continuation of ARBs with the continuation of ACEIs. METHODS: Adult patients with a PCR-confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 requiring admission during March 2020 were consecutively selected from 7 hospitals in Madrid, Spain. Among them, we identified outpatient users of ACEIs/ARBs and divided them in two cohorts depending on treatment discontinuation/continuation at admission. Then, they were followed-up until discharge or in-hospital death. An intention-to-treat survival analysis was carried out and hazard ratios (HRs), and their 95%CIs were computed through a Cox regression model adjusted for propensity scores of discontinuation and controlled by potential mediators. RESULTS: Out of 625 ACEI/ARB users, 340 (54.4%) discontinued treatment. The in-hospital mortality rates were 27.6% and 27.7% in discontinuation and continuation cohorts, respectively (HR=1.01; 95%CI 0.70-1.46). No difference in mortality was observed between ARB and ACEI discontinuation (28.6% vs. 27.1%, respectively), while a significantly lower mortality rate was found among patients who continued with ARBs (20.8%, N=125) as compared to those who continued with ACEIs (33.1%, N=136; p=0.03). The head-to-head comparison (ARB vs. ACEI continuation) yielded an adjusted HR of 0.52 (95%CI 0.29-0.93), being especially notorious among males (HR=0.34; 95%CI 0.12-0.93), subjects older than 74 years (HR=0.46; 95%CI 0.25-0.85), and patients with obesity (HR=0.22; 95%CI 0.05-0.94), diabetes (HR=0.36; 95%CI 0.13-0.97), and heart failure (HR=0.12; 95%CI 0.03-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: The discontinuation of ACEIs/ARBs at admission did not improve the in-hospital survival. On the contrary, the continuation with ARBs was associated with a trend to a reduced mortality as compared to their discontinuation and to a significantly lower mortality risk as compared to the continuation with ACEIs, particularly in high-risk patients.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , Female , Heart Failure/complications , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
11.
G Ital Cardiol (Rome) ; 22(5): 363-375, 2021 May.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219383

ABSTRACT

In over a year, the COVID-19 pandemic caused 2.69 million deaths and 122 million infections. Social isolation and distancing measures have been the only prevention available for months. Scientific research has done a great deal of work, developing in a few months safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19. In the European Union, nowadays, four vaccines have been authorized for use: Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, ChAdOx1 (AstraZeneca/Oxford), Janssen (Johnson & Johnson), and three others are currently under rolling review.Vaccine allocation policy is crucial to optimize the advantage of treatment preferring people with the highest risk of contagion. These days the priority in the vaccination program is of particular importance since it has become clear that the number of vaccines is not sufficient for the entire Italian population in the short term. Cardiovascular diseases are frequently associated with severe COVID-19 infections, leading to the worst prognosis. The elderly population suffering from cardiovascular diseases is, therefore, to be considered a particularly vulnerable population. However, age cannot be considered the only discriminating factor because in the young-adult population suffering from severe forms of heart disease, the prognosis, if affected by COVID-19, is particularly ominous and these patients should have priority access to the vaccination program. The aim of this position paper is to establish a consensus on a priority in the vaccination of COVID-19 among subjects suffering from different cardiovascular diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Consensus , Age Factors , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiology , Coronary Disease/complications , Disease Vectors , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Transplantation , Heart Valve Diseases/complications , Humans , Hypertension, Pulmonary/complications , Italy/epidemiology , Prognosis , Renal Insufficiency/complications , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Societies, Medical , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
12.
N Engl J Med ; 384(17): 1586-1587, 2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211319
13.
Transplant Proc ; 53(4): 1224-1226, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203315

ABSTRACT

The cardiac effects of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) include myocarditis, takotsubo cardiomyopathy, pericardial effusion, and cardioembolic events in the general population. The effects of SARS-CoV-2 in heart transplant patients are unclear. We describe a case of myocarditis in the transplanted heart that responded to methylprednisolone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Heart Transplantation , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/pharmacology , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Myocarditis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transplantation, Homologous , Ventricular Function, Left/drug effects
14.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(4): 425-442, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188209

ABSTRACT

The emergence of data from clinical trials of biologics, the approval of new biologics, and our improved understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis have increased the therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Biologics currently approved for the treatment of psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, interleukin (IL)-17 inhibitors, ustekinumab (an IL-12/23 inhibitor), and IL-23 inhibitors. Data from clinical trials and studies of the safety and efficacy of biologics provide essential information for the personalization of patient care. We discuss the benefits and disadvantages of biologics as a first-line treatment choice, update treatment recommendations according to current evidence, and propose psoriasis treatment algorithms. Our discussion includes the following comorbid conditions: psoriatic arthritis, multiple sclerosis, congestive heart failure, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis B, nonmelanoma skin cancer, lymphoma, and latent tuberculosis. We make evidence-based treatment recommendations for special populations, including pediatric patients, patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), and pregnant and breastfeeding patients with psoriasis. Ultimately, individualized recommendations that consider patient preferences, disease severity, comorbid conditions, and additional risk factors should be offered to patients and updated as new trial data emerges.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Heart Failure/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications , Latent Tuberculosis/complications , Lymphoma/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Skin Neoplasms/complications
15.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 9: 23247096211009412, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1186542

ABSTRACT

A 67-year-old male was admitted with shortness of breath and diarrhea. His COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction test was positive, and he was found to be in acute heart failure. Troponin levels were elevated, echocardiogram showed ejection fraction of 24%, and his electrocardiogram was normal. Inflammatory markers were elevated. Further testing revealed suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone and elevated free thyroxine (T4). Differential diagnosis at this point included possible myocarditis from the viral illness, exacerbation of heart failure from the viral infection or from thyrotoxicosis was considered. Patient's heart failure improved with initiation of heart failure therapies; however, biochemically, his thyroid function tests (TFTs) did not improve, despite empiric methimazole. Thyroid antibody tests were unremarkable. Thyroid ultrasound showed mildly enlarged thyroid gland with no increased vascularity and 5-mm bilateral cysts. Thyroid dysfunction was attributed to subacute thyroiditis from COVID-19, methimazole was tapered, and prednisone was initiated. The patient's TFTs improved. With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, it is imperative that clinicians keep a broad differential in individuals presenting with heart failure, and obtaining baseline TFTs may be reasonable. Rapid treatment of the underlying thyroiditis is important in these patients to improve the cardiovascular outcomes. In our experience, steroid therapy showed a rapid improvement in the TFTs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Thyroiditis, Subacute/complications , Thyroiditis, Subacute/diagnosis , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Diagnosis, Differential , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroiditis, Subacute/drug therapy
16.
Transplant Proc ; 53(4): 1219-1223, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164556

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in many challenges in patient care, especially among high-risk populations such as heart transplant recipients. Patients with heart transplant experience a significantly higher mortality rate with COVID-19 infection, and management is based on extrapolation from clinical trials done on nontransplant patients and from clinical experience. Here we report 4 cases of patients with heart transplant who presented with COVID-19 infection in late 2020. Patients presented with symptoms similar to those seen in the general population. All 4 patients were admitted to the hospital, and they were all treated with dexamethasone. In addition, 2 patients received remdesivir. Immunosuppressive medications were adjusted to maintain adequate levels of immunosuppression but at the same time allow for an adequate immune response against the infection. All patients were discharged alive from the hospital. We then performed a literature review on studies that included heart transplant patients who developed the infection and developed suggestions for a standardized management approach, which we share in this article.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Heart Transplantation , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , Heart Failure/complications , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Withholding Treatment
18.
J Hypertens ; 39(2): 376-380, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114884

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The burst of COVID-19 epidemics in Italy prompted the Italian Society of Hypertension to start an observational study to explore the characteristics of the hospitalized victims of the disease. The current analysis aimed to investigate the predictors of healing among Italian COVID-19 patients. We also assessed the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on the outcome. METHODS: We designed a cross-sectional, observational, multicenter, nationwide survey in Italy to explore the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection. We analyzed information from 2446 charts of Italian patients admitted for certified COVID-19 in 27 hospitals. Healing from COVID-19 infection, defined as two consecutive negative swabs, was reported in 544 patients (22.2%), 95% of them were hospitalized. RESULTS: Age and Charlson Comorbidity Index were significantly lower in healing compared with nonhealing patients (63 ±â€Š15 vs. 69 ±â€Š15 and 2 ±â€Š2 vs. 3 ±â€Š2, both P < 0.05). In multivariable regression model, predictors of healing were younger age (OR: 0.99; 95% CI 0.98-0.99, P = 0.0001), absence of chronic kidney disease (OR: 0.35; 95% CI 0.17-0.70, P = 0.003) or heart failure (OR: 0.44; 95% CI, 0.28-0.70, P = 0.001). In the subgroup of patients suffering from hypertension and/or heart failure (n = 1498), no differences were observed in the use of ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that younger age and absence of comorbidities play a major role in determining healing in patients with COVID-19. No effects of ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on the outcome was reported.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Analysis of Variance , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , Chronic Disease , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 73, 2021 02 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105701

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis patients with COVID-19 have been reported to be at higher risk for death than the general population. Several prognostic factors have been identified in the studies from Asian, European or American countries. This is the first national Lebanese study assessing the factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 mortality in hemodialysis patients. METHODS: This is an observational study that included all chronic hemodialysis patients in Lebanon who were tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 from 31st March to 1st November 2020. Data on demographics, comorbidities, admission to hospital and outcome were collected retrospectively from the patients' medical records. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess risk factors for mortality. RESULTS: A total of 231 patients were included. Mean age was 61.46 ± 13.99 years with a sex ratio of 128 males to 103 females. Around half of the patients were diabetics, 79.2% presented with fever. A total of 115 patients were admitted to the hospital, 59% of them within the first day of diagnosis. Hypoxia was the major reason for hospitalization. Death rate was 23.8% after a median duration of 6 (IQR, 2 to 10) days. Adjusted regression analysis showed a higher risk for death among older patients (odds ratio = 1.038; 95% confidence interval: 1.013, 1.065), patients with heart failure (odds ratio = 4.42; 95% confidence interval: 2.06, 9.49), coronary artery disease (odds ratio = 3.27; 95% confidence interval: 1.69, 6.30), multimorbidities (odds ratio = 1.593; 95% confidence interval: 1.247, 2.036), fever (odds ratio = 6.66; 95% confidence interval: 1.94, 27.81), CRP above 100 mg/L (odds ratio = 4.76; 95% confidence interval: 1.48, 15.30), and pneumonia (odds ratio = 19.18; 95% confidence interval: 6.47, 56.83). CONCLUSIONS: This national study identified older age, coronary artery disease, heart failure, multimorbidities, fever and pneumonia as risk factors for death in patients with COVID-19 on chronic hemodialysis. The death rate was comparable to other countries and estimated at 23.8%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Multimorbidity , Renal Dialysis , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Coronary Disease/complications , Critical Care , Dementia/complications , Female , Fever/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Hospitalization , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications
20.
Am J Transplant ; 20(7): 1925-1929, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096663

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 infection can be seen as a single disease, but it also affects patients with relevant comorbidities who may have an increased risk of a severe course of infection. In this report, we present a 77-year-old patient with a heart transplant receiving relevant immunosuppressive therapy who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 after several days of dyspnea, dry cough, and light general symptoms. Computed tomography confirmed interstitial pneumonia. The patient received antiviral therapy with hydroxychloroquine and showed no further deterioration of the clinical state. After 12 days of hospitalization, the patient was released; he was SARS-CoV-2 negative and completely asymptomatic.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Transplantation , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Heart Failure/surgery , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Male , Pandemics , Radiography, Thoracic , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
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