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Int J Med Inform ; 161: 104717, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1734453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the spread of COVID-19, telemedicine solutions became crucial to release continuous and remote assistance to chronic patients. The rapid transition to telemedicine solutions did not allow a complete assessment of the user experience by both patients and medical personnel. Despite the well-known benefits in remote care, the lack of usability evaluation of already existing technologies for the vital signs measurement has emerged. A telemedicine platform must match video communication between patients and the medical staff with the possibility to measure vital parameters. Furthermore, technological assistance may overcome the unfamiliarity with telemedicine and drastically reduce the learning time for both patients and medical personnel. OBJECTIVES: The research work presents a method to improve the user experience of a telemedicine service based on the combination of televisits and telemonitoring with wearable sensors for heart failure patients. Skilled technological staff is proposed by the presented method to lead the learning process of both medical personnel and patients in order to reach a high level of usability in less than 6 months. METHODS: The proposed method is composed of 5 steps: identification of technological staff and end users; selection of the telemedicine platform; design of questionnaires for usability analysis; training of clinicians and patients; final usability evaluation of the telemedicine platform by means of customized satisfaction questionnaires and Post-Study System Usability Questionnaires (PSSUQs). The methodological approach has been tested in collaboration with a heart failure clinic by involving 5 physicians, 5 nurses, 15 heart failure patients, a research engineer and 4 technicians. A platform with 3 wearable sensors has been chosen: a wireless thermometer, a finger pulse-oximeter and an undershirt have been used for the detection of ECG trace. While these devices allowed asynchronous measurements of physiological data, scheduled televisits have been used for direct communication between physicians and patients. RESULTS: Satisfaction questionnaires of patients and clinicians reached respectively 65.18% and 65.83%, while PSSUQ scores were respectively 91.73% and 81.70%. Both groups of end users confirmed a good level of usability and their satisfaction about the ease of use and the perceived quality of the instrumentation. Moreover, 73% of patients did not require help from caregivers to use the kit of sensors. The results have been reached in 5.5 months according to the aim defined initially. Research engineers have played a crucial role in helping clinicians and patients to improve the user experience with the telemedicine platform. CONCLUSIONS: The high level of usability and satisfaction confirmed that the proposed methodological approach helps to learn the technological features of the telemedicine platforms, which are based on different types of technology, such as web applications, wearable sensors and virtual calls. The positive results with heart failure patients encouraged to plan further research studies by using the designed method with other categories of chronic patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Telemedicine , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Software , Telemedicine/methods
3.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(7): e023935, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714485

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a rapid implementation of telemedicine into clinical practice. This study examined whether early outpatient follow-up via telemedicine is as effective as in-person visits for reducing 30-day readmissions in patients with heart failure. Methods and Results Using electronic health records from a large health system, we included patients with heart failure living in North Carolina (N=6918) who were hospitalized between March 16, 2020 and March 14, 2021. All-cause readmission within 30 days after discharge was examined using weighted logistic regression models. Overall, 7.6% (N=526) of patients received early telemedicine follow-up, 38.8% (N=2681) received early in-person follow-up, and 53.6% (N=3711) did not receive follow-up within 14 days of discharge. Compared with patients without early follow-up, those who received early follow-up were younger, were more likely to be Medicare beneficiaries, had more comorbidities, and were less likely to live in an disadvantaged neighborhood. Relative to in-person visits, those with telemedicine follow-up were of similar age, sex, and race but with generally fewer comorbidities. Overall, the 30-day readmission rate (19.0%) varied among patients who received telemedicine visits (15.0%), in-person visits (14.0%), or no follow-up (23.1%). After covariate adjustment, patients who received either telemedicine (odds ratio [OR], 0.55; 95% CI, 0.44-0.72) or in-person (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.45-0.60) visits were similarly less likely to be readmitted within 30 days compared with patients with no follow-up. Conclusions During the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of telemedicine visits for early follow-up increased rapidly. Patients with heart failure who received outpatient follow-up either via telemedicine or in-person had better outcomes than those who received no follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics , Patient Readmission , United States
4.
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother ; 8(2): 149-156, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706743

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) increases the risk of developing heart failure (HF). The effect of spironolactone on BP of patients at risk of developing HF is yet to be determined. To evaluate the effect of spironolactone on the BP of patients at risk for HF and whether renin can predict spironolactone's effect. METHODS AND RESULTS: HOMAGE (Heart OMics in Aging) was a prospective multicentre randomized open-label blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial including 527 patients at risk for developing HF randomly assigned to either spironolactone (25-50 mg/day) or usual care alone for a maximum of 9 months. Sitting BP was assessed at baseline, Months 1 and 9 (or last visit). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), mixed effects models, and structural modelling equations was used. The median (percentile25-75) age was 73 (69-79) years, 26% were female, and >75% had history of hypertension. Overall, the baseline BP was 142/78 mmHg. Patients with higher BP were older, more likely to have diabetes and less likely to have coronary artery disease, had greater left ventricular mass (LVM), and left atrial volume (LAV). Compared with usual care, by last visit, spironolactone changed SBP by -10.3 (-13.0 to -7.5) mmHg and DBP by -3.2 (-4.8 to -1.7) mmHg (P < 0.001 for both). A higher proportion of patients on spironolactone had controlled BP <130/80 mmHg (36 vs. 26%; P = 0.014). Lower baseline renin levels predicted a greater response to spironolactone (interactionP = 0.041). CONCLUSION: Spironolactone had a clinically important BP-lowering effect. Spironolactone should be considered for lowering blood pressure in patients who are at risk of developing HF.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Spironolactone , Aged , Blood Pressure , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Spironolactone/therapeutic use
5.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2670, 2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704157

ABSTRACT

The prognosis of heart failure (HF) patients is determined to a decisive extent by comorbidities. The present study investigates the association between a broad spectrum of diseases and the occurrence of HF in a large collective of outpatients. This retrospective case control study assessed the prevalence of 37 cardiac and extracardiac diseases in patients with an initial diagnosis of heart failure (ICD-10: I50) in 1,274 general practices in Germany between January 2005 and December 2019. The study is based on the Disease Analyzer database (IQVIA), which contains drug prescriptions, diagnoses, and basic medical and demographic data. Patients with and without heart failure were matched by sex, age, and index year. Hazard regression models were conducted to evaluate the association between different disease entities and heart failure. The present study included 162,246 patients with heart failure and 162,246 patients without heart failure. Mean age [SD] was 73.7 [12.1] years; 52.6% were women. Out of 37 predefined diagnoses, 36 were more prevalent in HF patients. The highest prevalence was primary hypertension (63.4% in HF patients vs. 53.3% in controls, p < 0.001) followed by lipid metabolism disorders (34.6% in HF patients vs. 29.1% in HF patients p < 0.001) and diabetes mellitus type II (32.2% in HF patients vs. 25.2% in controls, p < 0.001). In the regression analysis, 19 diseases were significantly associated with heart failure. Non-cardiovascular diagnoses strongly associated with HF were obesity (HR = 1.46), chronic bronchitis and COPD (HR = 1.41), gout (HR: 1.41), and chronic kidney disease (HR = 1.27). In the present study, we identified a variety of cardiac and extracardiac diseases associated with heart failure. Our data underscore the immense importance of comorbidities, even as early as at the stage of initial diagnosis of heart failure.


Subject(s)
Comorbidity , Heart Failure , Models, Cardiovascular , Registries , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Germany , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
6.
Int J Cardiol ; 348: 95-101, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620713

ABSTRACT

Over the last three decades, increased attention has been given to the representation of historically underrepresented groups within the landscape of pivotal clinical trials. However, recent events (i.e., coronavirus pandemic) have laid bare the potential continuation of historic inequities in available clinical trials and studies aimed at the care of broad patient populations. Anecdotally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) has not been immune to these disparities. Within this review, we examine and discuss recent landmark CVD trials, with a specific focus on the representation of Blacks within several critically foundational heart failure clinical trials tied to contemporary treatment strategies and drug approvals. We also discuss solutions for inequities within the landscape of cardiovascular trials. Building a more diverse clinical trial workforce coupled with intentional efforts to increase clinical trial diversity will advance equity in cardiovascular care.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Drug Approval , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans
7.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(1): 75-82, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589152

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reduced hospital admission rates for heart failure (HF) and evidence of increased in-hospital mortality were reported during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was to apply a machine learning (ML)-based mortality prediction model to examine whether the latter is attributable to differing case mixes and exceeds expected mortality rates. METHODS AND RESULTS: Inpatient cases with a primary discharge diagnosis of HF non-electively admitted to 86 German Helios hospitals between 01/01/2016 and 08/31/2020 were identified. Patients with proven or suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection were excluded. ML-based models were developed, tuned, and tested using cases of 2016-2018 (n = 64,440; randomly split 75%/25%). Extreme gradient boosting showed the best model performance indicated by a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.882 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.872-0.893). The model was applied on data sets of 2019 and 2020 (n = 28,556 cases) and the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) was computed as the observed to expected death ratio. Observed mortality rates were 5.84% (2019) and 6.21% (2020), HSMRs based on an individual case-based mortality probability were 100.0 (95% CI: 93.3-107.2; p = 1.000) for 2019 and 99.3 (95% CI: 92.5-106.4; p = .850) for 2020. Within subgroups of age or hospital volume, there were no significant differences between observed and expected deaths. When stratified for pandemic phases, no excess death during the COVID-19 pandemic was observed. CONCLUSION: Applying an ML algorithm to calculate expected inpatient mortality based on administrative data, there was no excess death above expected event rates in HF patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals , Humans , Machine Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Int J Cardiol ; 350: 125-129, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, admissions for cardiovascular disease, including Heart Failure (HF), were reduced. Patients hospitalised for HF were sicker and with increased in-hospital mortality. So far, whether following waves had a different impact on HF patients is unknown. METHODS: All consecutive patients hospitalised for acute heart failure during three different COVID-19 related national lockdowns were analysed. The lockdown periods were defined according to Government guidelines as 23/3/2020 to 4/7/2020 (First Lockdown), 4/11/2020 to 2/12/2020 (Second Lockdown) and 5/1/2021 to 28/2/2021 (Third Lockdown). RESULTS: Overall, 184 patients hospitalised for HF were included in the study, 95 during the 1st lockdown, 30 during the 2nd lockdown and 59 during the 3rd lockdown. Across the three groups had comparable clinical characteristics, comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. Specialist in-hospital care was uninterrupted during the pandemic showing comparable mortality rates (p = 0.10). Although medical therapy for HF was comparable between the three lockdowns, a significantly higher proportion of patients received Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitors (ARNI) in the second and third lockdowns (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Although public health approaches changed throughout the pandemic, the clinical characteristics and outcomes of HF patients were consistent across different waves. For patients hospitalised in the subsequent waves, a more rapid optimization of medical therapy was observed during hospitalization. Particular attention should be devoted to prevent collateral cardiovascular damage during public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Communicable Disease Control , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(24): e022913, 2021 12 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566423

ABSTRACT

Background Currently, there is limited research on the prognostic value of NT-proBNP (N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide) as a biomarker in COVID-19. We proposed the a priori hypothesis that an elevated NT-proBNP concentration at admission is associated with increased in-hospital mortality. Methods and Results In this prospective, observational cohort study of the American Heart Association's COVID-19 Cardiovascular Disease Registry, 4675 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were divided into normal and elevated NT-proBNP cohorts by standard age-adjusted heart failure thresholds, as well as separated by quintiles. Patients with elevated NT-proBNP (n=1344; 28.7%) were older, with more cardiovascular risk factors, and had a significantly higher rate of in-hospital mortality (37% versus 16%; P<0.001) and shorter median time to death (7 versus 9 days; P<0.001) than those with normal values. Analysis by quintile of NT-proBNP revealed a steep graded relationship with mortality (7.1%-40.2%; P<0.001). NT-proBNP was also associated with major adverse cardiac events, intensive care unit admission, intubation, shock, and cardiac arrest (P<0.001 for each). In subgroup analyses, NT-proBNP, but not prior heart failure, was associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality. Adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors with presenting vital signs, an elevated NT-proBNP was associated with 2-fold higher adjusted odds of death (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.23; 95% CI, 1.80-2.76), and the log-transformed NT-proBNP with other biomarkers projected a 21% increased risk of death for each 2-fold increase (adjusted OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08-1.34). Conclusions Elevated NT-proBNP levels on admission for COVID-19 are associated with an increased risk of in-hospital mortality and other complications in patients with and without heart failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Hospital Mortality , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Humans , Prognosis , Prospective Studies
10.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis ; 69: 47-53, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536982

ABSTRACT

Heart failure (HF) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The increasing prevalence of HF and inpatient HF hospitalization has a considerable burden on healthcare cost and utilization. The recognition that hemodynamic changes in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and left atrial pressure precede the signs and symptoms of HF has led to interest in hemodynamic guided HF therapy as an approach to allow earlier intervention during a heart failure decompensation. Remote patient monitoring (RPM) utilizing telecommunication, cardiac implantable electronic device parameters and implantable hemodynamic monitors (IHM) have largely failed to demonstrate favorable outcomes in multicenter trials. However, one positive randomized clinical trial testing the CardioMEMS device (followed by Food and Drug Administration approval) has generated renewed interest in PAP monitoring in the HF population to decrease hospitalization and improve quality of life. The COVID-19 pandemic has also stirred a resurgence in the utilization of telehealth to which RPM using IHM may be complementary. The cost effectiveness of these monitors continues to be a matter of debate. Future iterations of devices aim to be smaller, less burdensome for the patient, less dependent on patient compliance, and less cumbersome for health care providers with the integration of artificial intelligence coupled with sophisticated data management and interpretation tools. Currently, use of IHM may be considered in advanced heart failure patients with the support of structured programs.


Subject(s)
Arterial Pressure , Atrial Function, Left , Atrial Pressure , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Hemodynamic Monitoring/instrumentation , Pulmonary Artery/physiopathology , Remote Sensing Technology/instrumentation , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Algorithms , COVID-19 , Diffusion of Innovation , Equipment Design , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Reproducibility of Results , Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
12.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 218, 2021 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503722

ABSTRACT

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors for heart failure, the prevalence of which is increasing worldwide. The aim of the review is to highlight the current perspectives of the pathophysiology of heart failure as it pertains to type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the proposed mechanistic bases, explaining the myocardial damage induced by diabetes-related stressors and other risk factors, i.e., cardiomyopathy in type 2 diabetes. We highlight the complex pathology of individuals with type 2 diabetes, including the relationship with chronic kidney disease, metabolic alterations, and heart failure. We also discuss the current criteria used for heart failure diagnosis and the gold standard screening tools for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Currently approved pharmacological therapies with primary use in type 2 diabetes and heart failure, and the treatment-guiding role of NT-proBNP are also presented. Finally, the influence of the presence of type 2 diabetes as well as heart failure on COVID-19 severity is briefly discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Disease Management , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Mass Screening/methods , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Heart Failure/blood , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Humans , Mass Screening/trends , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Prognosis
13.
Biomark Med ; 15(16): 1519-1528, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477716

ABSTRACT

Aim: In the present study, the relationship between D-dimer/fibrinogen ratio (DFR) and in-hospital outcomes was evaluated in patients with COVID-19 and a diagnosis of heart failure (HF). Materials & methods: In-hospital outcomes were compared in patients with high and low DFR values. Results: With regard to in-hospital outcomes, patients in the third tertile of DFR had a higher rate of mechanical ventilation, cardiogenic shock and death (p < 0.001). The length of ICU stay was longer in the third tertile group (p < 0.001). When evaluated together with infection markers, DFR was found to be an independent predictor of outcomes. Conclusion: DFR can be used as a prognostic marker in patients with COVID-19 with a diagnosis of HF, and perhaps more valuable than other infection markers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Heart Failure/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
14.
Clin Drug Investig ; 41(10): 907-915, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450031

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sacubitril-valsartan is effective in reducing the N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level of hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure, with a high acquisition cost compared with enalapril treatment. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the cost utility of sacubitril-valsartan compared with enalapril for acute decompensated heart failure treatment. METHODS: A Markov model was constructed to project the total costs, life-years, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of early initiation, and a 2-month delay of sacubitril-valsartan treatment and enalapril treatment in hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure over a lifetime horizon from a Thai healthcare system perspective. Clinical inputs were mainly derived from the PIONEER-HF and PARADIGM-HF trials, together with Thai epidemiological data. Cost data were based on the Thai population. All costs and outcomes were discounted at 3% annually. A series of sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS: Compared with enalapril, sacubitril-valsartan incurred a higher total cost per year (THB 42,994 [US$1367.48] vs THB 19,787 [US$629.37]), and it gained more QALYs (4.969 vs 4.755). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was THB 108,508/QALY (US$3451.26/QALY). Early initiation of sacubitril-valsartan treatment was more cost effective than delayed treatment. Sensitivity analyses revealed that at a level of willingness to pay of THB 160,000/QALY (US$5089/QALY), sacubitril-valsartan was a cost-effective strategy of about 60%. CONCLUSIONS: Sacubitril-valsartan is cost effective in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. However, the results are highly dependent on the long-term cardiovascular mortality, and they are applicable only to Thailand or countries with a similarly structured healthcare system. Long-term registries should be pursued to decrease the uncertainty around long-term mortality.


Subject(s)
Enalapril , Heart Failure , Aminobutyrates/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Biphenyl Compounds , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Drug Combinations , Enalapril/therapeutic use , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Stroke Volume , Tetrazoles/therapeutic use , Thailand , Valsartan
15.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(6): 4465-4483, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449921

ABSTRACT

Acute heart failure (AHF) affects millions of people worldwide, and it is a potentially life-threatening condition for which the cardiologist is more often brought into play. It is crucial to rapidly identify, among patients presenting with dyspnoea, those with AHF and to accurately stratify their risk, in order to define the appropriate setting of care, especially nowadays due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Furthermore, with physical examination being limited by personal protective equipment, the use of new alternative diagnostic and prognostic tools could be of extreme importance. In this regard, usage of biomarkers, especially when combined (a multimarker approach) is beneficial for establishment of an accurate diagnosis, risk stratification and post-discharge monitoring. This review highlights the use of both traditional biomarkers such as natriuretic peptides (NP) and troponin, and emerging biomarkers such as soluble suppression of tumourigenicity (sST2) and galectin-3 (Gal-3), from patients' emergency admission to discharge and follow-up, to improve risk stratification and outcomes in terms of mortality and rehospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Acute Disease , Aftercare , Biomarkers , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Circ Heart Fail ; 14(10): e008573, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443687

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An unprecedented shift to remote heart failure outpatient care occurred during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Given challenges inherent to remote care, we studied whether remote visits (video or telephone) were associated with different patient usage, clinician practice patterns, and outcomes. METHODS: We included all ambulatory cardiology visits for heart failure at a multisite health system from April 1, 2019, to December 31, 2019 (pre-COVID) or April 1, 2020, to December 31, 2020 (COVID era), resulting in 10 591 pre-COVID in-person, 7775 COVID-era in-person, 1009 COVID-era video, and 2322 COVID-era telephone visits. We used multivariable logistic and Cox proportional hazards regressions with propensity weighting and patient clustering to study ordering practices and outcomes. RESULTS: Compared with in-person visits, video visits were used more often by younger (mean 64.7 years [SD 14.5] versus 74.2 [14.1]), male (68.3% versus 61.4%), and privately insured (45.9% versus 28.9%) individuals (P<0.05 for all). Remote visits were more frequently used by non-White patients (35.8% video, 37.0% telephone versus 33.2% in-person). During remote visits, clinicians were less likely to order diagnostic testing (odds ratio, 0.20 [0.18-0.22] video versus in-person, 0.18 [0.17-0.19] telephone versus in-person) or prescribe ß-blockers (0.82 [0.68-0.99], 0.35 [0.26-0.47]), mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (0.69 [0.50-0.96], 0.48 [0.35-0.66]), or loop diuretics (0.67 [0.53-0.85], 0.45 [0.37-0.55]). During telephone visits, clinicians were less likely to prescribe ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitor/ARB (angiotensin receptor blockers)/ARNIs (angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors; 0.54 [0.40-0.72]). Telephone visits but not video visits were associated with higher rates of 90-day mortality (1.82 [1.14-2.90]) and nonsignificant trends towards higher rates of 90-day heart failure emergency department visits (1.34 [0.97-1.86]) and hospitalizations (1.36 [0.98-1.89]). CONCLUSIONS: Remote visits for heart failure care were associated with reduced diagnostic testing and guideline-directed medical therapy prescription. Telephone but not video visits were associated with increased 90-day mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiologists/trends , Heart Failure/therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Telemedicine/trends , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures/trends , Drug Prescriptions , Drug Utilization/trends , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Guideline Adherence/trends , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/mortality , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Telephone/trends , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Videoconferencing/trends
17.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(3): 677-690, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439022

ABSTRACT

Heart Failure (HF) is characterized by an elevated readmission rate, with almost 50% of events occurring after the first episode over the first 6 months of the post-discharge period. In this context, the vulnerable phase represents the period when patients elapse from a sub-acute to a more stabilized chronic phase. The lack of an accurate approach for each HF subtype is probably the main cause of the inconclusive data in reducing the trend of recurrent hospitalizations. Most care programs are based on the main diagnosis and the HF stages, but a model focused on the specific HF etiology is lacking. The HF clinic route based on the HF etiology and the underlying diseases responsible for HF could become an interesting approach, compared with the traditional programs, mainly based on non-specific HF subtypes and New York Heart Association class, rather than on detailed etiologic and epidemiological data. This type of care may reduce the 30-day readmission rates for HF, increase the use of evidence-based therapies, prevent the exacerbation of each comorbidity, improve patient compliance, and decrease the use of resources. For all these reasons, we propose a dedicated outpatient HF program with a daily practice scenario that could improve the early identification of symptom progression and the quality-of-life evaluation, facilitate the access to diagnostic and laboratory tools and improve the utilization of financial resources, together with optimal medical titration and management.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Heart Failure/therapy , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Patient Readmission , Prognosis
18.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 92(1)2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410356

ABSTRACT

We report a COVID-19 case with acute heart and kidney failure in a healthy young male. Echocardiography showed severe systolic and diastolic left ventricle dysfunction, with diffuse myocardial thickening. Cardiac MRI showed aspects of focal myocarditis, and hypertensive cardiomyopathy. Renal biopsy demonstrated limited acute tubular injury, and hypertensive kidney disease. Coronary angiography excluded critical stenoses. Unlike what we initially suspected, myocardial inflammation had a limited extent in our patient; severe hypertension causing cardiomyopathy and multi-organ damage, not diagnosed before, was primarily responsible for severe illness. Correct diagnosis and guidelines-directed treatment allowed a favorable course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiomyopathies , Heart Failure , Hypertension , Myocarditis , COVID-19/complications , Cardiomyopathies/diagnosis , Cardiomyopathies/diagnostic imaging , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/etiology , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Male , Myocarditis/diagnostic imaging , Myocarditis/etiology
19.
Clin Cardiol ; 44(9): 1263-1271, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400778

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the effect of melatonin supplementation on endothelial function in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). METHODS: This is an analysis of the MeHR trial, a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial with two parallel arms of 1:1. Oral 10 mg melatonin tablets or placebo was administered for 24 weeks. Deference in the percentage of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) after the intervention was the primary outcome. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients were included in the study (age: 62.7±10.3 years, 87.0% male, ejection fraction (EF): 28.6±8.1). After adjustment for baseline FMD and age, a statistically significant difference in post-treatment FMD in favor of the melatonin group was seen (estimated marginal means [95%CI], melatonin: 7.84% [6.69-8.98], placebo: 5.98% [4.84-7.12], p = .027). There was no significant difference in the mean of post-treatment systolic/diastolic blood pressure, serum total antioxidant capacity, and serum malondialdehyde (MDA) between groups. Subgroup analysis showed significant improvement in FMD and MDA in the melatonin group in nondiabetic patients, while no difference was seen between study groups in diabetic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Melatonin supplementation in HFrEF might improve endothelial function; however, this beneficial effect might not be seen in diabetic patients.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Melatonin , Dietary Supplements , Double-Blind Method , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Stroke Volume
20.
Europace ; 24(2): 256-267, 2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364793

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Remote patient monitoring (RPM) systems offer a promising alternative to conventional In-Clinic check-ups, hereby reducing unnecessary clinic visits. Especially with the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, this reduction is of paramount importance. Regarding the association between RPM and clinical outcomes, findings of previous studies have been inconsistent. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of partly substituting In-Clinic visits by RPM on clinical outcomes in implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study included 595 heart failure patients (LVEF ≤35%; NYHA Class II/III) implanted with an ICD compatible with the Boston Scientific LATITUDE™ system. Participants were randomized to RPM plus an annual In-Clinic visit or 3-6 months In-Clinic check-ups alone. The investigated endpoints after 2 years of follow-up included a composite of all-cause mortality and cardiac hospitalization, mortality and cardiac hospitalization as independent endpoints and ICD therapy. The incidence of mortality and hospitalization did not differ significantly as independent, nor as composite endpoint between the RPM and In-Clinic group (all Ps <0.05). The results were similar regarding ICD therapy, except for appropriate ICD therapy (odds ratio 0.50; 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.98; P = 0.04). Exploratory subgroup analyses indicated that the effect of RPM differs between patients with specific characteristics, i.e. ≥60 years and permanent atrial fibrillation (all Ps < 0.05). CONCLUSION: RPM is non-inferior to conventional In-Clinic visits regarding clinical outcomes. Routine In-Clinic follow-up may partly be substituted by RPM without jeopardizing safety and efficiency, and thus reducing unnecessary In-Clinic visits. CLINICALTRIALS.GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT01691586.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Defibrillators, Implantable , Heart Failure , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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