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1.
Nurs Manage ; 53(4): 26-33, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774423

ABSTRACT

Behaviors, treatments, and self-management strategies used by patients and caregivers at home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Readmission
2.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(6): e022625, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770080

ABSTRACT

Background Excess mortality from cardiovascular disease during the COVID-19 pandemic has been reported. The mechanism is unclear but may include delay or deferral of care, or differential treatment during hospitalization because of strains on hospital capacity. Methods and Results We used emergency department and inpatient data from a 12-hospital health system to examine changes in volume, patient age and comorbidities, treatment (right- and left-heart catheterization), and outcomes for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure (HF) during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with pre-COVID-19 (2018 and 2019), controlling for seasonal variation. We analyzed 27 427 emergency department visits or hospitalizations. Patient volume decreased during COVID-19 for both HF and AMI, but age, race, sex, and medical comorbidities were similar before and during COVID-19 for both groups. Acuity increased for AMI as measured by the proportion of patients with ST-segment elevation. There were no differences in right-heart catheterization for patients with HF or in left heart catheterization for patients with AMI. In-hospital mortality increased for AMI during COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR], 1.46; 95% CI, 1.21-1.76), particularly among the ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction subgroup (OR, 2.57; 95% CI, 2.24-2.96), but was unchanged for HF (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.89-1.16). Conclusions Cardiovascular volume decreased during COVID-19. Despite similar patient age and comorbidities and in-hospital treatments during COVID-19, mortality increased for patients with AMI but not patients with HF. Given that AMI is a time-sensitive condition, delay or deferral of care rather than changes in hospital care delivery may have led to worse cardiovascular outcomes during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Heart Failure , Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/etiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Missouri , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/mortality , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy
3.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(2): e0010134, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dengue virus (DENV) infection may be associated with increased risks of major adverse cardiovascular effect (MACE), but a large-scale study evaluating the association between DENV infection and MACEs is still lacking. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All laboratory confirmed dengue cases in Taiwan during 2009 and 2015 were included by CDC notifiable database. The self-controlled case-series design was used to evaluate the association between DENV infection and MACE (including acute myocardial infarction [AMI], heart failure and stroke). The "risk interval" was defined as the first 7 days after the diagnosis of DENV infection and the "control interval" as 1 year before and 1 year after the risk interval. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for MACE were estimated by conditional Poisson regression. Finally, the primary outcome of the incidence of MACEs within one year of dengue was observed in 1,247 patients. The IRR of MACEs was 17.9 (95% CI 15.80-20.37) during the first week after the onset of DENV infection observed from 1,244 eligible patients. IRR were significantly higher for hemorrhagic stroke (10.9, 95% CI 6.80-17.49), ischemic stroke (15.56, 95% CI 12.44-19.47), AMI (13.53, 95% CI 10.13-18.06), and heart failure (27.24, 95% CI 22.67-32.73). No increased IRR was observed after day 14. CONCLUSIONS: The risks for MACEs are significantly higher in the immediate time period after dengue infection. Since dengue infection is potentially preventable by early recognition and vaccination, the dengue-associated MACE should be taken into consideration when making public health management policies.


Subject(s)
Dengue/complications , Heart Failure/complications , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Stroke/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Dengue/epidemiology , Dengue Virus , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology
5.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 11(7): e023935, 2022 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714485

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a rapid implementation of telemedicine into clinical practice. This study examined whether early outpatient follow-up via telemedicine is as effective as in-person visits for reducing 30-day readmissions in patients with heart failure. Methods and Results Using electronic health records from a large health system, we included patients with heart failure living in North Carolina (N=6918) who were hospitalized between March 16, 2020 and March 14, 2021. All-cause readmission within 30 days after discharge was examined using weighted logistic regression models. Overall, 7.6% (N=526) of patients received early telemedicine follow-up, 38.8% (N=2681) received early in-person follow-up, and 53.6% (N=3711) did not receive follow-up within 14 days of discharge. Compared with patients without early follow-up, those who received early follow-up were younger, were more likely to be Medicare beneficiaries, had more comorbidities, and were less likely to live in an disadvantaged neighborhood. Relative to in-person visits, those with telemedicine follow-up were of similar age, sex, and race but with generally fewer comorbidities. Overall, the 30-day readmission rate (19.0%) varied among patients who received telemedicine visits (15.0%), in-person visits (14.0%), or no follow-up (23.1%). After covariate adjustment, patients who received either telemedicine (odds ratio [OR], 0.55; 95% CI, 0.44-0.72) or in-person (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.45-0.60) visits were similarly less likely to be readmitted within 30 days compared with patients with no follow-up. Conclusions During the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of telemedicine visits for early follow-up increased rapidly. Patients with heart failure who received outpatient follow-up either via telemedicine or in-person had better outcomes than those who received no follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics , Patient Readmission , United States
6.
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother ; 8(2): 149-156, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706743

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) increases the risk of developing heart failure (HF). The effect of spironolactone on BP of patients at risk of developing HF is yet to be determined. To evaluate the effect of spironolactone on the BP of patients at risk for HF and whether renin can predict spironolactone's effect. METHODS AND RESULTS: HOMAGE (Heart OMics in Aging) was a prospective multicentre randomized open-label blinded endpoint (PROBE) trial including 527 patients at risk for developing HF randomly assigned to either spironolactone (25-50 mg/day) or usual care alone for a maximum of 9 months. Sitting BP was assessed at baseline, Months 1 and 9 (or last visit). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), mixed effects models, and structural modelling equations was used. The median (percentile25-75) age was 73 (69-79) years, 26% were female, and >75% had history of hypertension. Overall, the baseline BP was 142/78 mmHg. Patients with higher BP were older, more likely to have diabetes and less likely to have coronary artery disease, had greater left ventricular mass (LVM), and left atrial volume (LAV). Compared with usual care, by last visit, spironolactone changed SBP by -10.3 (-13.0 to -7.5) mmHg and DBP by -3.2 (-4.8 to -1.7) mmHg (P < 0.001 for both). A higher proportion of patients on spironolactone had controlled BP <130/80 mmHg (36 vs. 26%; P = 0.014). Lower baseline renin levels predicted a greater response to spironolactone (interactionP = 0.041). CONCLUSION: Spironolactone had a clinically important BP-lowering effect. Spironolactone should be considered for lowering blood pressure in patients who are at risk of developing HF.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Spironolactone , Aged , Blood Pressure , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Spironolactone/therapeutic use
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2670, 2022 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704157

ABSTRACT

The prognosis of heart failure (HF) patients is determined to a decisive extent by comorbidities. The present study investigates the association between a broad spectrum of diseases and the occurrence of HF in a large collective of outpatients. This retrospective case control study assessed the prevalence of 37 cardiac and extracardiac diseases in patients with an initial diagnosis of heart failure (ICD-10: I50) in 1,274 general practices in Germany between January 2005 and December 2019. The study is based on the Disease Analyzer database (IQVIA), which contains drug prescriptions, diagnoses, and basic medical and demographic data. Patients with and without heart failure were matched by sex, age, and index year. Hazard regression models were conducted to evaluate the association between different disease entities and heart failure. The present study included 162,246 patients with heart failure and 162,246 patients without heart failure. Mean age [SD] was 73.7 [12.1] years; 52.6% were women. Out of 37 predefined diagnoses, 36 were more prevalent in HF patients. The highest prevalence was primary hypertension (63.4% in HF patients vs. 53.3% in controls, p < 0.001) followed by lipid metabolism disorders (34.6% in HF patients vs. 29.1% in HF patients p < 0.001) and diabetes mellitus type II (32.2% in HF patients vs. 25.2% in controls, p < 0.001). In the regression analysis, 19 diseases were significantly associated with heart failure. Non-cardiovascular diagnoses strongly associated with HF were obesity (HR = 1.46), chronic bronchitis and COPD (HR = 1.41), gout (HR: 1.41), and chronic kidney disease (HR = 1.27). In the present study, we identified a variety of cardiac and extracardiac diseases associated with heart failure. Our data underscore the immense importance of comorbidities, even as early as at the stage of initial diagnosis of heart failure.


Subject(s)
Comorbidity , Heart Failure , Models, Cardiovascular , Registries , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Germany , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
8.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 63, 2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular and renal diseases (CVRD) are major causes of mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Studies of lifetime risk have neither considered all CVRD together nor the relative contribution of major risk factors to combined disease burden. METHODS: In a population-based cohort study using national electronic health records, we studied 473,399 individuals with T2D in England 2007-2018. Lifetime risk of individual and combined major adverse renal cardiovascular events, MARCE (including CV death and CVRD: heart failure; chronic kidney disease; myocardial infarction; stroke or peripheral artery disease), were estimated, accounting for baseline CVRD status and competing risk of death. We calculated population attributable risk for individual CVRD components. Ideal cardiovascular health was defined by blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, smoking, physical activity, diet, and body mass index (i.e. modifiable risk factors). RESULTS: In individuals with T2D, lifetime risk of MARCE was 80% in those free from CVRD and was 97%, 93%, 98%, 89% and 91% in individuals with heart failure, chronic kidney disease, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral arterial disease, respectively at baseline. Among CVRD-free individuals, lifetime risk of chronic kidney disease was highest (54%), followed by CV death (41%), heart failure (29%), stroke (20%), myocardial infarction (19%) and peripheral arterial disease (9%). In those with HF only, 75% of MARCE after index T2D can be attributed to HF after adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidities. Compared with those with > 1, < 3 and ≥3 modifiable health risk behaviours, achieving ideal cardiovascular health could reduce MARCE by approximately 41.5%, 23.6% and 17.2%, respectively, in the T2D population. CONCLUSIONS: Four out of five individuals with T2D free from CVRD, and nearly all those with history of CVRD, will develop MARCE over their lifetime. Early preventive measures in T2D patients are clinical, public health and policy priorities.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Heart Failure , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Risk Factors
9.
Nat Med ; 28(3): 583-590, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671606

ABSTRACT

The cardiovascular complications of acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are well described, but the post-acute cardiovascular manifestations of COVID-19 have not yet been comprehensively characterized. Here we used national healthcare databases from the US Department of Veterans Affairs to build a cohort of 153,760 individuals with COVID-19, as well as two sets of control cohorts with 5,637,647 (contemporary controls) and 5,859,411 (historical controls) individuals, to estimate risks and 1-year burdens of a set of pre-specified incident cardiovascular outcomes. We show that, beyond the first 30 d after infection, individuals with COVID-19 are at increased risk of incident cardiovascular disease spanning several categories, including cerebrovascular disorders, dysrhythmias, ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease, pericarditis, myocarditis, heart failure and thromboembolic disease. These risks and burdens were evident even among individuals who were not hospitalized during the acute phase of the infection and increased in a graded fashion according to the care setting during the acute phase (non-hospitalized, hospitalized and admitted to intensive care). Our results provide evidence that the risk and 1-year burden of cardiovascular disease in survivors of acute COVID-19 are substantial. Care pathways of those surviving the acute episode of COVID-19 should include attention to cardiovascular health and disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Myocarditis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans
10.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(2): 180-188, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664403

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on diet and nutrition among older adults with chronic medical conditions have not been well-described. METHODS: We conducted a survey addressing (1) food access, (2) diet quality and composition, (3) nutritional understanding, and (4) attitudes towards research among adults with heart failure (HF) within an integrated health system. Adults (≥18 years) with diagnosed HF and at least one prior hospitalization for HF within the last 12 months were approached to complete the survey electronically or by mail. Outcomes included all-cause and HF-specific hospitalizations and all-cause death was ascertained via the electronic health record. RESULTS: Among 1212 survey respondents (32.5% of eligible patients) between May 18, 2020 and September 30, 2020, mean ± SD age was 77.9 ± 11.4 years, 50.1% were women, and median (25th-75th) left ventricular ejection fraction was 55% (40%-60%). Overall, 15.1% of respondents were food insecure, and only 65% of participants answered correctly more than half of the items assessing nutritional knowledge. Although most respondents were willing to participate in future research, that number largely declined for studies requiring blood draws (32.2%), study medication (14.4%), and/or behavior change (27.1%). Food security, diet quality, and nutritional knowledge were not independently associated with outcomes at 90 or 180 days. CONCLUSION: In a cohort of older adults with HF and multiple comorbidities, a significant proportion reported issues with food access, diet quality, and nutritional knowledge during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future research should evaluate interventions targeting these domains in at-risk individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude , Diet , Female , Food Security , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Nutritive Value , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left
12.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(1)2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625525

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease with multi-organ involvement, including the cardiovascular system. The disease may cause several cardiovascular complications, and may increase morbidity and mortality among patients with background cardiovascular disease. Patients with advanced heart failure are often treated with left ventricular assist device (LVAD), and represent a unique population mandating multi-disciplinary approach. Several aspects of COVID-19 should be taken into account in LVAD implants, including right ventricular involvement, hemodynamic alterations, thromboembolic and haemorrhagic complications, and the psychological effects of social isolation. Patients with VAD and suspected COVID-19 should be transferred to specialized centers for better management of complications. Here, we review the implications of COVID-19 pandemic on LVAD patients with our recommendations for appropriate management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Heart-Assist Devices , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Heart Lung ; 52: 152-158, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1620699

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus (COVID-19) had a profound impact on the delivery of care in both hospital and outpatient settings across the United States. Patients with heart failure (HF) and healthcare providers had to abruptly adapt. OBJECTIVE: To describe how the COVID-19 pandemic affected practice patterns of HF nurses. METHODS: Practicing HF nurses completed a cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey of perceptions of HF practice. Analyses involved descriptive and comparative statistics. RESULTS: Of 171 nurses who completed surveys, outpatient HF visits decreased and 63.2% added telehealth visits. Despite spending about 29 min educating patients during visits, 27.5% of nurses perceived that the pandemic decreased patients' abilities to provide optimal self-care. Nurses reported decreased ability to collect objective data (62.4%; n = 78), although subjective assessment stayed the same (41.6%; n = 52). CONCLUSION: Nurses' practice patterns provided insight into patient care changes made during COVID-19. Most core components of HF management were retained, but methods of delivery during the pandemic differed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Care , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
14.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 45(4): 471-480, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612918

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Restricted outdoor activity during COVID-19 related lockdown may accelerate heart failure (HF) progression and thereby increase cardiac arrhythmias. We analyzed the impact of March/April 2020 lockdown on physical activity and arrhythmia burden in HF patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices with daily, automatic remote monitoring (RM) function. METHODS: The study cohort included 405 HF patients enrolled in Observation of Clinical Routine Care for Heart Failure Patients Implanted with BIOTRONIK CRT Devices (BIO|STREAM.HF) registry in 16 countries, who had left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% (mean 28.2 ± 6.6%) and NYHA class II/III/IV (47.9%/49.6%/2.5%) before CRT pacemaker/defibrillator implantation. The analyzed RM data comprised physical activity detected by accelerometer, mean heart rate and nocturnal rate, PP variability, percentage of biventricular pacing, atrial high rate episode (AHRE) burden, ventricular extrasystoles and tachyarrhythmias, defibrillator shocks, and number of implant interrogations (i.e., follow-ups). Intraindividual differences in RM parameters before (4-week period) versus during (4-week period) lockdown were tested for statistical significance and independent predictors were identified. RESULTS: There was a significant relative change in activity (mean -6.5%, p < .001), AHRE burden (+17%, p = .013), and follow-up rate (-75%, p < .001) during lockdown, with no significant changes in other RM parameters. Activity decreased by ≥8 min/day in 46.5% of patients; predictors were higher LVEF, lower NYHA class, no defibrillator indication, and more activity before lockdown. AHRE burden increased by ≥17 min/day in 4.7% of patients; predictors were history of atrial fibrillation, higher LVEF, higher body mass index, and activity decrease during lockdown. CONCLUSION: Unfavorable changes in physical activity, AHRE burden, and follow-up rate were observed during lockdown, but not in ventricular arrhythmia.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , COVID-19 , Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy , Defibrillators, Implantable , Heart Failure , Atrial Fibrillation/therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Stroke Volume , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Function, Left
15.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(6): 4370-4393, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1589128

ABSTRACT

Major changes have occurred in these last years in heart failure (HF) management. Landmark trials and the 2021 European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of HF have established four classes of drugs for treatment of HF with reduced ejection fraction: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or an angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor, beta-blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors, namely, dapagliflozin or empagliflozin. These drugs consistently showed benefits on mortality, HF hospitalizations, and quality of life. Correction of iron deficiency is indicated to improve symptoms and reduce HF hospitalizations. AFFIRM-AHF showed 26% reduction in total HF hospitalizations with ferric carboxymaltose vs. placebo in patients hospitalized for acute HF (P = 0.013). The guanylate cyclase activator vericiguat and the myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil improved outcomes in randomized placebo-controlled trials, and vericiguat is now approved for clinical practice. Treatment of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) was a major unmet clinical need until this year when the results of EMPEROR-Preserved (EMPagliflozin outcomE tRial in Patients With chrOnic HFpEF) were issued. Compared with placebo, empagliflozin reduced by 21% (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.69 to 0.90; P < 0.001), the primary outcome of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization. Advances in the treatment of specific phenotypes of HF, including atrial fibrillation, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathies, cardiac amyloidosis, and cancer-related HF, also occurred. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic still plays a major role in HF epidemiology and management. All these aspects are highlighted in this review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume
16.
Int J Cardiol ; 350: 125-129, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587660

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, admissions for cardiovascular disease, including Heart Failure (HF), were reduced. Patients hospitalised for HF were sicker and with increased in-hospital mortality. So far, whether following waves had a different impact on HF patients is unknown. METHODS: All consecutive patients hospitalised for acute heart failure during three different COVID-19 related national lockdowns were analysed. The lockdown periods were defined according to Government guidelines as 23/3/2020 to 4/7/2020 (First Lockdown), 4/11/2020 to 2/12/2020 (Second Lockdown) and 5/1/2021 to 28/2/2021 (Third Lockdown). RESULTS: Overall, 184 patients hospitalised for HF were included in the study, 95 during the 1st lockdown, 30 during the 2nd lockdown and 59 during the 3rd lockdown. Across the three groups had comparable clinical characteristics, comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. Specialist in-hospital care was uninterrupted during the pandemic showing comparable mortality rates (p = 0.10). Although medical therapy for HF was comparable between the three lockdowns, a significantly higher proportion of patients received Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitors (ARNI) in the second and third lockdowns (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Although public health approaches changed throughout the pandemic, the clinical characteristics and outcomes of HF patients were consistent across different waves. For patients hospitalised in the subsequent waves, a more rapid optimization of medical therapy was observed during hospitalization. Particular attention should be devoted to prevent collateral cardiovascular damage during public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Communicable Disease Control , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 23(3): 421-427, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587368

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate 6-month risk stratification capacity of the newly developed TeleHFCovid19-Score for remote management of older patients with heart failure (HF) during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. DESIGN: Monocentric observational prospective study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Older HF outpatients remotely managed during the first pandemic wave. METHODS: The TeleHFCovid19-Score (0-29) was obtained by an ad hoc developed multiparametric standardized questionnaire administered during telephone visits to older HF patients (and/or caregivers) followed at our HF clinic. Questions were weighed on the basis of clinical judgment and review of current HF literature. According to the score, patients were divided in progressively increasing risk groups: green (0-3), yellow (4-8), and red (≥9). RESULTS: A total of 146 patients composed our study population: at baseline, 112, 21, and 13 were classified as green, yellow, and red, respectively. Mean age was 81±9 years, and women were 40%. Compared to patients of red and yellow groups, those in the green group had a lower use of high-dose loop diuretics (P < .001) or thiazide-like diuretics (P = .027) and had reported less frequently dyspnea at rest or for basic activities, new or worsening extremity edema, or weight increase (all P < .001). At 6 months, compared with red (62.2%) and yellow patients (33.3%), green patients (8.9%) presented a significantly lower rate of the composite outcome of cardiovascular death and/or HF hospitalization (P < .001). Moreover, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed a high sensibility and specificity of our score at 6 months (area under the curve = 0.789, 95% CI 0.682-0.896, P < .001) with a score <4.5 (very close to green group cutoff) that identified lower-risk subjects. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: The TeleHFCovid19-Score was able to correctly identify patients with midterm favorable outcome. Therefore, our questionnaire might be used to identify low-risk chronic HF patients who could be temporarily managed remotely, allowing to devote more efforts to the care of higher-risk patients who need closer and on-site clinical evaluations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Telemedicine , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Semin Arthritis Rheum ; 52: 151946, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Factors associated with chronic heart failure (CHF) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have received little attention. Recent data on the use of hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection have cast doubt on its cardiac safety. The factors associated with CHF, including therapy with antimalarials, were analyzed in a large multicenter SLE cohort. METHODS: Cross-sectional study including all patients with SLE (ACR-1997 criteria) included in the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Register (RELESSER), based on historically gathered data. Patients with CHF prior to diagnosis of SLE were excluded. A multivariable analysis exploring factors associated with CHF was conducted. RESULTS: The study population comprised 117 patients with SLE (ACR-97 criteria) and CHF and 3,506 SLE controls. Ninety percent were women. Patients with CHF were older and presented greater SLE severity, organ damage, and mortality than those without CHF. The multivariable model revealed the factors associated with CHF to be ischemic heart disease (7.96 [4.01-15.48], p < 0.0001), cardiac arrhythmia (7.38 [4.00-13.42], p < 0.0001), pulmonary hypertension (3.71 [1.84-7.25], p < 0.0002), valvulopathy (6.33 [3.41-11.62], p < 0.0001), non-cardiovascular damage (1.29 [1.16-1.44], p < 0.000) and calcium/vitamin D treatment (5.29 [2.07-16.86], p = 0.0015). Female sex (0.46 [0.25-0.88], p = 0.0147) and antimalarials (0.28 [0.17-0.45], p < 0.000) proved to be protective factors. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SLE and CHF experience more severe SLE. Treatment with antimalarials appears to confer a cardioprotective effect.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials , COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Rheumatology , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/complications , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
19.
ESC Heart Fail ; 9(1): 31-38, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575095

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had unprecedented effects on health care utilization for acute cardiovascular diseases. Although hospitalizations for acute coronary syndrome decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a paucity of data on the trends and management of heart failure (HF) cases. Furthermore, concerns have been raised that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) may increase susceptibility to COVID-19. This study aimed to elucidate changes in HF hospitalizations from the COVID-19 state of emergency in Japan and investigated changes in the prescription of ACEIs and ARBs, and in-hospital mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed an interrupted time series analysis of HF hospitalizations in Japan to verify the impacts of the COVID-19 state of emergency. Changes in the weekly volume of HF hospitalizations were taken as the primary outcome measure. Between 1 April 2018 and 4 July 2020, 109 429 HF cases required admission. After the state of emergency, an immediate decrease was observed in HF cases per week [-3.6%; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.3% to -6.7%, P = 0.03]. There was no significant change in the prescription of ACEIs or ARBs after the state of emergency (4.2%; 95% CI: -0.3% to 8.9%, P = 0.07). The COVID-19 pandemic had no effect on in-hospital mortality among HF patients (5.3%; 95% CI: -4.9% to 16.6%, P = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated a decline in HF hospitalizations during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan, with no clear evidence of a negative effect on the prescription of ACEIs and ARBs or in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Respir Med ; 191: 106714, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559656

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have poor outcomes in the setting of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The primary objective is to compare outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 CAP and non-SARS-CoV-2 CAP in patients with COPD. The secondary objective is to compare outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 CAP with and without COPD. METHODS: In this analysis of two observational studies, three cohorts were analyzed: (1) patients with COPD and SARS-CoV-2 CAP; (2) patients with COPD and non-SARS-CoV-2 CAP; and (3) patients with SARS-CoV-2 CAP without COPD. Outcomes included length of stay, ICU admission, cardiac events, and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: Ninety-six patients with COPD and SARS-CoV-2 CAP were compared to 1129 patients with COPD and non-SARS-CoV-2 CAP. 536 patients without COPD and SARS-CoV-2 CAP were analyzed for the secondary objective. Patients with COPD and SARS-CoV-2 CAP had longer hospital stay (15 vs 5 days, p < 0.001), 4.98 higher odds of cardiac events (95% CI: 3.74-6.69), and 7.31 higher odds of death (95% CI: 5.36-10.12) in comparison to patients with COPD and non-SARS-CoV-2 CAP. In patients with SARS-CoV-2 CAP, presence of COPD was associated with 1.74 (95% CI: 1.39-2.19) higher odds of ICU admission and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.05-2.05) higher odds of death. CONCLUSION: In patients with COPD and CAP, presence of SARS-CoV-2 as an etiologic agent is associated with more cardiovascular events, longer hospital stay, and seven-fold increase in mortality. In patients with SARS-CoV-2 CAP, presence of COPD is associated with 1.5-fold increase in mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/physiopathology , Hospital Mortality , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia/physiopathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Community-Acquired Infections/therapy , Comorbidity , Edema, Cardiac/epidemiology , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Pneumonia/therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , Pulmonary Edema/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology
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