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1.
Eur Heart J ; 43(23): 2237-2246, 2022 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2188653

ABSTRACT

Heart transplantation is advocated in selected patients with advanced heart failure in the absence of contraindications. Principal challenges in heart transplantation centre around an insufficient and underutilized donor organ pool, the need to individualize titration of immunosuppressive therapy, and to minimize late complications such as cardiac allograft vasculopathy, malignancy, and renal dysfunction. Advances have served to increase the organ donor pool by advocating the use of donors with underlying hepatitis C virus infection and by expanding the donor source to use hearts donated after circulatory death. New techniques to preserve the donor heart over prolonged ischaemic times, and enabling longer transport times in a safe manner, have been introduced. Mechanical circulatory support as a bridge to transplantation has allowed patients with advanced heart failure to avoid progressive deterioration in hepato-renal function while awaiting an optimal donor organ match. The management of the heart transplantation recipient remains a challenge despite advances in immunosuppression, which provide early gains in rejection avoidance but are associated with infections and late-outcome challenges. In this article, we review contemporary advances and challenges in this field to focus on donor recovery strategies, left ventricular assist devices, and immunosuppressive monitoring therapies with the potential to enhance outcomes. We also describe opportunities for future discovery to include a renewed focus on long-term survival, which continues to be an area that is under-studied and poorly characterized, non-human sources of organs for transplantation including xenotransplantation as well as chimeric transplantation, and technology competitive to human heart transplantation, such as tissue engineering.


Subject(s)
Heart Diseases , Heart Failure , Heart Transplantation , Heart-Assist Devices , Heart Failure/therapy , Heart Transplantation/methods , Humans , Tissue Donors
2.
Heart ; 108(4): 258-265, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2137872

ABSTRACT

Ramadan fasting is observed by most of the 1.8 billion Muslims around the world. It lasts for 1 month per the lunar calendar year and is the abstention from any food and drink from dawn to sunset. While recommendations on 'safe' fasting exist for patients with some chronic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, guidance for patients with cardiovascular disease is lacking. We reviewed the literature to help healthcare professionals educate, discuss and manage patients with cardiovascular conditions, who are considering fasting. Studies on the safety of Ramadan fasting in patients with cardiac disease are sparse, observational, of small sample size and have short follow-up. Using expert consensus and a recognised framework, we risk stratified patients into 'low or moderate risk', for example, stable angina or non-severe heart failure; 'high risk', for example, poorly controlled arrhythmias or recent myocardial infarction; and 'very high risk', for example, advanced heart failure. The 'low-moderate risk' group may fast, provided their medications and clinical conditions allow. The 'high' or 'very high risk' groups should not fast and may consider safe alternatives such as non-consecutive fasts or fasting shorter days, for example, during winter. All patients who are fasting should be educated before Ramadan on their risk and management (including the risk of dehydration, fluid overload and terminating the fast if they become unwell) and reviewed after Ramadan to reassess their risk status and condition. Further studies to clarify the benefits and risks of fasting on the cardiovascular system in patients with different cardiovascular conditions should help refine these recommendations.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Fasting/adverse effects , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Islam
3.
J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 36(6): 609-617, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Difficulties in coping with and self-managing heart failure (HF) are well known. The COVID-19 pandemic may further complicate self-care practices associated with HF. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to understand COVID-19's impact on HF self-care, as well as related coping adaptations that may blunt the impact of COVID-19 on HF health outcomes. METHODS: A qualitative study using phone interviews, guided by the framework of vulnerability analysis for sustainability, was used to explore HF self-care among older adults in central Texas during the late spring of 2020. Qualitative data were analyzed using directed content analysis. RESULTS: Seventeen older adults with HF participated (mean [SD] age, 68 [9.1] years; 62% female, 68% White, 40% below poverty line, 35% from rural areas). Overall, the COVID-19 pandemic had an adverse impact on the HF self-care behavior of physical activity. Themes of social isolation, financial concerns, and disruptions in access to medications and food indicated exposure, and rural residence and source of income increased sensitivity, whereas adaptations by healthcare system, health-promoting activities, socializing via technology, and spiritual connections increased resilience to the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The study's findings have implications for identifying vulnerabilities in sustaining HF self-care by older adults and empowering older adults with coping strategies to improve overall satisfaction with care and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Aged , Female , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Care
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116143

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to compare well-being and physical activity (PA) before and during COVID-19 confinement in older adults with heart failure (HF), to compare well-being and PA during COVID-19 confinement in octogenarians and non-octogenarians, and to explore well-being, social support, attention to symptoms, and assistance needs during confinement in this population. METHODS: A mixed-methods design was performed. Well-being (Cantril Ladder of Life) and PA (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) were assessed. Semi-structured interviews were performed to assess the rest of the variables. RESULTS: 120 participants were evaluated (74.16 ± 12.90 years; octogenarians = 44.16%, non-octogenarians = 55.83%). Both groups showed lower well-being and performed less PA during confinement than before (p < 0.001). Octogenarians reported lower well-being (p = 0.02), higher sedentary time (p = 0.03), and lower levels of moderate PA (p = 0.04) during confinement. Most individuals in the sample considered their well-being to have decreased during confinement, 30% reported decreased social support, 50% increased their attention to symptoms, and 60% were not satisfied with the assistance received. Octogenarians were more severely impacted during confinement than non-octogenarians in terms of well-being, attention to symptoms, and assistance needs. CONCLUSIONS: Well-being and PA decreased during confinement, although octogenarians were more affected than non-octogenarians. Remote monitoring strategies are needed in elders with HF to control health outcomes in critical periods, especially in octogenarians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Humans , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Social Support , Heart Failure/therapy , Exercise , Sedentary Behavior
5.
Open Heart ; 9(2)2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108308

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The diagnostic and therapeutic arsenal for heart failure with preserved ejection (HFpEF) has expanded. With novel therapies (eg, sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors) and firmer recommendations to optimise non-cardiac comorbidities, it is unclear if outpatient HFpEF models can adequately deliver this. We; therefore, evaluated the efficacy of an existing dedicated HFpEF clinic to find innovative ways to design a more comprehensive model tailored to the modern era of HFpEF. METHODS: A single-centre retrospective analysis of 202 HFpEF outpatients was performed over 12 months before the COVID-19 pandemic. Baseline characteristics, clinic activities (eg, medication changes, lifestyle modifications, management of comorbidities) and follow-up arrangements were compared between a HFpEF and general cardiology clinic to assess their impact on mortality and morbidity at 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: Between the two clinic groups, the sample population was evenly matched with a typical HFpEF profile (mean age 79±9.6 years, 55% female and a high prevalence of cardiometabolic comorbidities). While follow-up practices were similar, the HFpEF clinic delivered significantly more interventions on lifestyle changes, blood pressure and heart rate control (p<0.0001) compared with the general clinic. Despite this, no significant differences in all-cause hospitalisation and mortality were observed. This may be attributed to the fact that clinic activities were primarily cardiology-focused. Importantly, non-cardiovascular admissions accounted for >60% of hospitalisation, including causes of recurrent admissions. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that existing general and emerging dedicated HFpEF clinics may not be adequate in addressing the multifaceted aspects of HFpEF as clinic activities concentrated primarily on cardiological measures. Although the small cohort and short follow-up period are important limitations, this study reminds clinicians that HFpEF patients are more at risk of non-cardiac than HF-related events. We have therefore proposed a pragmatic framework that can comprehensively deliver the modern guideline-directed recommendations and management of non-cardiac comorbidities through a multidisciplinary approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Humans , Female , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Male , Stroke Volume/physiology , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , State Medicine , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , COVID-19/therapy , Ambulatory Care Facilities
6.
7.
J Gerontol Nurs ; 48(10): 47-52, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055512

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has negatively affected the health and well-being of family care partners of older adults with heart failure (HF-FCPs). The purpose of the current study was to examine the caregiving experiences and coping strategies of older HF-FCPs during the ongoing pandemic. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 13 HF-FCPs (aged ≥65 years) from January to April 2021. Three themes emerged: (1) Impact on Physical, Mental, and Social Health; (2) Limitations of Using Health Care Services; and (3) Coping Strategies. During the pandemic, HF-FCPs had increased caregiving burden due to managing their own age-related health and providing care to their family member with heart failure. After 1 year of COVID-19, they adjusted by increasing use of telecommunication platforms and following prevention and protection strategies. During the ongoing pandemic, emotional and social support, respite care, and digital health support for older HF-FCPs would be beneficial for improving their physical, mental, and social health. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 48(10), 47-52.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Aged , Caregivers/psychology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
8.
Expert Rev Cardiovasc Ther ; 20(10): 807-828, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051004

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 may contribute to decompensation of previously stable chronic HF or cause a de-novo heart failure, which may come from the hyperinflammatory response and subsequent increase in metabolic demand. AREAS COVERED: Two independent investigators searched MEDLINE (via PubMed), Europe PMC, and ScienceDirect databases with the following search terms: COVID-19, heart failure, COVID-19 drugs, heart failure drugs, and device therapy. All of the included full-text articles were rigorously evaluated by both authors in case there was disagreement about whether research should be included or not. In total, 157 studies were included and underwent extensive reading by the authors. EXPERT OPINION: The World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Institute of Health (NIH) have published COVID-19 drug recommendations, although recommendations for HF-specific drug choices in COVID-19 are still lacking. We hope that this review can answer the void of comprehensive research data regarding the management options of HF in the COVID-19 condition so that clinicians can at least choose a more beneficial therapy or avoid combination therapies that have a high burden of side effects on HF; thus, morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 patients with HF may be reduced.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Heart Failure/therapy , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Europe
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(9): e40108, 2022 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022425

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The demand for health services to meet the chronic health needs of the aging population is significant and remains unmet because of the limited supply of clinical resources. Specifically, in managing heart failure (HF), digital health sought to address this gap during the COVID-19 pandemic but highlighted an access issue for those who could not use technology-mediated health care services without the support of their informal caregivers (ICs). The complexity of managing HF symptoms and recurrent exacerbations requires many patients to comanage their illness with their ICs in a care dyad, working together to optimize patient outcomes and health-related quality of life. However, most HF programs have missed the opportunity to consider the dyadic perspective despite interdependencies on HF outcomes. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to characterize the value of technology in supporting caregiving for individuals living with HF. METHODS: Motivated by an observed unique pattern of engagement in patients enrolled in our Medly HF management program at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre in Toronto, Canada, we conducted 20 semistructured interviews with a convenience sample of ICs. All interviews were analyzed using the iterative refinement of a codeveloped codebook. The team maintained reflexivity journals to reflect the impact of their positionality on their coding. Themes were first derived deductively using HF typologies (patient-oriented dyads, caregiver-oriented dyads, and collaboratively oriented dyads) and then inductively refined and recategorized based on concepts from the van Houtven et al framework. RESULTS: We believe that there is a need to formally and intentionally expand HF technologies to include dyadic needs and goals. We suggest defining 3 opportunities in which value can be added to technological design. First, identify how technology may be leveraged to increase psychological bandwidth by reducing uncertainty and providing peace of mind. We found that actionable feedback was highly desired by both partners. Second, develop technology that can serve as a member of the dyad's support system. In our experience, automated prompts for patients to take measurements can mimic the support typically provided by ICs and ease their workload. Third, consider how technology can mitigate the dyad's clinical knowledge requirements and learning curve. Our approach includes real-time actionable feedback paired with a human-in-the-loop, nurse-led model of care. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings identified a need to focus on improving the dyadic experience as a whole by building IC functionality into digital health self-management interventions. Through a shared model of care that supports the role of the patient in their own HF management, includes ICs to expand and enhance the patient's capacity to care, and acknowledges the need of ICs to care for themselves, we anticipate improved outcomes for both partners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Aged , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Self Care , Technology
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(8): e38082, 2022 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022390

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a common disease and a major public health problem. HF mortality prediction is critical for developing individualized prevention and treatment plans. However, due to their lack of interpretability, most HF mortality prediction models have not yet reached clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to develop an interpretable model to predict the mortality risk for patients with HF in intensive care units (ICUs) and used the SHapley Additive exPlanation (SHAP) method to explain the extreme gradient boosting (XGBoost) model and explore prognostic factors for HF. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we achieved model development and performance comparison on the eICU Collaborative Research Database (eICU-CRD). We extracted data during the first 24 hours of each ICU admission, and the data set was randomly divided, with 70% used for model training and 30% used for model validation. The prediction performance of the XGBoost model was compared with three other machine learning models by the area under the curve. We used the SHAP method to explain the XGBoost model. RESULTS: A total of 2798 eligible patients with HF were included in the final cohort for this study. The observed in-hospital mortality of patients with HF was 9.97%. Comparatively, the XGBoost model had the highest predictive performance among four models with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.824 (95% CI 0.7766-0.8708), whereas support vector machine had the poorest generalization ability (AUC=0.701, 95% CI 0.6433-0.7582). The decision curve showed that the net benefit of the XGBoost model surpassed those of other machine learning models at 10%~28% threshold probabilities. The SHAP method reveals the top 20 predictors of HF according to the importance ranking, and the average of the blood urea nitrogen was recognized as the most important predictor variable. CONCLUSIONS: The interpretable predictive model helps physicians more accurately predict the mortality risk in ICU patients with HF, and therefore, provides better treatment plans and optimal resource allocation for their patients. In addition, the interpretable framework can increase the transparency of the model and facilitate understanding the reliability of the predictive model for the physicians.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Machine Learning , Cohort Studies , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies
11.
BMJ Open ; 12(8): e056962, 2022 08 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Remote monitoring as a component of chronic heart failure (CHF) management programmes has demonstrated utility in reducing the risk of rehospitalisation and mortality. There is little evidence on mobile health app facilitated remote monitoring in India. We conducted a pilot usability and feasibility assessment of a smartphone-based application (Suhriday) to remotely monitor patients with CHF. METHODS: We used a mixed-methods design. Usability testing consisted of the think-aloud approach followed by semistructured in-depth interviews (SSIs) and a satisfaction questionnaire. Feasibility testing was done using acceptability and user satisfaction questionnaires in addition to SSIs. We trained five purposively sampled patients with CHF (based on health literacy and gender) and their caregivers (n=10) in self-care monitoring and app use. Usability was assessed using metrics such as task completion, time required for task completion and user satisfaction using Brooke's System Usability Scale (SUS). Content analysis of the transcripts with deductive coding was performed for both usability and feasibility interviews. The number and types of medical alerts transmitted through the app were captured and escalated to the treating team. RESULTS: Critical tasks involving (1) opening the app and identifying task list, (2) reporting blood pressure, weight, heart rate and fluid intake and (3) reporting symptoms were completed within 60 s by four patients. Median (IQR) SUS score was 85 (75-92.5) indicating high level of usability. There were 62 alerts from four patients over 4 weeks, with 36 (58.1%) excess fluid intake alerts and 16 (25.8%) blood pressure variations being the most frequent. One participant had challenges using the app and was monitored through active phone calls. CONCLUSION: Overall usability and satisfaction with Suhriday were good and we were able to remotely manage patients. However, patients with limited health literacy and those facing technological challenges required active structured telephone support.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Feasibility Studies , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Self Care , Smartphone
12.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(4): 300-306, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2018337

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heart failure readmissions are common, though some are preventable through evidence-based management. LOCAL PROBLEM: Despite outperforming national benchmarks for 30-day readmissions, compliance with an evidence-based institutional heart failure management pathway was inconsistent. The purpose of this project was to reduce 30-day heart failure readmission rates through an educational intervention and an electronic health record (EHR) redesign. METHODS: The cardiac services nursing leadership team conducted an education and documentation needs assessment to identify knowledge gaps and practical barriers to effective utilization of evidence-based interventions for heart failure management. INTERVENTIONS: This intervention included an Advanced Cardiovascular Education (ACE) Academy and an EHR workflow redesign for clinical and supportive nursing staff. RESULTS: The 30-day heart failure readmission rates reduced immediately following the intervention, and rates continued to decrease over a 3-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Even among hospitals outperforming national benchmarks, 30-day heart failure readmissions can be reduced and sustained with enhanced education and EHR redesign.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Patient Readmission , Electronic Health Records , Heart Failure/therapy , Hospitals , Humans
13.
Value Health ; 25(6): 897-913, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004304

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically review and summarize economic evaluations of noninvasive remote patient monitoring (RPM) for chronic diseases compared with usual care. METHODS: A systematic literature search identified economic evaluations of RPM for chronic diseases, compared with usual care. Searches of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and EconLit using keyword synonyms for RPM and economics identified articles published from up until September 2021. Title, abstract, and full-text reviews were conducted. Data extraction of study characteristics and health economic findings was performed. Article reporting quality was assessed using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. RESULTS: This review demonstrated that the cost-effectiveness of RPM was dependent on clinical context, capital investment, organizational processes, and willingness to pay in each specific setting. RPM was found to be highly cost-effective for hypertension and may be cost-effective for heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There were few studies that investigated RPM for diabetes or other chronic diseases. Studies were of high reporting quality, with an average Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards score of 81%. Of the final 34 included studies, most were conducted from the healthcare system perspective. Eighteen studies used cost-utility analysis, 4 used cost-effectiveness analysis, 2 combined cost-utility analysis and a cost-effectiveness analysis, 1 used cost-consequence analysis, 1 used cost-benefit analysis, and 8 used cost-minimization analysis. CONCLUSIONS: RPM was highly cost-effective for hypertension and may achieve greater long-term cost savings from the prevention of high-cost health events. For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure, cost-effectiveness findings differed according to disease severity and there was limited economic evidence for diabetes interventions.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Hypertension , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Chronic Disease , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy
14.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0269470, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2002295

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Surgical and FFP2 masks are recommended to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV-2. The cardiopulmonary effects of facemasks in patients with chronic heart failure are unknown. This prospective, cross-over study quantified the effects of wearing no mask (nm), surgical mask (sm), and FFP2 mask (ffpm) in patients with stable heart failure. METHODS: 12 patients with clinically stable chronic heart failure (HF) (age 63.8±12 years, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 43.8±11%, NTProBNP 573±567 pg/ml) underwent spiroergometry with and without masks in a randomized sequence. Comfort/discomfort was assessed using a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: Maximum power was reduced with both types of masks (nm: 108.3 W vs. sm: 101.2 W vs. ffpm: 95.6 W, p<0.01). Maximum respiratory oxygen uptake (1499ml/min vs. 1481 ml/min vs. 1300 ml/min, p = 0.95 and <0.01), peak ventilation (62.1 l/min vs. 56.4 l/min vs. 50.3 l/min, p = 0.15 and p<0.05) and O2-pulse (11.6 ml/beat vs. 11.8 ml/beat vs. 10.6 ml/beat, p = 0.87 and p<0.01) were significantly changed with ffpm but not sm. Discomfort was moderately but significantly increased (nm: 1.6 vs. sm: 3.4 vs. ffpm: 4.4, p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Both surgical and FFP masks reduce exercise capacity in heart failure patients, while FFP2 masks reduce oxygen uptake and peak ventilation. This reduction in cardiopulmonary performance should be considered in heart failure patients whose daily life activities are often just as challenging as exercise is for healthy adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Over Studies , Exercise Test , Exercise Tolerance , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Middle Aged , Oxygen , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left
15.
16.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e061405, 2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973844

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Living with heart failure (HF), is a shared journey and arduous work for patients and their informal family caregivers. Given the key role and limited evidence of dyad illness management in improving dyad health in the context of HF, we developed a customisable, relationship focused, family online dynamic disease management programme-FOCUS programme-to improve dyad health for HF patients and their informal caregivers in China. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Based on the Theory of Dyadic Illness Management and the Systemic Transactional Model of Stress and Coping, the family customised online FOCUS programme has five modules: (1) family participatory; (2) open communication; (3) coping effectiveness; (4) uncertainty reduction and 5) shared dyad life stories. HF family dyads will be recruited in the cardiology wards of four university-affiliated hospitals in China. The dyads (N=142) will be randomly allocated to the intervention group that will receive the family customised online FOCUS programme, and the attention control group that will not receive elements of the FOCUS programme. Dyadic coping, HF somatic perception, self-care, anxiety and depression for patients and family caregivers and all-cause mortality and hospital admission for patients will be measured at baseline, 4 weeks (after the discharge, T1), 12 weeks (after the discharge, T2) and 24 weeks (after the discharge, T3). Statistical analysis will be performed using SPSS V. 22.0 software. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study protocol was approved by the ethics committees of Tianjin Medical University (Reference number TMUHEC2019002) that covers all the centres enrolled in this study. The findings of this study will be published in scientific journals and will be presented at scientific conferences. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR2100053168.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Heart Failure , Anxiety/therapy , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Self Care/methods
17.
Curr Cardiol Rev ; 18(4): e130522204750, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968935
18.
J Card Surg ; 37(11): 3947-3950, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968159

ABSTRACT

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is rare, however, severe hyperinflammatory condition in children generally weeks after acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. A subset of MIS-C patients is presented with severe heart failure. We hereby report 8-year-old girl presenting acute severe left ventricular failure. Various medical treatments including inotropic agents and drugs related to SARS-CoV-2 infection and MIS-C were applied. However, venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was needed to be performed. Due to unsuccessful attempts for ECMO weaning, left ventricular assist device was implanted to the patient with temporary right ventricular support from ECMO.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Heart-Assist Devices , COVID-19/complications , Child , Female , Heart Failure/etiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy
19.
J Card Fail ; 28(7): 1230-1234, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966411
20.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 22(1): 270, 2022 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962737

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation for heart failure continues to be greatly underused worldwide despite being a Class I recommendation in international clinical guidelines and uptake is low in women and patients with mental health comorbidities. METHODS: Rehabilitation EnAblement in CHronic Heart Failure (REACH-HF) programme was implemented in four UK National Health Service early adopter sites ('Beacon Sites') between June 2019 and June 2020. Implementation and patient-reported outcome data were collected across sites as part of the National Audit of Cardiac Rehabilitation. The change in key outcomes before and after the supervised period of REACH-HF intervention across the Beacon Sites was assessed and compared to those of the intervention arm of the REACH-HF multicentre trial. RESULTS: Compared to the REACH-HF multicentre trial, patients treated at the Beacon Site were more likely to be female (33.8% vs 22.9%), older (75.6 vs 70.1), had a more severe classification of heart failure (26.5% vs 17.7%), had poorer baseline health-related quality of life (MLHFQ score 36.1 vs 31.4), were more depressed (HADS score 6.4 vs 4.1) and anxious (HADS score 7.2 vs 4.7), and had lower exercise capacity (ISWT distance 190 m vs 274.7 m). There appeared to be a substantial heterogeneity in the implementation process across the four Beacon Sites as evidenced by the variation in levels of patient recruitment, operationalisation of the REACH-HF intervention and patient outcomes. Overall lower improvements in patient-reported outcomes at the Beacon Sites compared to the trial may reflect differences in the population studied (having higher morbidity at baseline) as well as the marked challenges in intervention delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: The results of this study illustrate the challenges in consistently implementing an intervention (shown to be clinically effective and cost-effective in a multicentre trial) into real-world practice, especially in the midst of a global pandemic. Further research is needed to establish the real-world effectiveness of the REACH-HF intervention in different populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Heart Failure , Female , Heart Failure/rehabilitation , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life , State Medicine
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