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1.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 18(1): 158, 2023 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303639

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nearly half of the patients with hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) have cardiovascular involvement, a major cause of mortality. COVID-19 infection can lead to cardiac involvement, negatively impacting the clinical course and prognosis. We reported two patients with HES complicated by COVID-19, with cardiac involvement and valve replacement. CASE PRESENTATION: Our first patient was a 27-year-old woman admitted due to dyspnea and signs of heart failure. She had severe mitral stenosis and mitral regurgitation on the echocardiogram. Corticosteroid therapy improved her symptoms initially, but she deteriorated following a positive COVID-19 test. A repeated echocardiogram showed right ventricular failure, severe mitral regurgitation, and torrential tricuspid regurgitation and, she underwent mitral and tricuspid valve replacement. Our second patient was a 43-year-old man with HES resulted in severe tricuspid stenosis, which was improved with corticosteroid treatment. He underwent tricuspid valve replacement due to severe valvular regurgitation. He was admitted again following tricuspid prosthetic mechanical valve thrombosis. Initial workups revealed lung involvement in favor of COVID-19 infection, and his PCR test was positive. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 infection can change the clinical course of HES. It may result in a heart failure exacerbation due to myocardial injury and an increased risk of thrombosis in prosthetic valves or native vessels due to hypercoagulability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Heart Valve Diseases , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Mitral Valve Insufficiency , Thrombosis , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Mitral Valve Insufficiency/etiology , Mitral Valve Insufficiency/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods , COVID-19/complications , Heart Valve Diseases/surgery , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency/etiology , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency/surgery , Syndrome , Heart Failure/surgery , Thrombosis/etiology , Disease Progression , Heart Valve Prosthesis/adverse effects
2.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 68(7): 882-887, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2281802

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: T-wave positivity in the lead aVR is a marker of ventricular repolarization abnormality and provides information on short- and long-term cardiovascular mortality in heart failure patients, those with anterior myocardial infarction, and patients who underwent hemodialysis for various reasons. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between T-wave positivity in the lead aVR on superficial electrocardiogram and mortality from COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This study retrospectively included 130 patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and treated as an outpatient or in the thoracic diseases ward in a single center between January 2021 and June 2021. All patients included in the study had clinical and radiological features and signs of COVID-19 pneumonia. The COVID-19 diagnosis of all patients was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction detected from an oropharyngeal swab. RESULTS: A total of 130 patients were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: survived and deceased. There were 55 patients (mean age: 64.76-14.93 years, 58.18 male, 41.12% female) in the survived group and 75 patients (mean age: 65-15 years, 58.67 male, 41.33% female) in the deceased group. The univariate and multivariate regression analyses showed that positive transcatheter aortic valve replacement (OR 5.151; 95%CI 1.001-26.504; p=0.0012), lactate dehydrogenase (OR 1.006; 95%CI 1.001-1.010; p=0.012), and d-dimer (OR 1.436; 95%CI 1.115-1.848; p=0.005) were independent risk factors for mortality. CONCLUSION: A positive transcatheter aortic valve replacement is useful in risk stratification for mortality from COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Electrocardiography , Female , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Addict Sci Clin Pract ; 18(1): 9, 2023 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278934

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Injection drug use-related endocarditis is increasingly common among hospitalized patients in the United States, and associated morbidity and mortality are rising. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we present the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe opioid use disorder and multiple episodes of infective endocarditis requiring prosthetic tricuspid valve replacement, who developed worsening dyspnea on exertion. Her echocardiogram demonstrated severe tricuspid regurgitation with a flail prosthetic valve leaflet, without concurrent endocarditis, necessitating a repeat valve replacement. Her care was overseen by our institution's Endocarditis Working Group, a multidisciplinary team that includes providers from addiction medicine, cardiology, infectious disease, cardiothoracic surgery, and neurocritical care. The team worked together to evaluate her, develop a treatment plan for her substance use disorder in tandem with her other medical conditions, and advocate for her candidacy for valve replacement. CONCLUSIONS: Multidisciplinary endocarditis teams such as these are important emerging innovations, which have demonstrated improvements in outcomes for patients with infective endocarditis and substance use disorders, and have the potential to reduce bias by promoting standard-of-care treatment.


Subject(s)
Endocarditis, Bacterial , Endocarditis , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Opioid-Related Disorders , Female , Humans , United States , Adult , Tricuspid Valve/surgery , Endocarditis/surgery , Endocarditis, Bacterial/surgery
4.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 23(1): 187, 2023 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262605

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has caused the deferral of millions of elective procedures, likely resulting in a backlog of cases. We estimate the number of postponed surgical aortic valve replacement (sAVR) and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. METHODS: Using German national records, all isolated TAVR and sAVR procedures between 2007 and 2020 were identified. Using weekly TAVR and sAVR procedures between 2017 and 2019, we created a forecast for 2020 and compared it with the observed number of procedures in 2020. RESULTS: In Germany, a total of 225,398 isolated sAVR and 159,638 isolated TAVR procedures were conducted between 2007 and 2020 that were included in our analysis. The reduction in all AVR procedures (sAVR and TAVR) for the entire year 2020 was 19.07% (95%CI: 15.19-22.95%). During the first wave of the pandemic (week 12-21), the mean weekly reduction was 32.06% (23.44-40.68%) and during the second wave of the pandemic (week 41-52), the mean weekly reduction was 25.58% (14.19-36.97%). The number of sAVR procedures decreased more than the number of TAVR procedures (24.63% vs. 16.42% for the entire year 2020). CONCLUSION: The first year of the COVID-19 pandemic saw a substantial postponing of AVR procedures in Germany. Postponing was higher for sAVR than for TAVR procedures and less pronounced during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Humans , Aortic Valve/diagnostic imaging , Aortic Valve/surgery , Pandemics , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome , Hospital Mortality , COVID-19/epidemiology , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Germany/epidemiology
6.
Adv Clin Exp Med ; 31(9): 1043-1048, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025853

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had an impact on the quality of healthcare services and led to many changes in the treatment of cardiac pathologies. OBJECTIVES: To assess the differences in the clinical manifestations, management and outcomes of patients with aortic valve diseases (AVDs) treated invasively before and during the pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This retrospective single-center study involved patients with AVDs treated by means of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in 2019 and 2020. They were divided into groups with respect to the year of intervention (2019 compared to 2020) and the priority of admission (urgent compared to elective). Preoperative characteristics, early outcomes and probability of annual survival were compared between the groups. RESULTS: The number of patients admitted urgently increased from 37 in 2019 to 54 in 2020, with a higher prevalence of men in 2020 (83.3% compared to 56.8%, respectively). Elective cases, on the other hand, declined from 279 in 2019 to 256 in 2020. Among the latter, more subjects had manifestations of heart failure (p < 0.001), coronary artery disease (CAD; p = 0.002), hypertension (p = 0.006), as well as had a history of a stroke (p = 0.002). In the meantime, more TAVI and fewer SAVR procedures were performed in 2020 (86 compared to 127 and 192 compared to 125, respectively; p < 0.001). In 2020, TAVI individuals had risk of death (according to the EuroSCORE scale) than in 2019 (p < 0.001). The probability of annual survival was comparable (p = 0.769) among AVD patients treated before and during the coronavirus pandemic (91.3% compared to 88.3%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Although during the COVID-19 pandemic more nonelective and higher-risk AVD individuals received interventional treatment, the outcomes were comparable to the pre-pandemic era (2019). Our findings support highly valuable, less invasive therapeutic methods for treating aortic pathologies during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Disease , Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
7.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 34(8): 1873-1883, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1995921

ABSTRACT

AIM: We estimated the proportion and severity of cognitive disorders in an unselected population of patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Second, we describe clinical and cognitive outcomes at 1 year. METHODS: Eligible patients were aged ≥ 70 years, with symptomatic aortic stenosis and an indication for TAVI. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was used to assess cognitive dysfunction (CD), defined as no CD if score ≥ 26, mild CD if 18-25; moderate CD if 10-18, and severe CD if < 10. We assessed survival and in-hospital complications at 6 months and 1 year. RESULTS: Between June 2019 and October 2020, 105 patients were included; 21 (20%) did not undergo TAVI, and thus, 84 were analyzed; median age 85 years, 53.6% females, median EuroScore 11.5%. Median MoCA score was 22 (19-25); CD was excluded in 18 (21%), mild in 50 (59.5%), moderate in 15 (19%) and severe in 1. Mean MoCA score at follow-up was 21.9(± 4.69) and did not differ significantly from baseline (21.79 (± 4.61), p = 0.73). There was no difference in success rate, in-hospital complications, or death across CD categories. CONCLUSION: The clinical course of patients with mild or moderate CD is not different at 1 year after TAVI compared to those without cognitive dysfunction.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Cognitive Dysfunction , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aged, 80 and over , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
8.
Clin Res Cardiol ; 111(8): 924-933, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1958986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Based on the results of several recent randomized trials, European and American guidelines on valvular heart disease management have substantially expanded the indications for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We present an all-comer data on peri-operative risk profile and in-hospital outcomes from Germany for patients treated by TAVI or isolated surgical aortic valve replacement (iSAVR) in 2020, providing an opportunity to compare study data with data from daily clinical practice. METHODS: Data concerning all isolated aortic valve procedures performed in Germany in 2020 were retrieved from the mandatory nationwide quality control program. Expected mortality was calculated with the annually revised German Aortic valve score (AKL-score) based on the data of either catheter-based (AKL-CATH) or isolated surgical (AKL-CHIR) aortic valve replacement in Germany from the previous year (2019). RESULTS: In 2020 21,903 TAVI procedures (20,810 transvascular (TV; vs. 2019: 22.973; - 9.4%), 1093 transapical (TA; vs. 2019: 1413; - 22.6%)) and 6144 (vs. 2019 7905; - 22.5%) iSAVR were performed in Germany. Patients who received TAVI showed a significantly higher perioperative risk profile than patients undergoing iSAVR based on older age and more severe co-morbidities. While in-hospital mortality after TAVI (2.3%) was numerically lower than in 2019 (2.5%), this difference was not significant (p = 0.11). In-hospital mortality after iSAVR was identical in 2020 and 2019 (2.8%) and thus higher than after TAVI (p = 0.003), resulting in an observed expected mortality ratio of 1.02 after TAVI and 1.05 after iSAVR. After exclusion of the emergency procedures, in-hospital mortality did not differ significantly between the groups (TAVI 2.2% vs. iSAVR 1.9%, p = 0.26). CONCLUSION: Total numbers of both iSAVR and TAVI in Germany were lower in 2020 than in 2019, most likely due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the relative number of patients treated by TAVI as compared to iSAVR continues to increase. Despite older age and more severe comorbidities compared to patients undergoing iSAVR the in-hospital mortality after TAVI continued to decrease in 2020 and remains significantly lower than after iSAVR.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/surgery , Germany/epidemiology , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Card Surg ; 37(10): 3417-3420, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937964

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hemostatic disturbances with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can predispose to tricuspid and right heart thrombi in very rare instances. AIM: We describe a 29-year-old female patient without a previous cause of thrombosis who developed large tricuspid valve thrombus (TVT) and moderate-to-severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) during the course of COVID-19 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Persistant fever and tachycardia with thrombocytopenia and high d-dimer increased the index of suspicion. The diagnosis was made by bedside transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Surgery was performed for thrombectomy and tricuspid valve replacement with a tissue valve. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Detection of TVT in COVID-19 patients on the basis of high index of suspicion, bedside TTE and noninvasive CMR helps early surgical treatment and subsequent reduction of mortality and hospital stay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Thrombosis , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Echocardiography , Female , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Humans , Thrombosis/diagnostic imaging , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/surgery , Tricuspid Valve/diagnostic imaging , Tricuspid Valve/pathology , Tricuspid Valve/surgery , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency/diagnostic imaging , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency/etiology , Tricuspid Valve Insufficiency/surgery
10.
Hellenic J Cardiol ; 67: 36-41, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914446

ABSTRACT

AIMS: COVID-19 had a devastating impact on patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). Like many cardiac procedures, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) services were suspended during the first wave of COVID-19. We took the opportunity to evaluate the clinical outcomes and identify any delays at different stages of the TAVR pathway during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Prospectively collected data on 210 consecutive TAVR patients between March 2019 and March 2021 were analysed. We compared the clinical outcomes and 30-day mortality rates of TAVR cases pre-pandemic and during the pandemic. We also looked to identify any time lags from the initial referral to respective stages of the TAVR workup. RESULTS: A total of 134 patients underwent TAVR prior to the national lockdown (March 2019-March 2020), compared to 76 patients during COVID-19 (April 2020-April 2021). Success rates of TAVR were similar (99% prior to the pandemic and 97.4% during COVID-19). The 30-day survival rates were 98.6% and 94.7%, respectively. Median length of stay post TAVR was 2 days during COVID-19 and 2.5 days prior to the pandemic (p = 0.064). Patients were seen quicker in clinic (median of 33 days) during COVID-19, compared to 51 days before COVID-19 (p = 0.044). No significant difference in times from referral to discussion at TAVR multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings, CT Aortogram and TAVR implantation, in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Reconfiguring the patient pathway during COVID-19 allowed TAVR to be performed safely, with a similar success rate and no excess complications or increased 30-day mortality. There proved to be no delay in the respective stages of patient TAVR workup, during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Tertiary Care Centers , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/methods , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
Clin Ther ; 44(4): 491-507, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719499

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a class I recommendation after valvular surgery. Few data exist on the level of access to CR after surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), and the factors affecting the probability of timely access to CR after SAVR have never been empirically investigated. This study aims at estimating the proportion of SAVR patients who initiated timely CR and understanding to what extent timely access to CR for SAVR patients is influenced by specific characteristics of patients and hospitals. METHODS: We conducted a real-world, retrospective, population-based study by identifying from the Italian National Hospital Discharge Records all the discharged alive SAVR patients who accessed timely CR from 2009-2016. Two different cutoffs for timely access were considered, i.e. one and 21 days after discharge. A unique dataset was constructed by merging several data sources. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to identify the factors influencing the probability to access to timely CR. FINDINGS: 107,545 patients underwent SAVR in Italy from 2009-2016 and were discharged alive. Overall, 71,593 SAVR patients (66.6%) accessed timely CR, with an increasing trend over time. Additional 6,149 patients (5.7%) started CR from 2-21 days after discharge, slightly decreasing over time. The probability of timely CR (one-day cutoff) was significantly higher in older (OR=1.025, p<0.001) female patients (OR = 1.003, p<0.05) and patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular comorbidities. Presence of rehabilitation wards and number of rehabilitation beds in the index hospital significantly increased the probability of timely access to CR (OR = 1.105, p<0.001 and OR = 1.006, p<0.001 respectively). Patients hospitalized in private teaching hospitals had the highest predicted probability of timely CR after SAVR. A substantial variation in access to CR was found across Italian regions. Similar results were obtained with the alternative 21-days cutoff. IMPLICATIONS: Approximately one-third of SAVR patients did not benefit from CR in Italy, mainly due to shortness of rehabilitation facilities, with relevant disparities across the country. The cessation of CR services during the COVID-19 pandemic provides the opportunity to re-think and innovate CR, shifting from center-based to home-based models. Digital health technologies can supplement traditional health services and grant safe, effective, and equitable access to care, especially for countries with insufficient rehabilitation bed capacity. As CR is associated with better outcomes, we recommend decision-makers to use our results to plan adequate healthcare services, also investing in digital health, to ensure patients' access to cost-effective care.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , COVID-19 , Cardiac Rehabilitation , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement , Aged , Aortic Valve/surgery , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
12.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 92(2)2021 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556232

ABSTRACT

Stuck valve is a very rare and severe complication that occurs in mechanical valve replacement patients with ineffective anticoagulation. However, with COVID-19 restriction measures, it became challenging to regularly assess INR to make sure it falls within the target therapeutic range to prevent this complication. We present a series of 10 patients who either underwent transthoracic echocardiography for a suspected stuck valve or were seen at the outpatient valve clinic with the residual consequences of a stuck valve during the COVID-19 restriction measures in our institute. Stuck prosthetic valves incident has increased significantly during this period, particularly those in the mitral position for which urgent replacement and prolonged hospitalization were necessary. Particularly with the COVID-19 restrictions in place, these cases highlight the need for physicians to be aware of the dramatic increase in the incidence of stuck prosthetic valves in patients on chronic warfarin therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Echocardiography , Heart Valve Prosthesis/adverse effects , Humans , Incidence
14.
Cardiovasc Revasc Med ; 28S: 54-56, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1368596

ABSTRACT

Undertreatment of patients with severe mitral regurgitation (MR) has been exaggerated during the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Expedited workup and shortened post-procedural hospital stay after percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) would be incredibly helpful to relieve the constrain in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic and immediately afterward. We report a patient who underwent PMVR with a simplified pre-operative workup, a shortened hospital stay, and expedited discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Mitral Valve Insufficiency , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Humans , Mitral Valve/diagnostic imaging , Mitral Valve/surgery , Mitral Valve Insufficiency/diagnostic imaging , Mitral Valve Insufficiency/surgery , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(13)2021 07 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302318

ABSTRACT

Wearable devices (WDs) can objectively assess patient-reported outcomes (PROMs) in clinical trials. In this study, the feasibility and acceptability of using commercial WDs in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) will be explored. This is a prospective observational study. Participants were trained to use a WD and a smartphone to collect data on their physical activity, rest heart rate and number of hours of sleep. Validated questionnaires were also used to evaluate these outcomes. A technology acceptance questionnaire was used at the end of the follow up. In our participants an overall good compliance in wearing the device (75.1% vs. 79.8%, SAVR vs. TAVR) was assessed. Half of the patients were willing to continue using the device. Perceived ease of use is one of the domains that scored higher in the technology acceptance questionnaire. In this study we observed that the use of a WD is accepted in our frail population for an extended period. Even though commercial WDs are not tailored for clinical research, they can produce useful information on patient behavior, especially when coordinated with intervention tailored to the single patient.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Stenosis , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Wearable Electronic Devices , Aged , Aortic Valve Stenosis/surgery , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
17.
Am Heart J ; 241: 14-25, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted routine cardiovascular care, with unclear impact on procedural deferrals and associated outcomes across diverse patient populations. METHODS: Cardiovascular procedures performed at 30 hospitals across 6 Western states in 2 large, non-profit healthcare systems (Providence St. Joseph Health and Stanford Healthcare) from December 2018-June 2020 were analyzed for changes over time. Risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality was compared across pandemic phases with multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Among 36,125 procedures (69% percutaneous coronary intervention, 13% coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 10% transcatheter aortic valve replacement, and 8% surgical aortic valve replacement), weekly volumes changed in 2 distinct phases after the initial inflection point on February 23, 2020: an initial period of significant deferral (COVID I: March 15-April 11) followed by recovery (COVID II: April 12 onwards). Compared to pre-COVID, COVID I patients were less likely to be female (P = .0003), older (P < .0001), Asian or Black (P = .02), or Medicare insured (P < .0001), and COVID I procedures were higher acuity (P < .0001), but not higher complexity. In COVID II, there was a trend toward more procedural deferral in regions with a higher COVID-19 burden (P = .05). Compared to pre-COVID, there were no differences in risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality during both COVID phases. CONCLUSIONS: Significant decreases in cardiovascular procedural volumes occurred early in the COVID-19 pandemic, with disproportionate impacts by race, gender, and age. These findings should inform our approach to future healthcare disruptions.


Subject(s)
Aortic Valve Disease/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Bypass/statistics & numerical data , Coronary Artery Disease/surgery , Hospital Mortality , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement/statistics & numerical data , Black or African American , Aged , Asian , Female , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Medicare , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , United States/epidemiology
18.
Cardiol Young ; 31(12): 2045-2047, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258530

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary valve endocarditis after transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation has been an emerging concern due to the increasing prevalence of transcatheter placement of pulmonary valve in the treatment of residual right ventricular outflow tract stenosis or regurgitation. Pulmonary valve endocarditis is a dreadful complication of transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation that have been reported with Melody valve (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN) and Edward Sapien valve (Edwards Life Sciences, Irvine, CA) till date. There are scanty available literatures for pulmonary valve endocarditis with Venus P valve (Venus Medtech, Hangzhou, China) implantation. Furthermore, cardiovascular comorbidity is common in COVID-19 infection with limited evidence of COVID-19 infection concomitant with infective endocarditis. This case happens to be the first reported case of infective endocarditis of pulmonary valve with concomitant COVID-19 infection and also delayed presentation of pulmonary valve endocarditis with Venus P valve implantation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Endocarditis , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation , Heart Valve Prosthesis , Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency , Pulmonary Valve , Cardiac Catheterization , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Endocarditis/etiology , Endocarditis/surgery , Heart Valve Prosthesis/adverse effects , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/adverse effects , Humans , Prosthesis Design , Pulmonary Valve/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Valve/surgery , Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency/etiology , Pulmonary Valve Insufficiency/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
19.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195855

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The response to COVID-19 has required cancellation of all but the most urgent procedures; there is therefore a need for the reintroduction of a safe elective pathway. METHODS: This was a study of a pilot pathway performed at Barts Heart Centre for the admission of patients requiring elective coronary and structural procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic (April-June 2020). All patients on coronary and structural waiting lists were screened for procedural indications, urgency and adverse features for COVID-19 prognosis and discussed at dedicated multidisciplinary teams. Dedicated admission pathways involving preadmission isolation, additional consent, COVID-19 PCR testing and dedicated clean areas were used. RESULTS: 143 patients (101 coronary and 42 structural) underwent procedures (coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary intervention, transcatheter aortic valve intervention and MitralClip) during the study period. The average age was 68.2; 74% were male; and over 93% had one or more moderate COVID-19 risk factors. All patients were COVID-19 PCR negative on admission with (8.1%) COVID-19 antibody positive (swab negative). All procedures were performed successfully with low rates of procedural complications (9.8%). At 2-week follow-up, no patients had symptoms or confirmed COVID-19 infection with significant improvements in quality if life and symptoms. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that patients undergoing coronary and structural procedures can be safely admitted during the COVID-19 pandemic, with no patients contracting COVID-19 during their admission. Reassuringly, patients reflective of typical practice, that is, those at moderate or higher risk, were treated successfully. This pilot provides important information applicable to other settings, specialties and areas to reintroduce services safely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Coronary Angiography/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures , Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation/methods , Infection Control , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/trends , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Organizational Innovation , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Adjustment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Safety Management/organization & administration , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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