Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Sci Total Environ ; 821: 153310, 2022 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730093

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In summer 2020 under the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has made public warnings that specific preventive measures such as maskwearing and stay-at-home orders, may increase heatstroke risk. In our previous work, we found a lower risk of heatstroke-related ambulance dispatches (HSAD) during the COVID-19 period, however, it is uncertain whether similar risk reductions can be observed in different vulnerable subgroups. This study aimed to determine the HSAD risk during the COVID-19 pandemic by age, severity, and incident place subgroups. METHOD: A summer-specific (June-September), time-series analysis was performed, using daily HSAD and meteorological data from 47 Japanese prefectures from 2017 to 2020. A two-stage analysis was applied to determine the association between HSAD and COVID-19 pandemic, adjusting for maximum temperature, humidity, seasonality, and relevant temporal adjustments. A generalized linear model was utilized in the first stage to estimate the prefecture-specific effect estimates. Thereafter, a fixed effect meta-analysis in the second stage was implemented to pool the first stage estimates. Subsequently, subgroup analysis via an interaction by age, severity, and incident place was used to analyze the HSAD risk among subgroups. RESULTS: A total of 274,031 HSAD cases was recorded across 47 Japanese prefectures. The average total number of HSAD in the pre-COVID-19 period was 69,721, meanwhile, the COVID-19 period was 64,869. Highest reductions in the risks was particularly observed in the young category (ratio of relative risk (RRR) = 0.54, 95% Confidential Interval (CI): 0.51, 0.57) compared to the elderly category. Whereas highest increment in the risks were observed in severe/death (RRR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.13, 1.37) compared to the mild category. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 situation exhibited a non-uniform change in the HSAD risk for all subgroups, with the magnitude of the risks varying by age, severity, and incident place.


Subject(s)
Ambulances , COVID-19 , Heat Stroke , Ambulances/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services , Heat Stroke/epidemiology , Humans , Humidity , Japan , Pandemics
2.
Ind Health ; 59(5): 325-333, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363586

ABSTRACT

Surgical masks are widely used for the prevention of respiratory infections. However, the risk of heat stroke during intense work or exercise in hot and humid environment is a concern. This study aimed to examine whether wearing a surgical mask increases the risk of heat stroke during mild exercise in such environment. Twelve participants conducted treadmill exercise for 30 min at 6 km/h, with 5% slope, 35°C ambient temperature, and 65% relative humidity, while wearing or not a surgical mask (mask and control trials, respectively). Rectal temperature (Trec), ear canal temperature (Tear), and mean skin temperature (mean Tskin) were assessed. Skin temperature and humidity of the perioral area of the face (Tface and RHface) were also estimated. Thermal sensation and discomfort, sensation of humidity, fatigue, and thirst were rated using the visual analogue scale. Trec, Tear, mean Tskin, and Tface increased during the exercise, without any difference between the two trials. RHface during the exercise was greater in the mask trial. Hot sensation was greater in the mask trial, but no influence on fatigue and thirst was found. These results suggest that wearing a surgical mask does not increase the risk of heat stroke during mild exercise in moist heat.


Subject(s)
Heat Stroke , Masks , Body Temperature , Body Temperature Regulation , Heart Rate , Hot Temperature , Humans , Humidity , Skin Temperature
3.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 28(13): 16682-16689, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241701

ABSTRACT

Heat-related illnesses (HRIs), mainly heat exhaustion (HE) and heat stroke (HS), are characterized by an elevation of core body temperature. In this study, we aimed to explore the HRIs' types and patient characteristics among a sample taken from various representative in-field points in the Hajj season. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2018 at 80 data collection points distributed in the field. Data related to demographics, features and risk factors were collected and analyzed from all encountered cases with suspected HRIs. Moreover, we developed a diagnostic tree for HRIs by using the XGBoost model. Out of the 1200 persons encountered during the study period, 231 fulfilled the criteria of HRIs spectrum and were included in this study. Around 6% had HS and 20% had HE. All HS cases (100%) were from outside of Saudi Arabia as compared with 72.5% diagnosed with HE (27.5% were from Saudi Arabia). In addition, 16% were considered as heat-induced muscle spasms, and 7% had limb heat edema. Additionally, most of HRIs cases were reported between 11 am and 1 pm. The HRIs diagnostic tree model gave a diagnostic accuracy of 93.6%. This study highlights the magnitude of HRIs among pilgrims in Hajj and provides a diagnostic tree that can aid in the risk stratification and diagnosis of these patients. We advise the implementation of more educational campaigns to pilgrims regarding preventable measures especially for the vulnerable groups (e.g. from outside Saudi Arabia, those with comorbidities and light-skinned people).


Subject(s)
Heat Stroke , Hot Temperature , Cross-Sectional Studies , Heat Stroke/diagnosis , Humans , Saudi Arabia , Travel
5.
Sci Total Environ ; 768: 145176, 2021 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062592

ABSTRACT

In 2020, Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought a huge impact in daily life and has prompted people to take preventive measures. In the summertime, however, the Japanese government has cautioned that some COVID-19 pandemic conditions may affect the risk to heatstroke. This study investigated how the COVID-19 pandemic setting affected heatstroke-related ambulance dispatches (HSAD). Daily HSAD data and relevant weather parameters from June to September from 2016 to 2020 of 47 prefectures in Japan were obtained from the Fire and Disaster Management Agency (FDMA) database. A binary variable representing COVID-19 impact was created, whereby years 2016 to 2019 were coded as 0, while 2020 as 1. We employed a two-stage analysis in elucidating the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on HSAD. Firstly, we regressed HSAD with the COVID-19 binary variable after adjusting for relevant covariates to obtain prefecture-specific effect estimates. Prefecture-specific estimates were subsequently pooled via random effects meta-analysis in generating the pooled estimate. Pooled Relative Risk (RR) of HSAD during the COVID-19 pandemic was 0.78 (95% Confidential Interval [CI], 0.75-0.82). We found an overall statistically significant decrease in HSAD risk during the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. Specifically, the decrease in the risk of HSAD may be linked to the COVID-19 precautionary measures such as stay-home request and availability of alternative consultation services, which may have decreased the direct exposure of the population to extreme heat.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heat Stroke , Ambulances , Heat Stroke/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Nippon Med Sch ; 88(1): 80-86, 2021 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736471

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and heat-related illness are systemic febrile diseases. These illnesses must be differentiated during a COVID-19 pandemic in summer. However, no studies have compared and distinguished heat-related illness and COVID-19. We compared data from patients with early heat-related illness and those with COVID-19. METHODS: This retrospective observational study included 90 patients with early heat-related illness selected from the Heatstroke STUDY 2017-2019 (nationwide registries of heat-related illness in Japan) and 86 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who had fever or fatigue and were admitted to one of two hospitals in Tokyo, Japan. RESULTS: Among vital signs, systolic blood pressure (119 vs. 125 mm Hg, p = 0.02), oxygen saturation (98% vs. 97%, p < 0.001), and body temperature (36.6°C vs. 37.6°C, p<0.001) showed significant between-group differences in the heatstroke and COVID-19 groups, respectively. The numerous intergroup differences in laboratory findings included disparities in white blood cell count (10.8 × 103/µL vs. 5.2 × 103/µL, p<0.001), creatinine (2.2 vs. 0.85 mg/dL, p<0.001), and C-reactive protein (0.2 vs. 2.8 mg/dL, p<0.001), although a logistic regression model achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.966 using these three factors. A Random Forest machine learning model achieved an accuracy, precision, recall, and AUC of 0.908, 0.976, 0.842, and 0.978, respectively. Creatinine was the most important feature of this model. CONCLUSIONS: Acute kidney injury was associated with heat-related illness, which could be essential in distinguishing or evaluating patients with fever in the summer during a COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Creatinine/blood , Heat Stroke/diagnosis , Seasons , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Climate , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Heat Stroke/blood , Heat Stroke/complications , Hot Temperature , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Tokyo
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL