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1.
Nat Commun ; 13(1): 4054, 2022 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931408

ABSTRACT

Establishment of zoonotic viruses, causing pandemics like the Spanish flu and Covid-19, requires adaptation to human receptors. Pandemic influenza A viruses (IAV) that crossed the avian-human species barrier switched from binding avian-type α2-3-linked sialic acid (2-3Sia) to human-type 2-6Sia receptors. Here, we show that this specificity switch is however less dichotomous as generally assumed. Binding and entry specificity were compared using mixed synthetic glycan gradients of 2-3Sia and 2-6Sia and by employing a genetically remodeled Sia repertoire on the surface of a Sia-free cell line and on a sialoglycoprotein secreted from these cells. Expression of a range of (mixed) 2-3Sia and 2-6Sia densities shows that non-binding human-type receptors efficiently enhanced avian IAV binding and entry provided the presence of a low density of high affinity avian-type receptors, and vice versa. Considering the heterogeneity of sialoglycan receptors encountered in vivo, hetero-multivalent binding is physiologically relevant and will impact evolutionary pathways leading to host adaptation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A virus , Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919 , Influenza, Human , Animals , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/metabolism , Humans , Influenza A virus/metabolism , N-Acetylneuraminic Acid/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism
2.
J Virol ; 96(7): e0010022, 2022 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1728835

ABSTRACT

Understanding how animal influenza A viruses (IAVs) acquire airborne transmissibility in humans and ferrets is needed to prepare for and respond to pandemics. Here, we investigated in ferrets the replication and transmission of swine H1N1 isolates P4 and G15, whose majority population had decreased polymerase activity and poor hemagglutinin (HA) stability, respectively. For both isolates, a minor variant was selected and transmitted in ferrets. Polymerase-enhancing variant PA-S321 airborne-transmitted and propagated in one ferret. HA-stabilizing variant HA1-S210 was selected in all G15-inoculated ferrets and was transmitted by contact and airborne routes. With an efficient polymerase and a stable HA, the purified minor variant G15-HA1-S210 had earlier and higher peak titers in inoculated ferrets and was recovered at a higher frequency after airborne transmission than P4 and G15. Overall, HA stabilization played a more prominent role than polymerase enhancement in the replication and transmission of these viruses in ferrets. The results suggest pandemic risk-assessment studies may benefit from deep sequencing to identify minor variants with human-adapted traits. IMPORTANCE Diverse IAVs circulate in animals, yet few acquire the viral traits needed to start a human pandemic. A stabilized HA and mammalian-adapted polymerase have been shown to promote the adaptation of IAVs to humans and ferrets (the gold-standard model for IAV replication, pathogenicity, and transmissibility). Here, we used swine IAV isolates of the gamma lineage as a model to investigate the importance of HA stability and polymerase activity in promoting replication and transmission in ferrets. These are emerging viruses that bind to both α-2,6- and α-2,3-linked receptors. Using isolates containing mixed populations, a stabilized HA was selected within days in inoculated ferrets. An enhanced polymerase was also selected and propagated after airborne transmission to a ferret. Thus, HA stabilization was a stricter requirement, yet both traits promoted transmissibility. Knowing the viral traits needed for pandemic potential, and the relative importance of each, will help identify emerging viruses of greatest concern.


Subject(s)
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Orthomyxoviridae Infections , Animals , Ferrets , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/chemistry , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/metabolism , Humans , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/transmission , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Protein Stability , Swine
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2594, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692553

ABSTRACT

Complex glycans decorate viral surface proteins and play a critical role in virus-host interactions. Viral surface glycans shield vulnerable protein epitopes from host immunity yet can also present distinct "glycoepitopes" that can be targeted by host antibodies such as the potent anti-HIV antibody 2G12 that binds high-mannose glycans on gp120. Two recent publications demonstrate 2G12 binding to high mannose glycans on SARS-CoV-2 and select Influenza A (Flu) H3N2 viruses. Previously, our lab observed 2G12 binding and functional inhibition of a range of Flu viruses that include H3N2 and H1N1 lineages. In this manuscript, we present these data alongside structural analyses to offer an expanded picture of 2G12-Flu interactions. Further, based on the remarkable breadth of 2G12 N-glycan recognition and the structural factors promoting glycoprotein oligomannosylation, we hypothesize that 2G12 glycoepitopes can be defined from protein structure alone according to N-glycan site topology. We develop a model describing 2G12 glycoepitopes based on N-glycan site topology, and apply the model to identify viruses within the Protein Data Bank presenting putative 2G12 glycoepitopes for 2G12 repurposing toward analytical, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/metabolism , HIV Antibodies/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/immunology , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Dogs , Drug Repositioning , Epitopes , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/metabolism , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype/metabolism , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neutralization Tests , Polysaccharides/metabolism
4.
FASEB J ; 35(2): e21358, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1062891

ABSTRACT

Treatment of respiratory viral infections remains a global health concern, mainly due to the inefficacy of available drugs. Therefore, the discovery of novel antiviral compounds is needed; in this context, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) like temporins hold great promise. Here, we discovered that the harmless temporin G (TG) significantly inhibited the early life-cycle phases of influenza virus. The in vitro hemagglutinating test revealed the existence of TG interaction with the viral hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Furthermore, the hemolysis inhibition assay and the molecular docking studies confirmed a TG/HA complex formation at the level of the conserved hydrophobic stem groove of HA. Remarkably, these findings highlight the ability of TG to block the conformational rearrangements of HA2 subunit, which are essential for the viral envelope fusion with intracellular endocytic vesicles, thereby neutralizing the virus entry into the host cell. In comparison, in the case of parainfluenza virus, which penetrates host cells upon a membrane-fusion process, addition of TG to infected cells provoked ~1.2 log reduction of viral titer released in the supernatant. Nevertheless, at the same condition, an immunofluorescent assay showed that the expression of viral hemagglutinin/neuraminidase protein was not significantly reduced. This suggested a peptide-mediated block of some late steps of viral replication and therefore the impairment of the extracellular release of viral particles. Overall, our results are the first demonstration of the ability of an AMP to interfere with the replication of respiratory viruses with a different mechanism of cell entry and will open a new avenue for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against a large variety of respiratory viruses, including the recent SARS-CoV2.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/drug effects , Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human/drug effects , A549 Cells , Animals , Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Dogs , HN Protein/chemistry , HN Protein/metabolism , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/chemistry , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/metabolism , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Molecular Docking Simulation , Parainfluenza Virus 1, Human/physiology , Protein Binding , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication
5.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100017, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910220

ABSTRACT

Through annual epidemics and global pandemics, influenza A viruses (IAVs) remain a significant threat to human health as the leading cause of severe respiratory disease. Within the last century, four global pandemics have resulted from the introduction of novel IAVs into humans, with components of each originating from avian viruses. IAVs infect many avian species wherein they maintain a diverse natural reservoir, posing a risk to humans through the occasional emergence of novel strains with enhanced zoonotic potential. One natural barrier for transmission of avian IAVs into humans is the specificity of the receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin (HA), which recognizes sialic-acid-containing glycans on host cells. HAs from human IAVs exhibit "human-type" receptor specificity, binding exclusively to glycans on cells lining the human airway where terminal sialic acids are attached in the α2-6 configuration (NeuAcα2-6Gal). In contrast, HAs from avian viruses exhibit specificity for "avian-type" α2-3-linked (NeuAcα2-3Gal) receptors and thus require adaptive mutations to bind human-type receptors. Since all human IAV pandemics can be traced to avian origins, there remains ever-present concern over emerging IAVs with human-adaptive potential that might lead to the next pandemic. This concern has been brought into focus through emergence of SARS-CoV-2, aligning both scientific and public attention to the threat of novel respiratory viruses from animal sources. In this review, we summarize receptor-binding adaptations underlying the emergence of all prior IAV pandemics in humans, maintenance and evolution of human-type receptor specificity in subsequent seasonal IAVs, and potential for future human-type receptor adaptation in novel avian HAs.


Subject(s)
Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/metabolism , Influenza A virus/metabolism , Influenza in Birds/epidemiology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pandemics , Polysaccharides/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Adaptation, Physiological , Animals , Binding Sites , Biological Coevolution , Birds/virology , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/chemistry , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/genetics , Humans , Influenza A virus/chemistry , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza in Birds/transmission , Influenza in Birds/virology , Influenza, Human/transmission , Influenza, Human/virology , Models, Molecular , Polysaccharides/metabolism , Protein Binding , Receptors, Virus/chemistry , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Respiratory System/virology , Sialic Acids/chemistry , Sialic Acids/metabolism , Species Specificity
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