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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(31): e29305, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1978275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients of end-stage renal disease are prone to have a very low quality of life (QoL). Variety of factors influence the QoL among sufferers of chronic kidney disease comprising of type of dialysis, sufficiency/adequacy of dialysis, and associated burden of disease. We conducted this study amidst the pandemic to determine the associated factors for poor QoL in hemodialysis patients during the ongoing pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a hemodialysis unit of a tertiary care hospital. A total of 118 participants responded to the validated questionnaire of Quality of Life Index-dialysis version-III (QLI). Higher scores signify good QoL, total scores are further categorized into subgroups desirable, relatively desirable and undesirable. RESULTS: The mean age of the participants was 57.36 ± 10.03 years and mean body mass index of 26.73 ± 5.54 kg/m2. The mean total QoL of the study population was found quite low (12.99 ± 5.89). Majority of respondents fell in undesirable category of QoL (49.2%). Total QoL (P = 0.004) and subscale health/functioning (P = 0.003) were significantly lower in females. All the subscales along with total QoL scores were found lower in twice-weekly dialyzed patients (P < 0.001). Marital status (P = 0.049) and twice-weekly dialysis (P < 0.001) were found significant with undesirable QoL. On multivariate analysis, significant determinants of undesirable QoL were twice-weekly dialysis (P = 0.001), catheter access (P = 0.034), phosphate (P = 0.005) and uric acid (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: Inadequate dialysis due to lesser frequency per week leading to poorly cleared toxic substances were most significant contributors of poor QoL in our study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Developing Countries , Female , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Renal Dialysis , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Nephrol Dial Transplant ; 37(7): 1357-1365, 2022 06 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868340

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) have an increased risk of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and a reduced response to vaccines. Data are needed to identify immune correlates of protection in this population. METHODS: Following a COVID-19 outbreak among vaccinated patients in a HD unit, clinical data and serological response to BNT162b2 vaccine were retrospectively recorded. RESULTS: Among 53 patients present in the dialysis room, 14 were infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) alpha variant (COVID_Pos) and 39 were not. Compared with uninfected patients, COVID_Pos patients more frequently had additional causes of immunosuppression (50% versus 21%; P = .046) and were more often scheduled on the Monday-Wednesday-Friday (MWF) shift (86% versus 39%; P = .002). Moreover, COVID_Pos had lower anti-spike (S) immunoglobulin G (IgG) titres than uninfected patients {median 24 BAU/mL [interquartile range (IQR) 3-1163] versus 435 [99-2555]; P = .001} and lower neutralization titres [median 108 (IQR 17-224) versus 2483 (481-43 908); P = .007]. Anti-S and neutralization antibody titres are correlated (r = 0.92, P < .001). In multivariable analysis, an MWF schedule {odds ratio [OR] 10.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-93.5], P = .014} and anti-S IgG titres 1 month before the outbreak [<205 BAU/mL: OR 0.046 (95% CI 0.002-0.29), P = .006] were independently associated with COVID-19 infection. None of the patients with anti-S IgG >284 BAU/mL got infected. Ten of 14 COVID_Pos patients were treated with casirivimab and imdevimab. No patient developed severe disease. CONCLUSIONS: Anti-S IgG titre measured prior to exposure correlates to protection from SARS-CoV-2 infection in HD patients. BNT162b2 vaccination alone or in combination with monoclonal antibodies prevented severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259970, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526691

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly threatening to patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) on intermittent hemodialysis and their care providers. Hemodialysis patients who receive life-sustaining medical therapy in healthcare settings, face unique challenges as they need to be at a dialysis unit three or more times a week, where they are confined to specific settings and tended to by dialysis nurses and staff with physical interaction and in close proximity. Despite the importance and critical situation of the dialysis units, modelling studies of the SARS-CoV-2 spread in these settings are very limited. In this paper, we have used a combination of discrete event and agent-based simulation models, to study the operations of a typical large dialysis unit and generate contact matrices to examine outbreak scenarios. We present the details of the contact matrix generation process and demonstrate how the simulation calculates a micro-scale contact matrix comprising the number and duration of contacts at a micro-scale time step. We have used the contacts matrix in an agent-based model to predict disease transmission under different scenarios. The results show that micro-simulation can be used to estimate contact matrices, which can be used effectively for disease modelling in dialysis and similar settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Computer Simulation , Humans , Models, Statistical
6.
J Nephrol ; 35(1): 113-120, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340493

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with end-stage-renal-disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis (HD) represent a vulnerable population for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, due to their intrinsic fragility and increased exposure to the virus. Therefore, applying effective screening strategies and infection control measures is essential to control the spread of the epidemic within hemodialysis centers. OBJECTIVE: Description and evaluation of the efficacy of systematic screening by rt-PCR and viral cultures, in addition to triage to limit the spread of the epidemic. Evaluation of the performance of these tests using "post-hoc" SARS-CoV-2 serology as a surrogate marker of infection. METHODS: One hundred and forty-four patients undergoing hemodialysis in the Nephrology-Hemodialysis center of CHU Brugmann, Brussels, benefited from systematic virological screening using viral cultures in asymptomatic patients, or molecular tests (rt-PCR) for symptomatic ones, in addition to general prevention measures. Post-hoc serology was performed in all patients. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (26.3%) individuals were infected with SARS-CoV-2. Seventeen infected patients (44.7%) were asymptomatic and thus detected by viral culture. Our strategy allowed us to detect and isolate 97.4% of the infected patients, as proven by post-hoc serology. Only one patient, missed by clinical screening and sequential viral cultures, had a positive serology. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a control and prevention strategy based on a systematic clinical and virological screening showed its effectiveness in limiting (and shortening) the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic within our hemodialysis unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Triage
7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 678738, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315961

ABSTRACT

Background: Infections are the second leading cause of death among patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, preventive measures against infectious diseases are limited and have not been made mandatory for patients. Objective: To investigate the incidence of infectious diseases before and during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Design: A historical comparative study of a prospective cohort. Setting(s): February 1, 2015 to January 31, 2020 was defined as the period before the mitigative confrontation of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. The period from February 1 to June 29, 2020 was defined as the period of mitigative confrontation of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Participants: A cohort of patients undergoing hemodialysis whose infectious disease episodes were documented prospectively in the hemodialysis unit of the Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University since February 1, 2015. Methods: Mandatory mask-wearing and reinforced hand-hygiene education were implemented to prevent COVID-19 from January 23, 2020 in China. The incidence of infectious episodes, including catheter-related infection, digestive tract infection, upper respiratory tract infection (UTRI), pneumonia, and infection at other sites, were documented and compared in the periods before and during the pandemic. Results: The historical control group consisted of 157 patients, with 79 patients in the COVID-19 prevention group. The mask-wearing rate of patients increased from 1.5 to 100%. Hand sanitizer consumption increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic. The compliance rates of hand hygiene increased from 66, 75.5, to 55% in physicians, nurses, and other employees before the pandemic to 90.5, 92.5, and 76.5%, respectively. The incidences of UTRI and pneumonia decreased during the pandemic (p < 0.001). Notably, catheter-related and digestive tract infections also decreased during the pandemic (p = 0.003 and 0.034, respectively). A matched-pair study was conducted to further analyze the 79 individual changes in the incidences of infectious disease before and during the pandemic. As a result, the incidences of UTRI, pneumonia, catheter-related infections, digestive tract infections, and infections at other sites all decreased during the pandemic. Conclusions: The present study indicated an association between mandatory mask-wearing and reinforced hand hygiene education and decreased respiratory, catheter-related, and digestive tract infection episodes in the hemodialysis unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Hand Hygiene , China/epidemiology , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Nephrol ; 95(3): 151-156, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1134401

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent SARS-CoV-2 outbreak represents a global health emergency, and dialysis patients are a high-risk population. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in hemodialysis facilities require specific protocols to be planned and promptly executed for the management of suspected/confirmed cases of COVID-19 with respect to prevention, protection, screening, and isolation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in our Hemodialysis Unit, we adopted individual protection measures accompanied by measures to minimize contacts among hemodialysis patients with suspicious symptoms as well as other patients and medical staff. We provided our patients detailed instructions to be followed in the event of their having symptoms compatible with SARS-CoV-2 infection or having contacts with SARS-CoV-2-positive subjects. Ultimately, four possible scenarios and care paths were developed and implemented in collaboration with the Infectious Diseases and Emergency Units at the Padua University Hospital. RESULTS: The application of this strategy has resulted in the nearly 200 patients treated in our hemodialysis facilities while there were only 2 cases of COVID-19 (1% incidence rate) with no deaths. CONCLUSION: We attribute the low COVID-19 incidence noted so far for patients in our hemodialysis facilities to the early detection and prompt isolation of suspected patients per our specific plan along with the prompt application of preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Infection Control/methods , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Renal Dialysis/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrology , Patient Education as Topic , Patient Isolation , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ren Fail ; 42(1): 950-957, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124758

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly, which poses great challenges to patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Here we report the clinical features of 66 hemodialysis patients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infection. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: Retrospective, single-center case series of the 66 hemodialysis patients with confirmed COVID-19 from 1 January to 5 March 2020; the final date of follow-up was 25 March 2020. RESULTS: The clinical data were collected from 66 hemodialysis patients with confirmed COVID-19. The incidence of COVID-19 in our center was 11.0% (66/602), of which 18 patients died. According to different prognosis, hemodialysis patients with COVID-19 were divided into the survival and death group. A higher incidence of fever and dyspnea was found in the death group compared with the survival group. Meanwhile, patients in the death group were often accompanied by higher white blood cell count, prolonged PT time, increased D-dimer (p < .05). More patients in the death group showed hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes damage. Furthermore, logistic regression analysis suggested that fever, dyspnea, and elevated D-dimer were independent risk factors for death in hemodialysis patients with COVID-19 (OR, 1.077; 95% CI, 1.014 to 1.439; p = .044; OR, 1.146; 95% CI, 1.026 to 1.875; p = .034, OR, 4.974; 95% CI, 3.315 to 6.263; p = .007, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The potential risk factors of fever, dyspnea, and elevated D-dimer could help clinicians to identify hemodialysis patients with poor prognosis at an early stage of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Dyspnea , Fever , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Risk Assessment/methods , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Female , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/epidemiology , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prognosis , Renal Dialysis/methods , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
11.
CMAJ ; 193(8): E278-E284, 2021 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105842

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing long-term dialysis may be at higher risk of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and of associated disease and mortality. We aimed to describe the incidence, risk factors and outcomes for infection in these patients in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: We used linked data sets to compare disease characteristics and mortality between patients receiving long-term dialysis in Ontario who were diagnosed SARS-CoV-2 positive and those who did not acquire SARS-CoV-2 infection, between Mar. 12 and Aug. 20, 2020. We collected data on SARS-CoV-2 infection prospectively. We evaluated risk factors for infection and death using multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: During the study period, 187 (1.5%) of 12 501 patients undergoing dialysis were diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Of those with SARS-CoV-2 infection, 117 (62.6%) were admitted to hospital and the case fatality rate was 28.3%. Significant predictors of infection included in-centre hemodialysis versus home dialysis (odds ratio [OR] 2.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-4.05), living in a long-term care residence (OR 7.67, 95% CI 5.30-11.11), living in the Greater Toronto Area (OR 3.27, 95% CI 2.21-4.80), Black ethnicity (OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.95-4.77), Indian subcontinent ethnicity (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.02-2.81), other non-White ethnicities (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.38-2.97) and lower income quintiles (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.15-2.89). INTERPRETATION: Patients undergoing long-term dialysis are at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and death from coronavirus disease 2019. Special attention should be paid to addressing risk factors for infection, and these patients should be prioritized for vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario , Risk Factors
12.
Clin Exp Nephrol ; 25(6): 652-659, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068749

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Blood purification therapy is a treatment method, wherein many patients gather in the same space to receive regular treatments, possibly increasing the risk of contracting the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) through contact, droplet, and aerosol. We experienced a nosocomial outbreak and evaluated the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 infection in patients undergoing blood purification therapy. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 28 patients who underwent blood purification therapy at the dialysis center of our hospital from April 2, 2020, to April 29, 2020. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify clinical factors related to COVID-19 for 18 patients who were tested using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Of the 28 patients, seven were COVID-19 positive, as confirmed by RT-PCR. The median age was 77 years, 22 patients were male (79%), four patients had acute kidney injury (14%), and six patients were bedridden (21%). All infected patients had been admitted to the wards where the nosocomial outbreak had occurred. Logistic regression analysis revealed that being bedridden (odds ratio 13.33, 95% confidence interval 1.05-169.56, p < 0.05) was significantly related to COVID-19 infection. However, the Charlson comorbidity index, receiving dialysis in the same room, and adjacency of the dialysis bed to COVID-19-positive patients before the confirmation of infection did not reveal any significant relationship. CONCLUSION: Bedridden patients admitted to nosocomial infection wards were associated with COVID-19 infection, and transmission within the dialysis center was not observed. More rigorous infection control measures need to be implemented for bedridden patients undergoing blood purification therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/therapy , Cross Infection/transmission , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Middle Aged , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies
13.
CMAJ ; 193(8): E278-E284, 2021 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067436

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing long-term dialysis may be at higher risk of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and of associated disease and mortality. We aimed to describe the incidence, risk factors and outcomes for infection in these patients in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: We used linked data sets to compare disease characteristics and mortality between patients receiving long-term dialysis in Ontario who were diagnosed SARS-CoV-2 positive and those who did not acquire SARS-CoV-2 infection, between Mar. 12 and Aug. 20, 2020. We collected data on SARS-CoV-2 infection prospectively. We evaluated risk factors for infection and death using multivariable logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: During the study period, 187 (1.5%) of 12 501 patients undergoing dialysis were diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Of those with SARS-CoV-2 infection, 117 (62.6%) were admitted to hospital and the case fatality rate was 28.3%. Significant predictors of infection included in-centre hemodialysis versus home dialysis (odds ratio [OR] 2.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.59-4.05), living in a long-term care residence (OR 7.67, 95% CI 5.30-11.11), living in the Greater Toronto Area (OR 3.27, 95% CI 2.21-4.80), Black ethnicity (OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.95-4.77), Indian subcontinent ethnicity (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.02-2.81), other non-White ethnicities (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.38-2.97) and lower income quintiles (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.15-2.89). INTERPRETATION: Patients undergoing long-term dialysis are at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and death from coronavirus disease 2019. Special attention should be paid to addressing risk factors for infection, and these patients should be prioritized for vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario , Risk Factors
14.
Clin Nephrol ; 95(3): 151-156, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent SARS-CoV-2 outbreak represents a global health emergency, and dialysis patients are a high-risk population. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in hemodialysis facilities require specific protocols to be planned and promptly executed for the management of suspected/confirmed cases of COVID-19 with respect to prevention, protection, screening, and isolation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in our Hemodialysis Unit, we adopted individual protection measures accompanied by measures to minimize contacts among hemodialysis patients with suspicious symptoms as well as other patients and medical staff. We provided our patients detailed instructions to be followed in the event of their having symptoms compatible with SARS-CoV-2 infection or having contacts with SARS-CoV-2-positive subjects. Ultimately, four possible scenarios and care paths were developed and implemented in collaboration with the Infectious Diseases and Emergency Units at the Padua University Hospital. RESULTS: The application of this strategy has resulted in the nearly 200 patients treated in our hemodialysis facilities while there were only 2 cases of COVID-19 (1% incidence rate) with no deaths. CONCLUSION: We attribute the low COVID-19 incidence noted so far for patients in our hemodialysis facilities to the early detection and prompt isolation of suspected patients per our specific plan along with the prompt application of preventive measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Infection Control/methods , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Renal Dialysis/methods , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrology , Patient Education as Topic , Patient Isolation , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Blood Purif ; 50(3): 390-398, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917824

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic led to increased demand nationwide for dialysis equipment, including supplies and machines. To meet the demand in our institution, our surge plan included rapid mobilization of a novel continuous renal replacement treatment (CRRT) machine named SAMI. The SAMI is a push-pull filtration enhanced dialysis machine that can conjugate extremely high single-pass solute removal efficiency with very precise fluid balance control. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Machine assembly was conducted on-site by local biomedical engineers with remote assistance by the vendor. One 3-h virtual training session of 3 dialysis nurses was conducted before SAMI deployment. The SAMI was deployed in prolonged intermittent replacement therapy (PIRRT) mode to maximize patients covered per machine per day. Live on-demand vendor support was provided to troubleshoot any issues for the first few cases. After 4 weeks of the SAMI implementation, data on treatments with the SAMI were collected, and a questionnaire was provided to the nurse trainees to assess device usability. RESULTS: On-site installation of the SAMI was accomplished with remote assistance. Delivery of remote training was successfully achieved. 23 PIRRT treatments were conducted in 10 patients. 7/10 of patients had CO-VID-19. The median PIRRT dose was 50 mL/kg/h (IQR [interquartile range] 44 - 62 mL/kg/h), and duration of the treatment was 8 h (IQR 6.3 - 8 h). Solute control was adequate. The user response was favorable to the set of usability questions involving user interface, on-screen instructions, machine setup, troubleshooting, and the ease of moving the machine. CONCLUSION: Assembly of the SAMI and training of nurses remotely are possible when access to vendor employees is restricted during states of emergency. The successful deployment of the SAMI in our institution during the pandemic with only 3-h virtual training supports that operating the SAMI is simple and safe.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/instrumentation , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/organization & administration , Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy/instrumentation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Attitude of Health Personnel , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy/nursing , Data Collection , Dialysis Solutions/administration & dosage , Disposable Equipment , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Equipment Design , Equipment Failure , Heparin/administration & dosage , Humans , Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy/nursing , Maintenance and Engineering, Hospital/organization & administration , Medical Waste Disposal , Prescriptions , Robotics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Virtual Reality
16.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e226, 2020 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-867334

ABSTRACT

Data on the possibility of transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) during the provision of chronic haemodialysis, which often entails many person-to-person contacts, are lacking. We report a follow-up of the in-centre contacts of three positive chronic haemodialysis patients. Under strict preventive measures, only one patient out of 21 patient-contacts and 29 personnel-contacts tested positive within 2 weeks after the last contact. This patient, case #3, most likely became infected during unprotected, organised group transportation to the dialysis centre.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aged , Betacoronavirus/physiology , COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Slovenia/epidemiology , Transportation
17.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(10)2020 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841363

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, a 74-year-old man affected by end-stage renal disease and on peritoneal dialysis was referred to an emergency room in Modena, Northern Italy, due to fever and respiratory symptoms. After ruling out COVID-19 infection, a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation was confirmed and he was thus transferred to the nephrology division. Physical examination and blood tests revealed a positive fluid balance and insufficient correction of the uraemic syndrome, although peritoneal dialysis prescription was maximised. After discussion with the patient and his family, the staff decided to start hybrid dialysis, consisting of once-weekly in-hospital haemodialysis and home peritoneal dialysis for the remaining days. He was discharged at the end of the antibiotic course, after an internal jugular vein central venous catheter placement and the first haemodialysis session. This strategy allowed improvement of depuration parameters and avoidance of frequent access to the hospital, which is crucial in limiting exposure to SARS-CoV-2 in an endemic setting.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Kidney Failure, Chronic , Pandemics , Peritoneal Dialysis/methods , Pneumonia, Viral , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Renal Dialysis/methods , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Combined Modality Therapy/trends , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnosis, Differential , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , Kidney Failure, Chronic/physiopathology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Male , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Flare Up
18.
Nefrologia (Engl Ed) ; 40(3): 279-286, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-820202

ABSTRACT

Dialysis patients are a risk group for SARS-CoV-2 infection and possibly further complications, but we have little information. The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of the first month of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in a hospital haemodialysis (HD) unit serving the district of Madrid with the second highest incidence of COVID-19 (almost 1,000 patients in 100,000h). In the form of a diary, we present the actions undertaken, the incidence of COVID-19 in patients and health staff, some clinical characteristics and the results of screening all the patients in the unit. We started with 90 patients on HD: 37 (41.1%) had COVID-19, of whom 17 (45.9%) were diagnosed through symptoms detected in triage or during the session, and 15 (40.5%) through subsequent screening of those who, until that time, had not undergone SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing. Fever was the most frequent symptom, 50% had lymphopenia and 18.4% <95% O2 saturation. Sixteen (43.2%) patients required hospital admission and 6 (16.2%) died. We found a cluster of infection per shift and also among those using public transport. In terms of staff, of the 44 people involved, 15 (34%) had compatible symptoms, 4 (9%) were confirmed as SARS-CoV-2 PCR cases by occupational health, 9 (20%) required some period of sick leave, temporary disability to work (ILT), and 5 were considered likely cases. CONCLUSIONS: We detected a high prevalence of COVID-19 with a high percentage detected by screening; hence the need for proactive diagnosis to stop the pandemic. Most cases are managed as outpatients, however severe symptoms are also appearing and mortality to date is 16.2%. In terms of staff, 20% have required sick leave in relation to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Clinical Protocols , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital/organization & administration , Humans , Incidence , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Symptom Assessment , Time Factors , Triage/methods , Young Adult
20.
Iran J Kidney Dis ; 14(5): 389-398, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-777137

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Seven months after the emergence of SARS-COV-2 virus, there is paucity of data regarding the epidemiology of the virus in hemodialysis patients. We aim to present the results of the screening program implied after outbreak of COVID-19 in a referral hemodialysis ward. METHODS: We started clinical screening and obligatory mask wearing for dialysis patients and personnel on 20-Feb-2020. However 11 symptomatic COVID-19 patients emerged till day +36. On days +39 and +40 a screening program was implied including measurement of SARS-COV-2 PCR and immunoglobulin G and M (IgG/IgM) and chest computerized tomography (CCT) scan. The results of CCT scan, classified according to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) Reporting and Data System (CO-RADS) classification; as with very low (grade 1-normal), low, indeterminate, high, and very high likelihood of COVID-19 (grades 2, 3, 4, and 5; respectively), were used for compartmentalization of patients. RESULTS: Among 178 patients (68.2% male, mean age = 58.7 ± 16.6 years), 11 got COVID-19 before screening, two of whom died. CCT scans were normal in 71.3% and grade 2, 3, 4, and 5 in 7.9%, 4.5%, 5.6%, and 10.7%; respectively. PCR and IgG and/or IgM were positive in 27 and 32 patients. Eighty-three patients had evidence of COVID-19 infection, who were significantly older (62.2 ± 16.6 vs. 56.1 ± 16.02, P < .05). There was no difference in the rate of infection considering gender, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and different blood groups. CONCLUSION: Asymptomatic SARS- COV 2 infection may affect a large number of dialysis patients. We highly recommend a screening strategy whenever the number of patients is increasing.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Hemodialysis Units, Hospital , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Incidence , Iran/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Male , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Renal Dialysis , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
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