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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 24(11)2023 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238442

ABSTRACT

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by hemolysis and thrombosis and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although complement inhibitors have significantly changed the outcomes in PNH patients, breakthrough hemolysis (BTH) may still occur as a response to stress factors such as pregnancy, surgery, and infections. Despite the well-described association between bacterial infections and hemolysis in PNH patients, little is known about the effect of respiratory viruses on triggering hemolytic episodes. This is the first study, to our knowledge, addressing this question. We retrospectively analyzed 34 patients with PNH disease between 2016 and 2018, who were on eculizumab treatment and who presented with respiratory symptoms and were subsequently tested for 10 respiratory viruses (influenza A, influenza B, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, rhinovirus, and human metapneumovirus). NTS+ patients had higher inflammatory markers, with the majority requiring antibiotics. Acute hemolysis, along with a significant drop in hemoglobin, was noted in the NTS+ group, with three of them requiring a top-up transfusion and two requiring an extra dose of eculizumab. Furthermore, the time from the last eculizumab dose was longer in the NTS+ patients who had BTH, than those who did not. Our data indicate that respiratory virus infections pose a significant risk for BTH in PNH patients on complement inhibitor treatment, underlining the need for regular screening and close monitoring of patients with respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, it implies a higher risk for patients who are not established on complement inhibitors, suggesting the necessity for greater vigilance in these patients.


Subject(s)
Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal , Influenza, Human , Humans , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/complications , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/drug therapy , Hemolysis , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies , Complement Inactivating Agents/therapeutic use , Adenoviridae
2.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1180509, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321967

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined by increased erythrocyte turnover mediated by autoimmune mechanisms. While corticosteroids remain first-line therapy in most cases of warm-antibody AIHA, cold agglutinin disease is treated by targeting the underlying clonal B-cell proliferation or the classical complement activation pathway. Several new established or investigational drugs and treatment regimens have appeared during the last 1-2 decades, resulting in an improvement of therapy options but also raising challenges on how to select the best treatment in individual patients. In severe warm-antibody AIHA, there is evidence for the upfront addition of rituximab to prednisolone in the first line. Novel agents targeting B-cells, extravascular hemolysis, or removing IgG will offer further options in the acute and relapsed/refractory settings. In cold agglutinin disease, the development of complement inhibitors and B-cell targeting agents makes it possible to individualize therapy, based on the disease profile and patient characteristics. For most AIHAs, the optimal treatment remains to be found, and there is still a need for more evidence-based therapies. Therefore, prospective clinical trials should be encouraged.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune , Humans , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/drug therapy , Prospective Studies , Rituximab/therapeutic use , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Hemolysis
3.
Rinsho Ketsueki ; 64(3): 224-229, 2023.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2303692

ABSTRACT

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a disorder in which an activated complement causes intravascular hemolysis of erythrocytes that do not have complement regulators. It is critical to monitor the rapid progression of hemolysis caused by infection and thrombosis. As far as we can tell, this is the first report of 5 COVID-19 patients with PNH in Japan. Three patients were being treated with ravulizumab, one with eculizumab, and one with crovalimab. All five cases had received two or more COVID-19 vaccinations. COVID-19 was classified as mild in four cases and moderate in one. None of the cases required the use of oxygen, and none became severe. All of them experienced breakthrough hemolysis, and two required red blood cell transfusions. In any case, no thrombotic complications were observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal , Thrombosis , Humans , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/therapy , Hemolysis , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Erythrocytes
4.
ESC Heart Fail ; 10(2): 1449-1453, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2263752

ABSTRACT

Furosemide, a loop diuretic, is commonly used to treat fluid overload symptoms and heart failure. Drug-induced immune haemolytic anaemia is an unusual drug-adverse event. Furosemide-induced haemolysis is even rarer. This case report presents a 91-year-old male who developed acute haemolytic anaemia 3 days after initiating furosemide to treat myocardial infarction complicated with acute decompensated heart failure. He had increased lactate dehydrogenase and unconjugated bilirubin with undetectable haptoglobin, which indicated the destruction of red blood cells. Other causes for haemolytic anaemia, including hereditary, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, and paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria, were also excluded. He improved with drug cessation and a short course of glucocorticoids. This report aims to raise awareness of this rare complication caused by commonly prescribed drugs. Despite a negative result of a direct antiglobulin test, physicians must remain suspicious of drug-induced immune haemolytic anaemia in unclear cases of haemolysis.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic , Heart Failure , Male , Humans , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Furosemide/adverse effects , Hemolysis , Anemia, Hemolytic/chemically induced , Anemia, Hemolytic/diagnosis , Heart Failure/chemically induced , Heart Failure/complications
6.
Drug Deliv ; 29(1): 386-398, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2187330

ABSTRACT

The potential of nucleic acid therapeutics to treat diseases by targeting specific cells has resulted in its increasing number of uses in clinical settings. However, the major challenge is to deliver bio-macromolecules into target cells and/or subcellular locations of interest ahead in the development of delivery systems. Although, supercharged residues replaced protein 36 + GFP can facilitate itself and cargoes delivery, its efficiency is still limited. Therefore, we combined our recent progress to further improve 36 + GFP based delivery efficiency. We found that the penetration efficacy of 36 + GFP protein was significantly improved by fusion with CPP-Dot1l or treatment with penetration enhancer dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in vitro. After safely packaged with plasmid DNA, we found that the efficacy of in vitro and in vivo transfection mediated by 36 + GFP-Dot1l fusion protein is also significantly improved than 36 + GFP itself. Our findings illustrated that fusion with CPP-Dot1l or incubation with DMSO is an alternative way to synergically promote 36 + GFP mediated plasmid DNA delivery in vitro and in vivo.


Subject(s)
Cell-Penetrating Peptides/pharmacokinetics , Drug Delivery Systems/methods , Green Fluorescent Proteins/pharmacokinetics , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/pharmacokinetics , Nucleic Acids/administration & dosage , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Survival/drug effects , Dimethyl Sulfoxide/chemistry , Green Fluorescent Proteins/chemistry , Hemolysis/drug effects , Humans , Mice , Particle Size , Surface Properties , Transfection/methods
7.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2165381, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2187763

ABSTRACT

Herein, we report the case of a 22-year-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis (HS) whose condition worsened after administration of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), mRNA vaccine 'BNT162b2 Pfizer-BioNTech.' The woman had been diagnosed with HS in 2005, and her condition remained stable until February 2021. In March 2021, she received the first dose of the above vaccine and experienced pain at the injection site. After the second dose in April 2021, she developed fever and general malaise. Investigations revealed progression of hemolysis, which improved after a few days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of progression of hemolysis in a patient with HS after administration of the mRNA vaccine COVID-19, BNT162b2 'Pfizer-BioNTech.'


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , BNT162 Vaccine , Hemolysis , COVID-19/prevention & control
8.
Nihon Yakurigaku Zasshi ; 157(6): 422-425, 2022.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098631

ABSTRACT

Sepsis is one of the leading cause of death worldwide. Recently, several studies suggested that free-hemoglobin and heme derived from hemolysis are important factors which may be associated with severity of septic patients including COVID-19. In other words, hemolysis-derived products enhance the inflammatory responses as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) in both intravascular and extravascular space. In addition, hemoglobin has vasoconstrictive activity by depleting nitric oxide, whereas heme or Fe2+ produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) through Fenton reaction leading to tissue injury. At present, we have no therapeutic options against sepsis-related hemolysis in clinical settings, however, there might be two therapeutic strategies in this regard. One is supplemental therapy of depleted scavenging proteins such as haptoglobin and hemopexin, the other is activation of the internal scavenging system including macrophage-CD163 pathway. These novel targets against sepsis are also critical for the next pandemic. In this review, we summarize the current issues regarding sepsis-related hemolysis including COVID-19, as well as for future perspectives.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Humans , Hemolysis , COVID-19/complications , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Alarmins , Heme/metabolism
9.
Molecules ; 27(19)2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066272

ABSTRACT

Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), as a Gram-positive bacterium, can cause severe bacterial pneumonia, and result in high morbidity and mortality in infected people. Meanwhile, isolated drug-resistant S. pneumoniae is growing, which raises concerns about strategies for combatting S. pneumoniae infection. To disturb S. pneumoniae pathogenicity and its drug-resistance, developing novel anti-infective strategies or compounds is urgent. In this study, the anti-infective effect of shionone was explored. A minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and growth curve determination were performed to evaluate the effect of the tetracyclic triterpenoid compound shionone against S. pneumoniae. Hemolysis tests, western blotting, oligomerization inhibition assays, and molecular docking were carried out to explore the anti-infective mechanism of shionone. Moreover, the protective effect of shionone was also confirmed in a mousepneumonia model. The results showed that the excellent hemolytic inhibitory activity of shionone was observed at less than 8 µg/mL. Meanwhile, shionone could disturb the oligomerization of pneumolysin (PLY) but did not interfere with PLY expression at less than 4 µg/mL. Molecular docking suggested that shionone targeted the ASP-59, ILE-60, THR-57, PHE-344, and ASN-346 amino acid sites to reduce S. pneumoniae pathogenicity. Furthermore, shionone alleviated lung histopathologic injury and decreased lung bacterial colonization in vivo. The above results showed that shionone could bind to the PLY active pocket under the concentrations of 8 µg/mL and neutralize PLY hemolysis activity to reduce S. pneumoniae pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury , Triterpenes , Amino Acids/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/metabolism , Hemolysis , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Streptococcus pneumoniae , Streptolysins/metabolism , Streptolysins/pharmacology , Triterpenes/pharmacology
10.
Front Immunol ; 13: 956671, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022740
11.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(8)2022 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2019952

ABSTRACT

A male in his teens with a history of liver transplant for biliary atresia (aged 2 years) and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA, aged 6 years) presented with jaundice, dark urine, fatigue and chest discomfort that began 48 hours after the first dose of SARS-CoV-2 Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine (BNT162b2 mRNA). Investigations revealed a warm AIHA picture. Over 4 weeks the patient developed life-threatening anaemia culminating in haemoglobin of 35 g/L (after transfusion), lactate dehydrogenase of 1293 units/L and bilirubin of 228 µmol/L, refractory to standard treatment with corticosteroids and rituximab. An emergency splenectomy was performed that slowed haemolysis but did not completely ameliorate it. Eculizumab, a terminal complement pathway inhibitor, was initiated to arrest intravascular haemolysis and showed a favourable response. AIHA is rare but described after the SARS-CoV-2 Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. This case highlights the rare complication of AIHA, the use of emergency splenectomy for disease control, and the use of eculizumab.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/complications , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , BNT162 Vaccine/administration & dosage , BNT162 Vaccine/adverse effects , Bilirubin , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Complement Inactivating Agents/therapeutic use , Hemoglobins , Hemolysis , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Lactate Dehydrogenases , Male , RNA, Messenger/therapeutic use , Rituximab/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Splenectomy/adverse effects
12.
J Clin Lab Anal ; 36(9): e24629, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) is associated with various diseases. Several studies of CAS associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) reported hemolytic anemia and thrombosis; however, the clinical significance of cold agglutinins (CA) in patients with COVID-19 is unclear. Here, we present two cases of CA identified in the context of COVID-19 without hemolytic anemia and clotting. CASE REPORT AND DISCUSSION: Two patients with no known risk factors for CA were diagnosed with COVID-19; peripheral blood smears reveal red blood cells (RBCs) agglutination. These patients showed a high CA titer. We confirmed retrospectively that the CA was an anti-I antibody. The two COVID-19 cases with a high CA titer showed no hemolysis or thrombosis. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is known to cause CAS, but not all patients who have a high CA titer show hemolysis. Coagulation abnormalities are documented in severe COVID-19 cases. Although CA increases the risk of thrombosis in those with lymphoproliferative diseases, the role of anti-I antibodies in COVID-19 is unclear. The impact of CAS on clinical presentations in COVID-19 remains a matter of verification. CONCLUSIONS: A high CA titer was identified in COVID-19 patients without hemolytic anemia and clotting. Anti-I antibodies were identified. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology of CA in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune , Anemia, Hemolytic , COVID-19 , Antibodies , Cryoglobulins , Hemolysis , Humans , Retrospective Studies
14.
Immunobiology ; 227(4): 152240, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914499

ABSTRACT

Previous case reports have described patients with COVID-19-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), and cold agglutinin disease (CAD) which is characterized by a positive direct antiglobulin (DAT) or "Coombs" test, yet the mechanism is not well understood. To investigate the significance of Coombs test reactivity among COVID-19 patients, we conducted a retrospective study on hospitalized COVID-19 patients treated at NMC Royal Hospital between 15 April and 30 May 2020. There were 27 (20%) patients in the Coombs-positive group and 108 (80%) in the Coombs-negative group. The cold agglutinin titer was examined in 22 patients due to symptoms suggestive of cold agglutinin disease, and all tested negative. We demonstrated a significant association with reactive Coombs test results in univariate analysis through clinical findings such as ICU admission rate, the severity of COVID-19, and several laboratory findings such as CRP, D-dimer, and hemoglobin levels lactate dehydrogenase, and RDW-CV. However, only hemoglobin levels and disease severity had a statistically significant association in multivariate analysis. A possible explanation of COVID-19-associated positive Coombs is cytokine storm-induced hyperinflammation, complement system activation, alterations of RBCs, binding of SARS-CoV-2 proteins to hemoglobin or its metabolites, and autoantibody production. Coombs-positive patients were tested for hemolysis using indirect bilirubin, consumed haptoglobin, and/or peripheral smear that ruled out any evidence of hemolysis. Understanding this etiology sheds new light on RBC involvement as a pathophysiological target for SARS-CoV-2 by interfering with their function; consequently, therapies capable of restoring RBC function, such as erythrocytapheresis, could be repurposed for the treatment of worsening severe and critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune , COVID-19 , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/diagnosis , Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune/drug therapy , Antibodies, Anti-Idiotypic/therapeutic use , Coombs Test/methods , Hemoglobins , Hemolysis , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Hematol ; 116(1): 55-59, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877965

ABSTRACT

Autoimmune and complement-related hematological side effects have been observed with messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines. Here, we report the incidence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine-induced hemolysis in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). We reviewed the medical records of seventeen patients with PNH visiting the University of Tsukuba Hospital who had received two doses of the SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine between May 2021 and November 2021. Twelve patients were being treated with complement inhibitors. The median age of all patients was 62 years (range 29-89 years).; six were males and eleven were females. Fourteen patients received the BNT162b2 vaccine (Pfizer/BioNTech) and three received the mRNA-1273 vaccine (Moderna). The median percentages of PNH clones in erythrocytes and granulocytes were 37.61% (range 8.11-85.71%) and 59.73% (range 3.76-97.82%), respectively. Of the twelve patients receiving complement inhibitors, only one had a hemolytic reaction after vaccination, but it did not meet the definition of breakthrough hemolysis. By contrast, hemolytic attacks were observed in two of the five untreated patients with PNH, and one of them required a blood transfusion. Appropriate administration of complement inhibitors to patients with PNH may prevent hemolysis induced by SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal , Hemolysis , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , BNT162 Vaccine/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Complement Inactivating Agents/therapeutic use , Female , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/complications , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/drug therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
16.
Transfusion ; 62(7): 1446-1451, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874476

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hyperhemolysis syndrome (HHS) is a severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction seen in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, characterized by destruction of donor and recipient RBCs. It results in a drop in hemoglobin to below pretransfusion levels and frequently reticulocytopenia. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a man in his thirties with SCD with a recent hospitalization 2 weeks prior for COVID-19. His red cell antibody history included anti-Fy(a) and warm autoantibody. At that time, he was given 2 units of RBC and discharged with a hemoglobin of 10.2 g/dl. He returned to the hospital approximately 1.5 weeks later with hemoglobin 6.0 g/dl and symptoms concerning for acute chest syndrome. Pretransfusion testing now showed 4+ pan-agglutinin in both gel-based and tube-based testing. Alloadsorption identified an anti-N and a strong cold agglutinin. Three least incompatible units were transfused to this patient over several days, with evidence of hemolysis. Further reference lab work revealed anti-Fya , anti-Fyb , anti-Lea , anti-Leb , and an anti-KN system antibody. The patient's hemoglobin nadired at 4.4 g/dl. The patient was treated with a single dose of tocilizumab, his hemoglobin stabilized, and he was discharged. DISCUSSION: We present a case of HHS proximate to recent SARS-CoV-2 infection with multiple allo and autoantibodies identified. Information on the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 infection and HHS is limited; however, it is possible that inflammation related to COVID-19 could predispose to HHS. Tocilizumab is an approved treatment for COVID-19. Additionally, tocilizumab appears to be a promising treatment option for patients with HHS.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Sickle Cell , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , COVID-19 , Anemia, Sickle Cell/complications , Anemia, Sickle Cell/therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Erythrocyte Transfusion/adverse effects , Hemoglobins , Hemolysis , Humans , Isoantibodies , Male , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Curr Top Med Chem ; 22(16): 1307-1325, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1847036

ABSTRACT

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme that regulates energy metabolism mainly through the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). It is well known that this enzyme participates in the antioxidant/oxidant balance via the synthesis of energy-rich molecules: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH), the reduced form of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH) and glutathione (GSH), controlling reactive oxygen species generation. Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a public health problem that has caused approximately 4.5 million deaths since December 2019. Concerning the role of G6PD in COVID-19 development, it is known from the existing literature that G6PD-deficient patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 are more susceptible to thrombosis and hemolysis, suggesting that G6PD deficiency facilitates infection by SARS-CoV-2. Concerning G6PD and neuropathology, it has been observed that deficiency of this enzyme is also present with an increase in oxidative markers. Concerning the role of G6PD and the neurological manifestations of COVID-19, it has been reported that the enzymatic deficiency in patients infected with SARSCoV- 2 exacerbates the disease, and, in some clinical reports, an increase in hemolysis and thrombosis was observed when patients were treated with hydroxychloroquine (OH-CQ), a drug with oxidative properties. In the present work, we summarize the evidence of the role of G6PD in COVID- 19 and its possible role in the generation of oxidative stress and glucose metabolism deficits, and inflammation present in this respiratory disease and its progression including neurological manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Glutathione/metabolism , Hemolysis , Humans , Oxidative Stress , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Rinsho Ketsueki ; 63(3): 224-228, 2022.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780264

ABSTRACT

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a lethal disease resulting in systemic thrombotic microangiopathies due to complement dysregulation. Immune activation by viral infections, such as SARS-CoV-2, may trigger hemolytic attack. A 38-year-old man, who had been previously diagnosed with aHUS due to complement component 3 mutation, was proven to be positive for SARS-CoV-2 without respiratory symptoms. No specific intervention was given to the patient, and he developed hematuria and oliguria three days after diagnosis. The patient was subsequently referred to our hospital and treated with eculizumab (900 mg). Afterward, the hemolytic symptoms improved rapidly. To the best of our knowledge, there have been reports of at least ten cases of hemolysis triggered by COVID-19 in patients with aHUS, and a potential clinical benefit of eculizumab for hemolytic attack, as well as for COVID-19, has been suggested. Here, we report the findings of a case, which indicate the efficacy of eculizumab introduction at an early stage.


Subject(s)
Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome , COVID-19 , Thrombotic Microangiopathies , Adult , Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome/diagnosis , COVID-19/complications , Hemolysis , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/diagnosis
20.
J Clin Apher ; 36(4): 628-633, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Criteria for selection of FFP blood type has not been clearly established and use of group AB plasma is preferred by numerous transplantation protocols. AIMS: This study assesses the safety and efficacy of alternative group A or B plasma in ABO incompatible solid organ transplantation. MATERIALS & METHODS: Alternative use of group A or B plasma (incompatible plasma) was inevitable during the shortage of group AB plasma. Experience from select number of patients during the period of extreme group AB plasma shortage is described. RESULTS: The result of alternative use of group A or B plasma was within expectation, showing effective reduction of isoagglutinin titers for pre-operative desensitization and efficacy for treatment of post-operative patients. No immediate hemolytic transfusion reaction was reported. DISCUSSION: While validation in a larger cohort of patients is necessary, our limited experience have shown satisfactory clinical outcomes without adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Use of incompatible group A or B plasma is a viable option when group AB plasma is limited.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System , Blood Group Incompatibility/therapy , Plasma Exchange/methods , Transplantation/methods , Agglutinins/chemistry , Blood Banks/supply & distribution , Graft Survival , Hemolysis , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Patient Safety , Plasma/immunology , Plasmapheresis , Transfusion Reaction , Treatment Outcome
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