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1.
J Cell Mol Med ; 26(1): 235-238, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555067

ABSTRACT

Due to the restrictions in accessing research laboratories and the challenges in providing proper storage and transportation of cells during the COVID-19 pandemic, having an effective and feasible mean to solve these challenges would be of immense help. Therefore, we developed a 3D culture setting of cancer cells using alginate beads and tested its effectiveness in different storage and transportation conditions. The viability and proliferation of cancer cells were assessed using trypan blue staining and quantitative CCK-8 kit, respectively. The developed beads allowed cancer cells survival up to 4 weeks with less frequent maintenance measures such as change of the culture media or subculture of cells. In addition, the recovery of cancer cells and proliferation pattern were significantly faster with better outcomes in the developed 3D alginate beads compared to the standard cryopreservation of cells or the 2D culture conditions. The 3D alginate beads also supported the viability of cells while the shipment at room temperature for a duration of up to 5 days with no humidity or CO2  support. Therefore, 3D culture in alginate beads can be used to store or ship biological cells with ease at room temperature with minimal preparations.


Subject(s)
Alginates/pharmacology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cell Culture Techniques , Hydrogels/pharmacology , Osteoblasts/drug effects , A549 Cells , Alginates/chemistry , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Cell Survival/drug effects , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Hydrogels/chemistry , Osteoblasts/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Time Factors
2.
Biomolecules ; 11(11)2021 11 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523862

ABSTRACT

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been widely used as porous nanomaterials for different applications ranging from industrial to biomedicals. An unpredictable one-pot method is introduced to synthesize NH2-MIL-53 assisted by high-gravity in a greener media for the first time. Then, porphyrins were deployed to adorn the surface of MOF to increase the sensitivity of the prepared nanocomposite to the genetic materials and in-situ cellular protein structures. The hydrogen bond formation between genetic domains and the porphyrin' nitrogen as well as the surface hydroxyl groups is equally probable and could be considered a milestone in chemical physics and physical chemistry for biomedical applications. In this context, the role of incorporating different forms of porphyrins, their relationship with the final surface morphology, and their drug/gene loading efficiency were investigated to provide a predictable pattern in regard to the previous works. The conceptual phenomenon was optimized to increase the interactions between the biomolecules and the substrate by reaching the limit of detection to 10 pM for the Anti-cas9 protein, 20 pM for the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), below 10 pM for the single guide RNA (sgRNA) and also around 10 nM for recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike antigen. Also, the MTT assay showed acceptable relative cell viability of more than 85% in most cases, even by increasing the dose of the prepared nanostructures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Metal-Organic Frameworks/chemistry , Porphyrins/chemistry , Animals , COVID-19 Testing , CRISPR-Cas Systems , DNA, Single-Stranded , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Limit of Detection , Nanocomposites , Nanostructures , Nitrogen/chemistry , PC12 Cells , Porosity , RNA, Guide , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Rats , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Surface Properties
3.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(41)2021 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450313

ABSTRACT

Cancer therapy reduces tumor burden via tumor cell death ("debris"), which can accelerate tumor progression via the failure of inflammation resolution. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop treatment modalities that stimulate the clearance or resolution of inflammation-associated debris. Here, we demonstrate that chemotherapy-generated debris stimulates metastasis by up-regulating soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) and the prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4). Therapy-induced tumor cell debris triggers a storm of proinflammatory and proangiogenic eicosanoid-driven cytokines. Thus, targeting a single eicosanoid or cytokine is unlikely to prevent chemotherapy-induced metastasis. Pharmacological abrogation of both sEH and EP4 eicosanoid pathways prevents hepato-pancreatic tumor growth and liver metastasis by promoting macrophage phagocytosis of debris and counterregulating a protumorigenic eicosanoid and cytokine storm. Therefore, stimulating the clearance of tumor cell debris via combined sEH and EP4 inhibition is an approach to prevent debris-stimulated metastasis and tumor growth.


Subject(s)
Eicosanoids/metabolism , Epoxide Hydrolases/biosynthesis , Macrophages/immunology , Neoplasm Metastasis/pathology , Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype/biosynthesis , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Cell Death/drug effects , Cell Line, Tumor , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/prevention & control , Cytokines/metabolism , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neoplasm Metastasis/prevention & control , Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Phagocytosis/immunology , RAW 264.7 Cells
4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 331, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392811

ABSTRACT

The recently emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is the causative agent of ongoing global pandemic of COVID-19, may trigger immunosuppression in the early stage and overactive immune response in the late stage of infection; However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we demonstrated that the SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein dually regulated innate immune responses, i.e., the low-dose N protein suppressed type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling and inflammatory cytokines, whereas high-dose N protein promoted IFN-I signaling and inflammatory cytokines. Mechanistically, the SARS-CoV-2 N protein dually regulated the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3, STAT1, and STAT2. Additionally, low-dose N protein combined with TRIM25 could suppress the ubiquitination and activation of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). Our findings revealed a regulatory mechanism of innate immune responses by the SARS-CoV-2 N protein, which would contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 and other SARS-like coronaviruses, and development of more effective strategies for controlling COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Immunity, Innate , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , A549 Cells , COVID-19/pathology , Caco-2 Cells , HEK293 Cells , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Interferon Type I/immunology , Phosphoproteins/immunology
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 16629, 2021 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361646

ABSTRACT

Since understanding molecular mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection is extremely important for developing effective therapies against COVID-19, we focused on the internalization mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 via ACE2. Although cigarette smoke is generally believed to be harmful to the pathogenesis of COVID-19, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) treatments were surprisingly found to suppress the expression of ACE2 in HepG2 cells. We thus tried to clarify the mechanism of CSE effects on expression of ACE2 in mammalian cells. Because RNA-seq analysis suggested that suppressive effects on ACE2 might be inversely correlated with induction of the genes regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), the AHR agonists 6-formylindolo(3,2-b)carbazole (FICZ) and omeprazole (OMP) were tested to assess whether those treatments affected ACE2 expression. Both FICZ and OMP clearly suppressed ACE2 expression in a dose-dependent manner along with inducing CYP1A1. Knock-down experiments indicated a reduction of ACE2 by FICZ treatment in an AHR-dependent manner. Finally, treatments of AHR agonists inhibited SARS-CoV-2 infection into Vero E6 cells as determined with immunoblotting analyses detecting SARS-CoV-2 specific nucleocapsid protein. We here demonstrate that treatment with AHR agonists, including FICZ, and OMP, decreases expression of ACE2 via AHR activation, resulting in suppression of SARS-CoV-2 infection in mammalian cells.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/agonists , COVID-19/drug therapy , Carbazoles/pharmacology , Omeprazole/pharmacology , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/agonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Carbazoles/therapeutic use , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Omeprazole/therapeutic use , RNA-Seq , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Vero Cells , Virus Internalization/drug effects
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 652223, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348483

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is highly contagious and presents a significant public health issue. Current therapies used to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) include monoclonal antibody cocktail, convalescent plasma, antivirals, immunomodulators, and anticoagulants. The vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna have recently been authorized for emergency use, which are invaluable for the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their long-term side effects are not yet documented, and populations with immunocompromised conditions (e.g., organ-transplantation and immunodeficient patients) may not be able to mount an effective immune response. In addition, there are concerns that wide-scale immunity to SARS-CoV-2 may introduce immune pressure that could select for escape mutants to the existing vaccines and monoclonal antibody therapies. Emerging evidence has shown that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)- natural killer (NK) immunotherapy has potent antitumor response in hematologic cancers with minimal adverse effects in recent studies, however, the potentials of CAR-NK cells in treating COVID-19 has not yet been fully exploited. Here, we improve upon a novel approach for the generation of CAR-NK cells for targeting SARS-CoV-2 and its various mutants. CAR-NK cells were generated using the scFv domain of S309 (henceforward, S309-CAR-NK), a SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAbs) that targets the highly conserved region of SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) glycoprotein and is therefore more likely to recognize different variants of SARS-CoV-2 isolates. S309-CAR-NK cells can specifically bind to pseudotyped SARS-CoV-2 virus and its D614G, N501Y, and E484K mutants. Furthermore, S309-CAR-NK cells can specifically kill target cells expressing SARS-CoV-2 S protein in vitro and show superior killing activity and cytokine production, compared to that of the recently reported CR3022-CAR-NK cells. Thus, these results pave the way for generating 'off-the-shelf' S309-CAR-NK cells for treatment in high-risk individuals as well as provide an alternative strategy for patients unresponsive to current vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , A549 Cells , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Receptors, Chimeric Antigen/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
8.
Cells ; 10(6)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264419

ABSTRACT

In late 2019, the betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was identified as the viral agent responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Coronaviruses Spike proteins are responsible for their ability to interact with host membrane receptors and different proteins have been identified as SARS-CoV-2 interactors, among which Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), and Basigin2/EMMPRIN/CD147 (CD147). CD147 plays an important role in human immunodeficiency virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections. In particular, SARS-CoV recognizes the CD147 receptor expressed on the surface of host cells by its nucleocapsid protein binding to cyclophilin A (CyPA), a ligand for CD147. However, the involvement of CD147 in SARS-CoV-2 infection is still debated. Interference with both the function (blocking antibody) and the expression (knock down) of CD147 showed that this receptor partakes in SARS-CoV-2 infection and provided additional clues on the underlying mechanism: CD147 binding to CyPA does not play a role; CD147 regulates ACE2 levels and both receptors are affected by virus infection. Altogether, these findings suggest that CD147 is involved in SARS-CoV-2 tropism and represents a possible therapeutic target to challenge COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Basigin/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Basigin/antagonists & inhibitors , Basigin/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Caco-2 Cells , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Hep G2 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Molecular Targeted Therapy , RNA Interference/physiology , RNA, Small Interfering/pharmacology , RNA, Small Interfering/therapeutic use , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Vero Cells , Viral Tropism/physiology
9.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 188: 114564, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188321

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2 is the pathogenetic agent of Corona Virus Induced Disease (COVID)19. The virus enters the human cells after binding to the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)2 receptor in target tissues. ACE2 expression is induced in response to inflammation. The colon expression of ACE2 is upregulated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), highlighting a potential risk of intestinal inflammation in promoting viral entry in the human body. Because mechanisms that regulate ACE2 expression in the intestine are poorly understood and there is a need of anti-SARS-CoV-2 therapies, we have settled to investigate whether natural flavonoids might regulate the expression of Ace2 in intestinal models of inflammation. The results of these studies demonstrated that pelargonidin activates the Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) in vitro and reverses intestinal inflammation caused by chronic exposure to high fat diet or to the intestinal braking-barrier agent TNBS in a AhR-dependent manner. In these two models, development of colon inflammation associated with upregulation of Ace2 mRNA expression. Colon levels of Ace2 mRNA were directly correlated with Tnf-α mRNA levels. Molecular docking studies suggested that pelargonidin binds a fatty acid binding pocket on the receptor binding domain of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein. In vitro studies demonstrated that pelargonidin significantly reduces the binding of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein to ACE2 and reduces the SARS-CoV-2 replication in a concentration-dependent manner. In summary, we have provided evidence that a natural flavonoid might hold potential in reducing intestinal inflammation and ACE2 induction in the inflamed colon in a AhR-dependent manner.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , Anthocyanins/pharmacology , Drug Discovery/methods , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/agonists , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Anthocyanins/chemistry , Chlorocebus aethiops , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Protein Structure, Secondary , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Vero Cells
10.
Cell Rep ; 34(11): 108872, 2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135279

ABSTRACT

Viruses need to hijack the translational machinery of the host cell for a productive infection to happen. However, given the dynamic landscape of tRNA pools among tissues, it is unclear whether different viruses infecting different tissues have adapted their codon usage toward their tropism. Here, we collect the coding sequences of 502 human-infecting viruses and determine that tropism explains changes in codon usage. Using the tRNA abundances across 23 human tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we build an in silico model of translational efficiency that validates the correspondence of the viral codon usage with the translational machinery of their tropism. For instance, we detect that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is specifically adapted to the upper respiratory tract and alveoli. Furthermore, this correspondence is specifically defined in early viral proteins. The observed tissue-specific translational efficiency could be useful for the development of antiviral therapies and vaccines.


Subject(s)
Protein Biosynthesis/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Viruses/genetics , Cell Line , Cell Line, Tumor , Codon Usage/genetics , Genes, Neoplasm/genetics , HCT116 Cells , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Pulmonary Alveoli/virology , RNA, Transfer/genetics , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Tropism/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , Virus Diseases/virology
11.
EMBO Mol Med ; 13(3): e13549, 2021 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1038772

ABSTRACT

A correct identification of seropositive individuals for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is of paramount relevance to assess the degree of protection of a human population to present and future outbreaks of the COVID-19 pandemic. We describe here a sensitive and quantitative flow cytometry method using the cytometer-friendly non-adherent Jurkat T-cell line that stably expresses the full-length native spike "S" protein of SARS-CoV-2 and a truncated form of the human EGFR that serves a normalizing role. S protein and huEGFRt coding sequences are separated by a T2A self-cleaving sequence, allowing to accurately quantify the presence of anti-S immunoglobulins by calculating a score based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities obtained by double-staining with the test sera and anti-EGFR. The method allows to detect immune individuals regardless of the result of other serological tests or even repeated PCR monitoring. As examples of its use, we show that as much as 28% of the personnel working at the CBMSO in Madrid is already immune. Additionally, we show that anti-S antibodies with protective neutralizing activity are long-lasting and can be detected in sera 8 months after infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Flow Cytometry/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adult , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/statistics & numerical data , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , ErbB Receptors/genetics , Female , Flow Cytometry/statistics & numerical data , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Jurkat Cells , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
12.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 60(12): 6799-6806, 2021 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985937

ABSTRACT

Activity-based probes are valuable tools for chemical biology. However, finding probes that specifically target the active site of an enzyme remains a challenging task. Herein, we present a ligand selection strategy that allows to rapidly tailor electrophilic probes to a target of choice and showcase its application for the two cysteine proteases of SARS-CoV-2 as proof of concept. The resulting probes were specific for the active site labeling of 3CLpro and PLpro with sufficient selectivity in a live cell model as well as in the background of a native human proteome. Exploiting the probes as tools for competitive profiling of a natural product library identified salvianolic acid derivatives as promising 3CLpro inhibitors. We anticipate that our ligand selection strategy will be useful to rapidly develop customized probes and discover inhibitors for a wide range of target proteins also beyond corona virus proteases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/chemistry , Molecular Probe Techniques , Molecular Probes/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/metabolism , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/metabolism , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Ligands , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Proof of Concept Study , Protein Binding , Small Molecule Libraries/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship
13.
Theranostics ; 11(2): 649-664, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940325

ABSTRACT

The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a worldwide epidemic of the lethal respiratory coronavirus disease (COVID-19), necessitating urgent development of specific and effective therapeutic tools. Among several therapeutic targets of coronaviruses, the spike protein is of great significance due to its key role in host invasion. Here, we report a potential anti-SARS-CoV-2 strategy based on the CRISPR-Cas13a system. Methods: A comprehensive set of bioinformatics methods, including sequence alignment, structural comparison, and molecular docking, was utilized to identify a SARS-CoV-2-spike(S)-specific segment. A tiling crRNA library targeting this specific RNA segment was designed, and optimal crRNA candidates were selected using in-silico methods. The efficiencies of the crRNA candidates were tested in human HepG2 and AT2 cells. Results: The most effective crRNA sequence inducing a robust cleavage effect on S and a potent collateral cleavage effect were identified. Conclusions: This study provides a rapid design pipeline for a CRISPR-Cas13a-based antiviral tool against SARS-CoV-2. Moreover, it offers a novel approach for anti-virus study even if the precise structures of viral proteins are indeterminate.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , RNA, Guide/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , COVID-19/virology , CRISPR-Cas Systems/genetics , Computational Biology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Genetic Vectors/administration & dosage , Genetic Vectors/genetics , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
14.
SLAS Discov ; 26(3): 336-344, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934236

ABSTRACT

The reuse of preexisting small molecules for a novel emerging disease threat is a rapid measure to discover unknown applications for previously validated therapies. A pertinent and recent example where such a strategy could be employed is in the fight against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Therapies designed or discovered to target viral proteins also have off-target effects on the host proteome when employed in a complex physiological environment. This study aims to assess these host cell targets for a panel of FDA-approved antiviral compounds including remdesivir, using the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) coupled with mass spectrometry (CETSA MS) in noninfected cells. CETSA MS is a powerful method to delineate direct and indirect interactions between small molecules and protein targets in intact cells. Biologically active compounds can induce changes in thermal stability, in their primary binding partners, and in proteins that in turn interact with the direct targets. Such engagement of host targets by antiviral drugs may contribute to the clinical effect against the virus but can also constitute a liability. We present here a comparative study of CETSA molecular target engagement fingerprints of antiviral drugs to better understand the link between off-targets and efficacy.


Subject(s)
ATPases Associated with Diverse Cellular Activities/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Adenosine/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Furans/pharmacology , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Mass Spectrometry , Proteomics/methods , Pyrroles/pharmacology , Triazines/pharmacology , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration
15.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 132: 110816, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-856479

ABSTRACT

After the first case of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was reported in Wuhan, COVID-19 has rapidly spread to almost all parts of world. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor can bind to spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. Then, the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 can be cleaved and activated by transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) of the host cells for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Therefore, ACE2 and TMPRSS2 are potential antiviral targets for treatment of prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this study, we discovered that 10-250 µg/mL of GB-2, from Tian Shang Sheng Mu of Chiayi Puzi Peitian Temple, can inhibit ACE2 mRNA expression and ACE2 and TMPRSS2 protein expression in HepG2 and 293 T cells without cytotoxicity. GB-2 treatment could decrease ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression level of lung tissue and kidney tissue without adverse effects, including nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, in animal model. In the compositions of GB-2, we discovered that 50 µg/mL of theaflavin could inhibit protein expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2. Theaflavin could inhibit the mRNA expression of ACE2. In conclusion, our results suggest that GB-2 and theaflavin could act as potential compounds for ACE2 and TMPRSS2 inhibitors in the further clinical study.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/isolation & purification , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/isolation & purification , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Gene Expression/drug effects , HEK293 Cells , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Protease Inhibitors/isolation & purification , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics
16.
mBio ; 11(5)2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-772275

ABSTRACT

Membrane-associated RING-CH-type 8 (MARCH8) strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) incorporation into virions by downregulating its cell surface expression, but the mechanism is still unclear. We now report that MARCH8 also blocks the Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) incorporation via surface downregulation. To understand how these viral fusion proteins are downregulated, we investigated the effects of MARCH8 on EBOV GP maturation and externalization via the conventional secretion pathway. MARCH8 interacted with EBOV GP and furin when detected by immunoprecipitation and retained the GP/furin complex in the Golgi when their location was tracked by a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. MARCH8 did not reduce the GP expression or affect the GP modification by high-mannose N-glycans in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it inhibited the formation of complex N-glycans on the GP in the Golgi. Additionally, the GP O-glycosylation and furin-mediated proteolytic cleavage were also inhibited. Moreover, we identified a novel furin cleavage site on EBOV GP and found that only those fully glycosylated GPs were processed by furin and incorporated into virions. Furthermore, the GP shedding and secretion were all blocked by MARCH8. MARCH8 also blocked the furin-mediated cleavage of HIV-1 Env (gp160) and the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA). We conclude that MARCH8 has a very broad antiviral activity by prohibiting different viral fusion proteins from glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage in the Golgi, which inhibits their transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane and incorporation into virions.IMPORTANCE Enveloped viruses express three classes of fusion proteins that are required for their entry into host cells via mediating virus and cell membrane fusion. Class I fusion proteins are produced from influenza viruses, retroviruses, Ebola viruses, and coronaviruses. They are first synthesized as a type I transmembrane polypeptide precursor that is subsequently glycosylated and oligomerized. Most of these precursors are cleaved en route to the plasma membrane by a cellular protease furin in the late secretory pathway, generating the trimeric N-terminal receptor-binding and C-terminal fusion subunits. Here, we show that a cellular protein, MARCH8, specifically inhibits the furin-mediated cleavage of EBOV GP, HIV-1 Env, and H5N1 HA. Further analyses uncovered that MARCH8 blocked the EBOV GP glycosylation in the Golgi and inhibited its transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Thus, MARCH8 has a very broad antiviral activity by specifically inactivating different viral fusion proteins.


Subject(s)
Ebolavirus/chemistry , Glycoproteins/antagonists & inhibitors , HIV-1/chemistry , Hemagglutinins, Viral/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/chemistry , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Envelope Proteins/physiology , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Ebolavirus/physiology , Glycosylation , HEK293 Cells , HIV-1/physiology , HeLa Cells , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype/physiology , Protein Binding , THP-1 Cells , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism , Vero Cells , Viral Fusion Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Viral Fusion Proteins/metabolism
17.
Redox Biol ; 36: 101682, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704017

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need to identify antivirals against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in the current COVID-19 pandemic and to contain future similar emergencies early on. Specific side-chain cholesterol oxidation products of the oxysterols family have been shown to inhibit a large variety of both enveloped and non-enveloped human viral pathogens. Here we report on the in vitro inhibitory activity of the redox active oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol against SARS-CoV-2 and against one of the common cold agents HCoV-OC43 human coronavirus without significant cytotoxicity. Interestingly, physiological serum levels of 27-hydroxycholesterol in SARS-CoV-2 positive subjects were significantly decreased compared to the matched control group, reaching a marked 50% reduction in severe COVID-19 cases. Moreover, no correlation at all was observed between 24-hydroxycholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol serum levels and the severity of the disease. Opposite to that of 27-hydroxycholesterol was the behaviour of two recognized markers of redox imbalance, i.e. 7-ketocholesterol and 7ß-hydroxycholesterol, whose serum levels were significantly increased especially in severe COVID-19. The exogenous administration of 27-hydroxycholesterol may represent in the near future a valid antiviral strategy in the worsening of diseases caused by present and emerging coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Hydroxycholesterols/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Aged , Animals , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Hep G2 Cells , Humans , Hydroxycholesterols/pharmacology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vero Cells
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