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1.
Viruses ; 14(1)2022 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631201

ABSTRACT

γδ T cells are innate cells able to quickly eliminate pathogens or infected/tumoral cells by their antiviral and adjuvancy activities. The role of γδ T cells during Dengue Viral Infection (DENV) infection is not fully elucidated. Nevertheless, human primary γδ T cells have been shown to kill in vitro DENV-infected cells, thus highlighting their possible antiviral function. The aim of this work was to characterize the phenotype and function of Vδ2 T cells in DENV patients. Fifteen DENV patients were enrolled for this study and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were used to analyze Vδ2-T-cell frequency, differentiation profile, activation/exhaustion status, and functionality by multiparametric flow cytometry. Our data demonstrated that DENV infection was able to significantly reduce Vδ2-T-cell frequency and to increase their activation (CD38 and HLA-DR) and exhaustion markers (PD-1 and TIM-3). Furthermore, Vδ2 T cells showed a reduced capability to produce IFN-γ after phosphoantigenic stimulation that can be associated to TIM-3 expression. Several studies are needed to depict the possible clinical impact of γδ-T-cell impairment on disease severity and to define the antiviral and immunoregulatory activities of γδ T cells in the first phases of infection.


Subject(s)
Dengue/immunology , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Intraepithelial Lymphocytes/immunology , Adaptation, Physiological , Adult , Flow Cytometry , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology
2.
J Exp Med ; 219(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594167

ABSTRACT

In rare instances, pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection results in a novel immunodysregulation syndrome termed multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). We compared MIS-C immunopathology with severe COVID-19 in adults. MIS-C does not result in pneumocyte damage but is associated with vascular endotheliitis and gastrointestinal epithelial injury. In MIS-C, the cytokine release syndrome is characterized by IFNγ and not type I interferon. Persistence of patrolling monocytes differentiates MIS-C from severe COVID-19, which is dominated by HLA-DRlo classical monocytes. IFNγ levels correlate with granzyme B production in CD16+ NK cells and TIM3 expression on CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells. Single-cell TCR profiling reveals a skewed TCRß repertoire enriched for TRBV11-2 and a superantigenic signature in TIM3+/CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells. Using NicheNet, we confirm IFNγ as a central cytokine in the communication between TIM3+/CD38+/HLA-DR+ T cells, CD16+ NK cells, and patrolling monocytes. Normalization of IFNγ, loss of TIM3, quiescence of CD16+ NK cells, and contraction of patrolling monocytes upon clinical resolution highlight their potential role in MIS-C immunopathogenesis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Receptors, IgG/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Adolescent , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Blood Vessels/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Cell Proliferation , Child , Cohort Studies , Complement Activation , Cytokines/metabolism , Enterocytes/pathology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Inflammation/pathology , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interleukin-15/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Superantigens/metabolism , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology
3.
mBio ; 12(5): e0159921, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398577

ABSTRACT

Cellular immunity may be involved in organ damage and rehabilitation in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to delineate immunological features of COVID-19 patients with pulmonary sequelae (PS) 1 year after discharge. Fifty COVID-19 survivors were recruited and classified according to radiological characteristics, including 24 patients with PS and 26 patients without PS. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of immune cells were evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry. Patients with PS had an increased proportion of natural killer (NK) cells and a lower percentage of B cells than patients without PS. Phenotypic and functional features of T cells in patients with PS were predominated by the accumulation of CD4-positive (CD4+) T cells secreting interleukin 17A (IL-17A), short-lived effector-like CD8+ T cells (CD27-negative [CD27-] CD62L-), and senescent T cells with excessive secretion of granzyme B/perforin/interferon gamma (IFN-γ). NK cells were characterized by the excessive secretion of granzyme B and perforin and the downregulation of NKP30 and NKP46; highly activated NKT and γδ T cells exhibited NKP30 and TIM-3 upregulation and NKB1 downregulation in patients with PS. However, immunosuppressive cells were comparable between the two groups. The interrelationship of immune cells in COVID-19 was intrinsically identified, whereby T cells secreting IL-2, IL-4, and IL-17A were enriched among CD28+ and CD57- cells and cells secreting perforin/granzyme B/IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-expressed markers of terminal differentiation. CD57+ NK cells, CD4+Perforin+ T cells, and CD8+ CD27+ CD62L+ T cells were identified as the independent predictors for residual lesions. Overall, our findings unveil the profound imbalance of immune landscape that may correlate with organ damage and rehabilitation in COVID-19. IMPORTANCE A considerable proportion of COVID-19 survivors have residual lung lesions such as ground-glass opacity and fiber streak shadow. To determine the relationship between host immunity and residual lung lesions, we performed an extensive analysis of immune responses in convalescent patients with COVID-19 1 year after discharge. We found significant differences in immunological characteristics between patients with pulmonary sequelae and patients without pulmonary sequelae 1 year after discharge. Our study highlights the profound imbalance of immune landscape in the COVID-19 patients with pulmonary sequelae, characterized by the robust activation of cytotoxic T cells, NK cells, and γδ T cells, as well as the deficiencies of immunosuppressive cells. Importantly, CD57+ NK cells, CD4+Perforin+ T cells, and CD8+ CD27+ CD62L+ T cells were identified as the independent predictors for residual lesions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Adult , CD28 Antigens/metabolism , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , CD57 Antigens/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Female , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/immunology , Immunity, Cellular/physiology , Interleukin-17/metabolism , Interleukin-2/metabolism , Interleukin-4/metabolism , L-Selectin/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 1/metabolism , Natural Cytotoxicity Triggering Receptor 3/metabolism
4.
Biomolecules ; 11(8)2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360720

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has completely disrupted the health systems of the entire planet. From the earliest months, it became increasingly clear that in addition to affecting the upper airways and lungs, there were other organs that could be affected. Among these, the skin became a real "sentinel signal" to be able to even suspect COVID-19. Background: this study deals with a little-explored issue for now: the study of skin immunopathology in SARS-CoV-2 positive subjects ascertained using the most reliable methods available. Methods: we used skin biopsy samples from SARS-CoV-2 positive and negative patients, studying morphology (Hematoxylin-Eosin), T lymphocyte population (CD4 and CD8), three markers such as HMGB-1, TIM-3 and HO-1 by immunohistochemistry. Results: although the presence of the CD4 and CD8 T population did not differ statistically significantly, we found greater activation and release of HMGB-1 in skin samples from SARS-CoV-2 positive patients, greater immunolabeling for TIM-3 at the level of CD4 and CD8 and a reduced expression of Heme oxygenase 1. Conclusions: these results support the possibility that there is immune deregulation in SARS-CoV-2 positive patients who develop skin manifestations of various kinds.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Heme Oxygenase (Decyclizing)/metabolism , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Skin Diseases/metabolism , Skin/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Skin/pathology , Skin Diseases/etiology , Skin Diseases/pathology , T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
5.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1870, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-776203

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) which is caused by the novel SARS-CoV-2 virus is a severe flu-like illness which is associated with hyperinflammation and immune dysfunction. The virus induces a strong T and B cell response but little is known about the immune pathology of this viral infection. Acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria also causes acute clinical illness and is characterized by hyperinflammation due to the strong production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a massive activation of T cells. In malaria, T cells express a variety of co-inhibitory receptors which might be a consequence of their activation but also might limit their overwhelming function. Thus, T cells are implicated in protection as well as in pathology. The outcome of malaria is thought to be a consequence of the balance between co-activation and co-inhibition of T cells. Following the hypothesis that T cells in COVID-19 might have a similar, dual function, we comprehensively characterized the differentiation (CCR7, CD45RO) and activation status (HLA-DR, CD38, CD69, CD226), the co-expression of co-inhibitory molecules (PD1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, TIGIT), as well as the expression pattern of the transcription factors T-bet and eomes of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells of PBMC of n = 20 SARS-CoV-2 patients compared to n = 10 P. falciparum infected patients and n = 13 healthy controls. Overall, acute COVID-19 and malaria infection resulted in a comparably elevated activation and altered differentiation status of the CD8+ and CD4+ T cell populations. T effector cells of COVID-19 and malaria patients showed higher frequencies of the inhibitory receptors T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) and Lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3) which was linked to increased activation levels and an upregulation of the transcription factors T-bet and eomes. COVID-19 patients with a more severe disease course showed higher levels of LAG-3 and TIM-3 than patients with a mild disease course. During recovery, a rapid normalization of these inhibitory receptors could be observed. In summary, comparing the expression of different co-inhibitory molecules in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in COVID-19 vs. malaria, there is a transient increase of the expression of certain inhibitory receptors like LAG-3 and TIM-3 in COVID-19 in the overall context of acute immune activation.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/genetics , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 2/metabolism , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Malaria, Falciparum/immunology , Plasmodium falciparum/isolation & purification , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/metabolism , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Cells, Cultured , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Malaria, Falciparum/parasitology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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