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1.
Trop Doct ; 52(1): 171-173, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745564

ABSTRACT

Hepatitis B virus infection is a global problem and causes several liver diseases including acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Though uncommon, some immune mediated extra-hepatic manifestations may develop during the infection. Exudative ascites during HBV infection is one such.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Hepatitis B, Chronic , Hepatitis B , Liver Neoplasms , Ascites/complications , Ascites/etiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/diagnosis , Hepatitis B virus , Hepatitis B, Chronic/complications , Hepatitis B, Chronic/diagnosis , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis
2.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(1)2022 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606405

ABSTRACT

Viral myositis is commonly seen with influenza and COVID-19 infections. While it has been described with acute viral hepatitis, concomitant involvement of the peripheral nerves causing a neuromyopathy has not been reported. A 67-year-old man with acute hepatitis B infection developed a severe myalgia and lower limb weakness around 1 month into his illness. Investigations revealed a neuromyopathy and rhabdomyolysis. MRI whole body with short tau inversion recovery sequences showed scattered muscle hyperintensities in the upper and lower limbs. He was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and improved. This is the first report of an acute neuromyopathy associated with acute hepatitis B viral infection and demonstration of muscle MRI abnormalities in this condition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepatitis B , Myositis , Neuromuscular Diseases , Aged , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/drug therapy , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
3.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0244947, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301950

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is a phase of HBV infection characterised by the presence of HBV DNA in the absence of detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). OBI is of concern in the HIV-infected due to high prevalence and risk of HBV reactivation. The prevalence and clinico-demographic characteristics of OBI in anti-retroviral therapy (ART) naïve HIV infected adults in Kenya is unknown. METHODS: A cross sectional study carried was out at three sites in Kenya. HIV infected ART naïve adults were enrolled and demographic data collected. Blood samples were assayed for HBsAg, HBV DNA, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) and hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). Data on CD4 count, HIV viral load and platelet count were obtained from medical records. RESULTS: Of 208 patients, 199 (95.7%) did not report HBV vaccination, 196 (94.2%) were HBsAg negative, 119 (57.2%) had no HBV markers, 58 (27.9%) had previous HBV infection (anti-HBc positive) and 11 (5.3%) had OBI. All 11 (100%) OBI patients were anti-HBc positive. OBI patients comprised 19.0% of HBsAg negative, anti-HBc positive patients. There was no difference in clinico-demographic characteristics between the overt HBV, OBI and HBV negative patients. CONCLUSION: This was the first study on OBI in ART naïve HIV infected adults in Kenya. The lower OBI prevalence compared to other sub-Saharan African countries could be attributed to lower HBV exposure. Most patients were HBV unexposed and unimmunized, outlining the need to implement guideline recommended immunization strategies.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Adult , Coinfection/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/virology , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis B/virology , Hepatitis B Surface Antigens/blood , Humans , Kenya/epidemiology , Male , Prevalence
5.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 22(4): 425-442, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188209

ABSTRACT

The emergence of data from clinical trials of biologics, the approval of new biologics, and our improved understanding of psoriasis pathogenesis have increased the therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Biologics currently approved for the treatment of psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, interleukin (IL)-17 inhibitors, ustekinumab (an IL-12/23 inhibitor), and IL-23 inhibitors. Data from clinical trials and studies of the safety and efficacy of biologics provide essential information for the personalization of patient care. We discuss the benefits and disadvantages of biologics as a first-line treatment choice, update treatment recommendations according to current evidence, and propose psoriasis treatment algorithms. Our discussion includes the following comorbid conditions: psoriatic arthritis, multiple sclerosis, congestive heart failure, inflammatory bowel disease, hepatitis B, nonmelanoma skin cancer, lymphoma, and latent tuberculosis. We make evidence-based treatment recommendations for special populations, including pediatric patients, patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), and pregnant and breastfeeding patients with psoriasis. Ultimately, individualized recommendations that consider patient preferences, disease severity, comorbid conditions, and additional risk factors should be offered to patients and updated as new trial data emerges.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Biological Products/therapeutic use , Psoriasis/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Heart Failure/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/complications , Latent Tuberculosis/complications , Lymphoma/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Skin Neoplasms/complications
6.
Asian J Androl ; 23(4): 335-347, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039129

ABSTRACT

Viral infections have haunted humankind since times immemorial. Overpopulation, globalization, and extensive deforestation have created an ideal environment for a viral spread with unknown and multiple shedding routes. Many viruses can infect the male reproductive tract, with potential adverse consequences to male reproductive health, including infertility and cancer. Moreover, some genital tract viral infections can be sexually transmitted, potentially impacting the resulting offspring's health. We have summarized the evidence concerning the presence and adverse effects of the relevant viruses on the reproductive tract (mumps virus, human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus, human papillomavirus, hepatitis B and C viruses, Ebola virus, Zika virus, influenza virus, and coronaviruses), their routes of infection, target organs and cells, prevalence and pattern of virus shedding in semen, as well as diagnosis/testing and treatment strategies. The pathophysiological understanding in the male genital tract is essential to assess its clinical impact on male reproductive health and guide future research.


Subject(s)
Reproductive Health/trends , Virus Diseases/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/physiopathology , Hepatitis C/complications , Hepatitis C/physiopathology , Herpes Genitalis/complications , Herpes Genitalis/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Papillomavirus Infections/physiopathology , Virus Diseases/physiopathology , Zika Virus Infection/complications , Zika Virus Infection/physiopathology
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(1)2020 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027278

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases represent a relevant issue in lung cancer patients. Bacterial and viral infections might influence the patients' prognosis, both directly affecting the immune system and indirectly impairing the outcome of anticancer treatments, mainly immunotherapy. In this analysis, we aimed to review the current evidence in order to clarify the complex correlation between infections and lung cancer. In detail, we mainly explored the potential impact on immunotherapy outcome/safety of (1) bacterial infections, with a detailed focus on antibiotics; and (2) viral infections, discriminating among (a) human immune-deficiency virus (HIV), (b) hepatitis B/C virus (HBV-HCV), and (c) Sars-Cov-2. A series of studies suggested the prognostic impact of antibiotic therapy administration, timing, and exposure ratio in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors, probably through an antibiotic-related microbiota dysbiosis. Although cancer patients with HIV, HBV, and HCV were usually excluded from clinical trials evaluating immunotherapy, some retrospective and prospective trials performed in these patient subgroups reported similar results compared to those described in not-infected patients, with a favorable safety profile. Moreover, patients with thoracic cancers are particularly at risk of COVID-19 severe outcomes and mortality. Few reports speculated about the prognostic implications of anticancer therapy, including immunotherapy, in lung cancer patients with concomitant Sars-Cov-2 infection, showing, to date, inconsistent results. The correlation between infectious diseases and immunotherapy remains to be further explored and clarified in the context of dedicated trials. In clinical practice, the accurate and prompt multidisciplinary management of lung cancer patients with infections should be encouraged in order to select the best treatment options for these patients, avoiding unexpected toxicities, while maintaining the anticancer effect.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Immunotherapy , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/complications , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/complications , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/immunology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/pathology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/pathology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/microbiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/virology , HIV/drug effects , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/immunology , Hepatitis B/pathology , Hepatitis C/complications , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Hepatitis C/pathology , Humans , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Lung Neoplasms/microbiology , Lung Neoplasms/virology , Microbiota/drug effects , Microbiota/immunology
8.
J Hepatol ; 74(6): 1295-1302, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The evolution and clinical significance of abnormal liver chemistries and the impact of hepatitis B infection on outcome in patients with COVID-19 is not well characterized. This study aimed to explore these issues. METHODS: This large retrospective cohort study included 2,073 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and definite outcomes in Wuhan, China. Longitudinal liver function tests were conducted, with associated factors and risk of death determined by multivariate regression analyses. A prognostic nomogram was formulated to predict the survival of patients with COVID-19. The characteristics of liver abnormalities and outcomes of patients with COVID-19, with and without hepatitis B, were compared after 1:3 propensity score matching. RESULTS: Of the 2,073 patients, 1,282 (61.8%) had abnormal liver chemistries during hospitalization, and 297 (14.3%) had a liver injury. The mean levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and direct bilirubin (D-Bil) increased early after symptom onset in deceased patients and showed disparity compared to levels in discharged patients throughout the clinical course of the disease. Abnormal AST (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.39; 95% CI 1.04-1.86, p = 0.027) and D-Bil (adjusted HR 1.66; 95% CI 1.22-2.26; p = 0.001) levels at admission were independent risk factors for mortality due to COVID-19. A nomogram was established based on the results of multivariate analysis and showed sufficient discriminatory power and good consistency between the prediction and the observation. HBV infection in patients did not increase the risk of poor COVID-19-associated outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal AST and D-Bil levels at admission were independent predictors of COVID-19-related mortality. Therefore, monitoring liver chemistries, especially AST and D-Bil levels, is necessary in hospitalized patients with COVID-19. LAY SUMMARY: Liver test abnormalities (in particular elevations in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and direct bilirubin [D-Bil]) were observed after symptom onset in patients who went on to die of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Abnormal levels of AST and D-Bil at admission were independent predictors of COVID-19-related mortality. HBV infection in patients did not increase the risk of poor COVID-19-associated outcomes.


Subject(s)
Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Bilirubin/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Liver Diseases/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Female , Hepatitis B/complications , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Viral Hepat ; 28(1): 80-88, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-979832

ABSTRACT

The interaction between existing chronic liver diseases caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and COVID-19 has not been studied. We analysed 70 COVID-19 cases combined with HBV infection (CHI) to determine the epidemiological, clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome. We investigated clinical presentation, imaging and laboratory parameters of COVID-19 patients of seven hospitals from Jan 20 to March 20, 2020. Multivariate analysis was used to analyse risk factors for progression of patients with COVID-19 combined with HBV infection. Compared with COVID-19 without HBV infection (WHI) group, patients with dual infection had a higher proportion of severe/critically ill disease (32.86% vs. 15.27%, P = .000), higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and activated partial thromboplastin (APTT) [50(28-69)vs 21(14-30), P = .000; 40(25-54) vs 23(18-30), P = .000; 34.0(27.2-38.7) vs 37.2(31.1-41.4), P = .031]. The utilization rates of Arbidol and immunoglobulin were significantly higher than those in the co-infected group [48.57% vs. 35.64%, P < .05; 21.43% vs. 8.18%, P < .001], while the utilization rate of chloroquine phosphate was lower (1.43% vs 14.00%, P < .05) in the co-infected patients group. Age and c-reactive protein (CRP) level were independent risk factors for recovery of patients with COVID-19 combined with HBV infection. The original characteristics of COVID-19 cases combined with HBV infection were higher rate of liver injury, coagulation disorders, severe/critical tendency and increased susceptibility. The elderly and patients with higher level of CRP were more likely to experience a severe outcome of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis B/pathology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Coinfection/complications , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/pathology , Coinfection/therapy , Female , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/therapy , Hepatitis B virus , Humans , Liver/injuries , Liver/pathology , Liver/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
J Viral Hepat ; 28(1): 89-94, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793304

ABSTRACT

A significant proportion of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop severe respiratory symptoms due to an excessive immune response. Treatment of this condition may include immunosuppressive therapies, such as IL-6 receptor antagonists and corticosteroids, which pose a risk for patients with active or past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this prospective cohort study, we analysed the risk of HBV reactivation in patients with severe COVID-19 and resolved HBV infection undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. From 15th March to 30th April 2020, 600 patients with severe COVID-19 were admitted to our hospital and treated with immune modulators. Data regarding HBV infection were available in 484, of whom 69 (14%) were HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive. For these patients, HBV reactivation prophylaxis with entecavir was strongly recommended. Complete follow-up was available in 61 patients: 72% were male, median age was 67 years, and anti-HBs was >10 IU/mL in 72%. The immunosuppressive drug most used was tocilizumab (72%). Despite HBV prophylaxis recommendation, 38 (62%) patients received entecavir and 23 (38%) did not. Baseline features of both groups were similar. At follow-up, we found no cases of HBsAg seroreversion and only 2 (3%) patients (no prophylaxis group) had detectable serum HBV-DNA (<15 IU/mL). Both were anti-HBs negative and had normal aminotransferase levels. Our data show that the risk of HBV reactivation in patients with severe COVID-19 and resolved HBV infection undergoing immunosuppressive treatment is low. However, if a systematic follow-up after hospital discharge is unfeasible in patients without anti-HBs, a short course of antiviral prophylaxis may be a safe option.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hepatitis B/virology , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Virus Activation/drug effects , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , DNA, Viral/blood , Female , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/prevention & control , Hepatitis B Antibodies/blood , Hepatitis B Core Antigens/immunology , Hepatitis B Surface Antigens/blood , Hepatitis B virus/immunology , Hepatitis B virus/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 110284, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779456

ABSTRACT

In the context of the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, patients affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should be more vulnerable to Covid-19, whereas they seem to be protected against severe Covid-19. That paradox has important practical implications for the use of the drug Tocilizumab in Covid-19. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) orchestrates the so-called cytokine storm leading to the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), the life-threatening condition that is responsible for Covid-19 deaths. However, IL-6 has a paradoxical effect in many viral infections. For pathogens such as HIV and Hepatitis B for example, high elevations show a toxic effect and are associated with higher mortality (e.g. they promote progression to AIDS in HIV patients), whereas mild elevations show a protective effect. IL-6 can be therefore considered as being both a pro-inflammatory and an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Several studies have shown that severe COPD is associated with extremely-high levels of IL-6, whereas mild COPD is associated with mild elevations of IL-6. It is plausible that the chronic, mildly-elevated concentrations of IL-6 found in mild COPD patients is protective against the deterioration of Covid-19, as it is the case for other viral diseases. That may explain why COPD is surprisingly an uncommon comorbidity in Covid-19 intensive care units. This may have an important practical implication for the treatment of Covid-19 patients: our hypothesis is that Tocilizumab must be used exclusively in patients with an ongoing cytokine storm. Otherwise, an early use of Tocilizumab can be harmful, especially in patients affected by COPD or other conditions with mildly-elevated IL-6.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/drug therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/immunology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cytokines/metabolism , HIV Infections/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Humans , Inflammation , Models, Theoretical , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Treatment Outcome
12.
Liver Int ; 40(11): 2655-2659, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-654155

ABSTRACT

Liver impairment is frequent in patients with novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and direct viral tropism for the liver has been proven. Since several of the currently administered drugs against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are possibly hepatotoxic, the management of patients with COVID-19 and liver failure is still an almost unexplored field. Taking this challenging case of acute HBV with persistent hyperbilirubinemia and SARS-COV-2 infection with respiratory distress as a starting point, we here loop through this condition. Where the available therapeutic options are scarce, we here propose hemoperfusion (HP) as an attractive alternative to both delay any late-stage progression of hyper inflammation process in COVID-19 and remove the toxins involved in acute liver failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Registries , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Hepatitis B/blood , Hepatitis B/therapy , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
J Immunother Cancer ; 8(2)2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-626611

ABSTRACT

The present review summarizes up-to-date evidence addressing the frequently discussed clinical controversies regarding the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in cancer patients with viral infections, including AIDS, hepatitis B and C, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, influenza, and COVID-19. In detail, we provide available information on (1) safety regarding the risk of new infections, (2) effects on the outcome of pre-existing infections, (3) whether immunosuppressive drugs used to treat ICI-related adverse events affect the risk of infection or virulence of pre-existing infections, (4) whether the use of vaccines in ICI-treated patients is considered safe, and (5) whether there are beneficial effects of ICIs that even qualify them as a therapeutic approach for these viral infections.


Subject(s)
Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Neoplasms/complications , Virus Diseases/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/drug therapy , Hepatitis B/immunology , Hepatitis B/therapy , Hepatitis C/complications , Hepatitis C/drug therapy , Hepatitis C/immunology , Hepatitis C/therapy , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/complications , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology
14.
Am J Transplant ; 20(7): 1916-1921, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-210165

ABSTRACT

Over 1 000 000 cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been confirmed since the worldwide outbreak began. Not enough data on infected solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are available, especially data about the management of immunosuppressants. We report two cases of COVID-19 in two transplant recipients, with different treatments and prognoses. The first patient received liver transplantation due to hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma and was confirmed to have COVID-19 9 days later. Following a treatment regimen consisting of discontinued immunosuppressant use and low-dose methylprednisolone-based therapy, the patient developed acute rejection but eventually recovered. The other patient had undergone a renal transplant from a living-related donor 17 years ago, and was admitted to the hospital because of persistent fever. This patient was also diagnosed with COVID-19. His treatment regimen consisted of reduced immunosuppressant use. No signs of rejection were observed during the regimen. In the end, the patient successfully recovered from COVID-19. These effectively treated cases can provide a basis for immunosuppressant management of COVID-19-positive SOT recipients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Organ Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Transplant Recipients , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/surgery , Hepatitis B/complications , Hepatitis B/surgery , Hepatitis B virus , Humans , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/surgery , Kidney Transplantation , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Liver Transplantation , Male , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
15.
Am J Transplant ; 20(7): 1907-1910, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47494

ABSTRACT

Liver injury is common in patients with COVID-19, but little is known about its clinical presentation and severity in the context of liver transplant. We describe a case of COVID-19 in a patient who underwent transplant 3 years ago for hepatocellular carcinoma. The patient came to clinic with symptoms of respiratory disease; pharyngeal swabs for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 were positive. His disease progressed rapidly from mild to critical illness and was complicated by several nosocomial infections and multiorgan failure. Despite multiple invasive procedures and rescue therapies, he died from the disease. The management of COVID-19 in the posttransplant setting presents complex challenges, emphasizing the importance of strict prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/complications , Coronavirus Infections/complications , End Stage Liver Disease/complications , Hepatitis B/complications , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cross Infection/complications , End Stage Liver Disease/surgery , Fatal Outcome , Hepatitis B/surgery , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Liver Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Postoperative Complications , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome
16.
Am J Transplant ; 20(7): 1891-1895, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-30787

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic spreads rapidly and may be an increasing challenge for transplant community. Clinical data on COVID-19 infection in transplant population is very limited. Herein we presented the clinical course and outcome of a 50-year-old male post liver transplantation who contracted COVID-19, with subsequent infection of his wife. The process of illness was representative. A therapeutic regime with temporary immunosuppression withdrawal and systemic low-dose corticosteroid as principle was involved in the management of the patient which made him recover from severe COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , End Stage Liver Disease/complications , End Stage Liver Disease/surgery , Hepatitis B/complications , Liver Transplantation , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Hepatitis B/surgery , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome
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