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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 881412, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1952830

ABSTRACT

Backgrounds: Hepcidin has been identified as a systemic iron-regulatory hormone. Recent studies have suggested that iron metabolism disorders may be involved in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Objectives: To re-evaluate the hepcidin-related iron metabolism parameters and explore the relationship between hepcidin-mediated iron dysmetabolism and COVID-19 severity. Methods: COVID-19 is classified as mild and moderate as non-severe, severe and critical as severe. A meta-analysis was conducted. Four bibliographic databases were comprehensively searched up to December 31st 2021. Results: Six unique studies with data from 477 COVID-19 patients were included. Compared to non-severe cases, severe cases had higher hepcidin (standardized mean difference (SMD), -0.39; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [-0.76, -0.03]; P = 0.03) and ferritin (SMD, -0.84; 95% CI [-1.30, -0.38]; P = 0.0004). In five out of six studies, a total of 427 patients were tested for serum iron, and there were significant differences in their levels between severe and non-severe cases (SMD, 0.22; 95% CI [0.02, 0.41]; P = 0.03). A total of 320 patients from four out of six studies were tested for transferrin saturation, and the statistical difference was not significant (SMD, 0.06; 95% CI [-0.17, 0.28]; P = 0.64). Conclusion: Severe COVID-19 cases had higher serum levels of hepcidin and ferritin, and lower serum iron, without significant differences in transferrin saturation. Further studies are needed to verify whether targeting the hepcidin-mediated iron metabolism axis may influence the outcome and treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepcidins , Ferritins , Hepcidins/metabolism , Humans , Iron , Transferrin/analysis , Transferrin/metabolism
2.
APMIS ; 130(9): 590-596, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909331

ABSTRACT

Ferritin, the central iron storage protein, has attracted attention as a biomarker of severe COVID-19. Few studies have investigated regulators of iron metabolism in the context of COVID-19. The aim was to evaluate biomarkers for iron metabolism in the acute phase response to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by SARS-CoV-2 compared with CAP caused by bacteria or influenza virus in hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study of 164 patients from the Surviving Pneumonia Cohort recruited between January 8, 2019 and May 26, 2020. Blood samples were collected at admission and analyzed for levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, erythroferrone, and hepcidin. Median (IQR) hepcidin was higher in SARS-CoV-2 with 143.8 (100.7-180.7) ng/mL compared with bacterial and influenza infection with 78.8 (40.1-125.4) and 53.5 (25.2-125.8) ng/mL, respectively. The median ferritin level was more than 2-fold higher in patients with SARS-CoV-2 compared with the other etiologies (p < 0.001). Patients with SARS-CoV-2 had lower levels of erythroferrone and CRP compared with those infected with bacteria. Higher levels of hepcidin and lower levels of erythroferrone despite lower CRP levels among patients with SARS-CoV-2 compared with those infected with bacteria indicate alterations in iron metabolism in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Community-Acquired Infections , Influenza, Human , Pneumonia, Bacterial , Pneumonia, Viral , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Community-Acquired Infections/blood , Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ferritins , Hepcidins/metabolism , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Iron/metabolism , Pneumonia, Bacterial/blood , Pneumonia, Bacterial/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Acta Biomed ; 93(2): e2022057, 2022 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1848015

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Dysregulation of iron metabolism and hyper-inflammation are two key points in the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Since high hepcidin levels and low serum iron can predict COVID-19 severity and mortality, we decided to investigate iron metabolism and inflammatory response in 32 COVID-19 adult patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 defined by a positive result of RT-PCR nasopharyngeal swab, and admitted to an Italian emergency department for acute respiratory failure at different degree. METHODS: Patients were stratified in 3 groups based on PaO2/FiO2 ratio at admission: 13 (41%) were normoxemic at rest and suffered from exertional dyspnea (group 1); 14 (44%) had a mild respiratory failure (group 2), and 5 (15%) a severe hypoxiemia (group 3). RESULTS: White blood cells were significantly higher in group 3, while lymphocytes and hemoglobin were significantly reduced. Serum iron, transferrin saturation, non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI) and ferritin were significantly increased in group 2. All the groups showed high hepcidin levels, but in group 3 this parameter was significantly altered. It is noteworthy that in group 1 inflammatory and oxidative indices were both within the normal range. CONCLUSIONS: We are aware that our study has some limitations, the small number of enrolled patients and the short period of data collection, but few works have been performed in the Emergency Room. However, we strongly believe that our results confirm the pivotal role of both iron metabolism dysregulation and hyper-inflammatory response in the pathogenesis of tissue and organ damage in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hepcidins/metabolism , Homeostasis , Humans , Iron/metabolism , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Investig Med ; 70(4): 934-938, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745675

ABSTRACT

Iron metabolism is tightly linked to infectious and inflammatory signals through hepcidin synthesis. To date, iron homeostasis during SARS-CoV-2 infection has not yet been described. The aim of this study is to characterize the hepcidin and erythroid regulators (growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) and erythroferrone (ERFE)) by measuring concentrations in plasma in context of COVID-19 disease.We performed a single-center observational study of patients with COVID-19 to evaluate concentrations of main regulatory proteins involved in iron homeostasis, namely: hepcidin, ERFE and GDF-15. SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19+) was defined by a positive RT-PCR. Sixteen patients with COVID-19+ were gender-matched and age-matched to 16 patients with a sepsis unrelated to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19-) and were compared with non-parametric statistic test.Clinical and hematological parameters, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor and C reactive protein were not statistically different between both groups. Median plasma hepcidin concentrations were higher in the COVID-19+ group (44.1 (IQR 16.55-70.48) vs 14.2 (IQR 5.95-18.98) nmol/L, p=0.003), while median ERFE and GDF-15 concentrations were lower in the COVID-19+ group (0.16 (IQR 0.01-0.73) vs 0.89 (IQR 0.19-3.82) ng/mL, p=0.035; 2003 (IQR 1355-2447) vs 4713 (IQR 2082-7774) pg/mL, p=0015), respectively) compared with the COVID-19- group.This is the first study reporting lower ERFE and GDF-15 median concentrations in patients with COVID-19+ compared with patients with COVID-19-, associated with an increased median concentration of hepcidin in the COVID-19+ group compared with COVID19- group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hepcidins , COVID-19/metabolism , Growth Differentiation Factor 15 , Hepcidins/metabolism , Humans , Iron/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Transferrin/metabolism
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19618, 2021 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450293

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology and the factors determining disease severity in COVID-19 are not yet clear, with current data indicating a possible role of altered iron metabolism. Previous studies of iron parameters in COVID-19 are cross-sectional and have not studied catalytic iron, the biologically most active form of iron. The study was done to determine the role of catalytic iron in the adverse outcomes in COVID-19. We enrolled adult patients hospitalized with a clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 and measured serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, hepcidin and serum catalytic iron daily. Primary outcome was a composite of in-hospital mortality, need for mechanical ventilation, and kidney replacement therapy. Associations between longitudinal iron parameter measurements and time-to-event outcomes were examined using a joint model. We enrolled 120 patients (70 males) with median age 50 years. The primary composite outcome was observed in 25 (20.8%) patients-mechanical ventilation was needed in 21 (17.5%) patients and in-hospital mortality occurred in 21 (17.5%) patients. Baseline levels of ferritin and hepcidin were significantly associated with the primary composite outcome. The joint model analysis showed that ferritin levels were significantly associated with primary composite outcome [HR (95% CI) = 2.63 (1.62, 4.24) after adjusting for age and gender]. Both ferritin and serum catalytic iron levels were positively associated with in-hospital mortality [HR (95% CI) = 3.22 (2.05, 5.07) and 1.73 (1.21, 2.47), respectively], after adjusting for age and gender. The study shows an association of ferritin and catalytic iron with adverse outcomes in COVID-19. This suggests new pathophysiologic pathways in this disease, also raising the possibility of considering iron chelation therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Iron/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Ferritins/blood , Ferritins/metabolism , Hepcidins/blood , Hepcidins/metabolism , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Iron/chemistry , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Transferrin/chemistry , Transferrin/metabolism
6.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 35(8): 763-773, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725658

ABSTRACT

Iron metabolism and anemia may play an important role in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate biomarkers of anemia and iron metabolism (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin, soluble transferrin receptor, hepcidin, haptoglobin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, erythropoietin, free erythrocyte protoporphyrine, and erythrocyte indices) in patients diagnosed with COVID-19, and explored their prognostic value. Six bibliographic databases were searched up to August 3rd 2020. We included 189 unique studies, with data from 57,563 COVID-19 patients. Pooled mean hemoglobin and ferritin levels in COVID-19 patients across all ages were 129.7 g/L (95% Confidence Interval (CI), 128.51; 130.88) and 777.33 ng/mL (95% CI, 701.33; 852.77), respectively. Hemoglobin levels were lower with older age, higher percentage of subjects with diabetes, hypertension and overall comorbidities, and admitted to intensive care. Ferritin level increased with older age, increasing proportion of hypertensive study participants, and increasing proportion of mortality. Compared to moderate cases, severe COVID-19 cases had lower hemoglobin [weighted mean difference (WMD), - 4.08 g/L (95% CI - 5.12; - 3.05)] and red blood cell count [WMD, - 0.16 × 1012 /L (95% CI - 0.31; - 0.014)], and higher ferritin [WMD, - 473.25 ng/mL (95% CI 382.52; 563.98)] and red cell distribution width [WMD, 1.82% (95% CI 0.10; 3.55)]. A significant difference in mean ferritin levels of 606.37 ng/mL (95% CI 461.86; 750.88) was found between survivors and non-survivors, but not in hemoglobin levels. Future studies should explore the impact of iron metabolism and anemia in the pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anemia/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus/metabolism , Iron/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/analysis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Erythropoietin , Ferritins/blood , Hemoglobins/analysis , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Hepcidins/blood , Hepcidins/metabolism , Humans , Iron/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Receptors, Transferrin/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Transferrin/analysis , Transferrin/metabolism
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