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3.
Cutis ; 109(1): E5-E7, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707291

ABSTRACT

Herpes zoster (HZ) was suspected as a predictive cutaneous manifestation of COVID-19, with a debated prognostic significance. We report a series of 5 cases of HZ occurring after vaccination with a nucleoside-modified messenger RNA (mRNA) COVID-19 vaccine (Comirnaty, Pfizer-BioNTech). These new cases do not prove causality between COVID-19 vaccination and HZ. The pathophysiologic mechanism remains elusive, but local vaccine-induced immunomodulation may be involved. The occurrence of HZ does not justify avoiding the second injection of vaccine due to the benefit of vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19 Vaccines , Herpes Zoster/diagnosis , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Humans , Nucleosides/adverse effects , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 21(5): 675-684, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A few cases of Herpes Zoster and Simplex reactivation following COVID-19 immunization have been recently described, but the real extent of this suspected adverse event has not been elucidated yet. METHODS: We performed a nested case/control study by using the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System database. We carried out a case-level clinical review of all Herpes reactivation cases following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines. For cases and controls, significance was set at P = 0.05, differential risk of reporting was assessed for each vaccine as reporting odds ratio and incidence was estimated based on the total number of vaccine doses administered. RESULTS: Of 6,195 cases included in the analysis (5,934 and 273 reporting Herpes Zoster and Herpes Simplex, respectively) over 90% were non-serious. We found a slightly higher risk of reporting both for Zoster (ROR = 1.49) and Simplex (ROR = 1.51) infections following the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The estimated incidence was approximately 0.7/100,000 and 0.03/100,000 for Zoster and Simplex, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The paucity of cases (almost all of non-serious nature) makes the potential occurrence of this adverse effect negligible from clinical standpoints, thus supporting the good safety profile of the COVID-19 vaccination, which remains strongly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Simplex , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Vaccines , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines/adverse effects
5.
Br J Clin Pharmacol ; 88(7): 3529-3534, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691620

ABSTRACT

Several cases of herpes zoster (HZ) following mRNA COVID-19 vaccination (BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273) have been reported, and the first epidemiological evidence suggests an increased risk. We used the worldwide pharmacovigilance database VigiBase to describe HZ cases following mRNA COVID-19 vaccination. We performed disproportionality analyses (case/non-case statistical approach) to assess the relative risk of HZ reporting in mRNA COVID-19 vaccine recipients compared to influenza vaccine recipients and according to patient age. To 30 June 2021, of 716 928 reports with mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, we found 7728 HZ cases. When compared to influenza vaccines, mRNA COVID-19 vaccines were associated with a significantly higher reporting of HZ (reporting odds ratio 1.9, 95% CI 1.8-2.1). Furthermore, we found a reduced risk of reporting HZ among under 40-year-old persons compared to older persons (reporting odds ratio 0.39, 95% CI 0.36-0.41). Mild and infrequent HZ reactions may occur shortly after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination, at higher frequency than reported with influenza vaccination, especially in patients over 40 years old. Further analyses are needed to confirm this risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Influenza Vaccines , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/adverse effects , RNA, Messenger , Vaccination/adverse effects
6.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 21(5): 601-608, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following COVID-19 vaccination, several herpes zoster cases have been reported, making it critical to explore the association between herpes zoster and COVID-19 vaccination. This is especially true in the context of increasing the number of participants enrolled to receive COVID-19 vaccination. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE, were searched for relevant studies before 25 December 2021 according to preliminarily determined inclusion and exclusion criteria without any language limitations. Four cohort studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. RESULTS: Compared with the placebo group, there was no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccination group was associated with increased incidence of herpes zoster (Risk ratio [RR]: 1.06; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91 to 1.24). There is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccination from Moderna is associated with the incidence of herpes zoster compared with vaccination from Pfizer (RR: 0.20; 95% CI: 0.01 to 2.99). CONCLUSIONS: To date, there is no evidence of an association between covid-19 vaccination and herpes zoster.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Vaccination
7.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 20(11): 3350-3361, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488220

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although the COVID-19 vaccination is deemed safe, exact incidence and nature if adverse effects, particularly dermatological ones, are still unknown. OBJECTIVE: To describe the demographic, clinical, morphological characteristics, outcomes, and timing of development of herpes zoster to the various COVID-19 vaccines. And to identify on whether COVID-19 vaccine has temporal relationship between development of herpes zoster (HZ). METHODS: We have performed a systemic review of articles from PubMed and Embase using MeSH and keywords like "Shingles," "Herpes zoster," "Varicella zoster," "COVID-19," "Vaccine," "SARS-CoV-2." No filters including country of publication, language, type of articles were applied. Individual case report references were filtered for any pertinent cases. RESULTS: A total of 54 cases consisting of 27 male and 27 female patients have been reported. There were cases with known risk factors for herpes zoster, which included age more than 50 years (n = 36), immunological disorders (n = 10), chronic disease (n = 25), metabolic disorder (n = 13), malignancy (n = 4), and psychiatric disorder (n = 2). The mean (SD) period between development of herpes zoster and COVID-19 vaccination was 7.64 (6.92) days. Majority of the cases were from the high-income and/or middle-income countries. 86.27% of the cases of HZ were reported due to mRNA vaccine. Thirty-six patients 36/45 (80%) developed herpes zoster following the priming dose of COVID-19 vaccine among those who received mRNA vaccine. CONCLUSION: We could not establish definite link but there may be possible association between COVID-19 vaccine and shingles. Large-scale studies may help to understand the cause-effect relationship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chickenpox , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Anat ; 35(1): 45-51, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432368

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In this review, cases of herpes zoster (HZ) infection following receipt of COVID-19 vaccines will be analyzed. We also present two cases of oral HZ following the COVID-19 vaccine and discuss this clinical anatomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A database search using PubMed was conducted in August 2021 and 20 articles were found to be eligible for review. Patient data and vaccine information were analyzed. In addition, two cases of oral HZ infection following the receipt of COVID-19 vaccines are presented. RESULTS: A total of 399 cases were identified. The affected dermatomes mimicked the regular distribution of HZ. For the dermatomes of the face, the various reports used different ways to describe the areas involved; CNV, CNV1, CNV2, CNV3, lower jaw, forehead, and under the eyebrow (CNV, 2 cases; CNV1, 4 cases; CNV2, 3 cases; and CNV3, 3 cases). Some patients who had a history of varicella zoster virus vaccination had HZ following the COVID-19 vaccination. Two patients with oral HZ following vaccination were found to have involvement of the greater palatine nerve. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-related HZ cases have been reported worldwide. Although many studies with a larger number of cases are ongoing, detailed information can be obtained from case reviews as reported herein.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/etiology , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
11.
J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol ; 35(12): e845-e846, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345982
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(3): e043880, 2021 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153680

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety of live attenuated herpes zoster vaccine live (ZVL) through cumulative analysis of near real-time, participant-based active surveillance from Australia's AusVaxSafety system. DESIGN AND SETTING: ZVL was funded in Australia for adults aged 70 years from November 2016, with a time-limited catch up programme for those up to 79 years. This cohort study monitored safety in the first two programme years through active surveillance at 246 sentinel surveillance immunisation sites. PARTICIPANTS: Adults aged 70-79 years vaccinated with ZVL who responded to an opt-out survey sent via automated short message service (SMS) 3 days following vaccination (n=17 458) or contributed supplementary data through a separate, opt-in online survey at 16 and 24 days following vaccination (n=346). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of overall and prespecified adverse events following immunisation (AEFI) by sex, concomitant vaccination and underlying medical condition. Signal detection methods (fast initial response cumulative summation and Bayesian updating analyses) were applied to reports of medical attendance. RESULTS: The median age of participants was 72 years; 53% were female. The response rate following automated SMS was high (73% within 7 days of vaccination). Females were more likely than males to report any adverse event within 7 days of vaccination (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.86 to 2.31); injection site reaction was the most commonly reported (2.3%, n=377). Concomitant vaccination was not associated with higher adverse event rates (RR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.18). Rates of medical attendance were low (0.3%) with no safety signals identified. Supplementary opt-in survey data on later onset adverse events did not identify any difference in AEFI rates between those with and without underlying medical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: ZVL has a very good safety profile in the first week after vaccination in older adults. Active, participant-based surveillance in this primary care cohort is an effective method to monitor vaccine safety among older adults and will be used as a key component of COVID-19 vaccine safety surveillance in Australia.


Subject(s)
Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Watchful Waiting , Aged , Australia/epidemiology , Bayes Theorem , Cohort Studies , Female , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/administration & dosage , Humans , Male , Vaccination
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