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1.
Agri ; 35(2): 103-106, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2297450

ABSTRACT

Vaccination programs against COVID-19 have been implemented all over the world since December 2020. Beside the common side effects of vaccines, there are also increasing reports of herpes zoster (HZ) activation. In this report, we describe three cases of HZ, one of them with post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) after receiving inactivated COVID-19 vaccine. The first two patients developed HZ 8 and 10 days after vaccination, respectively. When pain could not be controlled with paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, the patients received weak opioid codeine. In addition, the first patient received gabapentin, and the second patient was applied erector spinae plane block. The third patient was admitted 4 months after the diagnosis of HZ and considered to have PHN and pain palliation was provided with tramadol. Although the exact cause has not yet been fully resolved, increased reports of HZ after vaccination suggests a link between vaccines and HZ. Considering that receiving COVID-19 vaccines will going on, HZ and PHN cases will continue to be seen. More epidemiological studies are needed to further evaluate the relationship between COVID-19 vaccines and HZ.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , Neuralgia, Postherpetic , Humans , Neuralgia, Postherpetic/etiology , Neuralgia, Postherpetic/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Herpes Zoster/drug therapy , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human
2.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(1): 2175558, 2023 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284830

ABSTRACT

Herpes zoster (HZ) results from waning immunity following childhood infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) but is preventable by vaccination with recombinant HZ vaccine or live HZ vaccine (two doses or one dose, respectively). Vaccine efficacy declines with age, live HZ vaccine is contraindicated in immunosuppressed individuals, and severe local reactogenicity of recombinant HZ vaccine is seen in up to 20% of older adults, indicating a potential need for new vaccines. Nonreplicating chimpanzee adenovirus (ChAd) vectors combine potent immunogenicity with well-established reactogenicity and safety profiles. We evaluated the cellular and humoral immunogenicity of ChAdOx1 encoding VZV envelope glycoprotein E (ChAdOx1-VZVgE) in mice using IFN-γ ELISpot, flow cytometry with intracellular cytokine staining, and ELISA. In outbred CD-1 mice, one dose of ChAdOx1-VZVgE (1 × 107 infectious units) elicited higher gE-specific T cell responses than two doses of recombinant HZ vaccine (1 µg) or one dose of live HZ vaccine (1.3 × 103 plaque-forming units). Antibody responses were higher with two doses of recombinant HZ vaccine than with two doses of ChAdOx1-VZVgE or one dose of live HZ vaccine. ChAdOx1-VZVgE boosted T cell and antibody responses following live HZ vaccine priming. The frequencies of polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing more than one cytokine (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2) were higher with ChAdOx1-VZVgE than with the conventional vaccines. Results were similar in young and aged BALB/c mice. These findings support the clinical development of ChAdOx1-VZVgE for prevention of HZ in adults aged 50 years or over, including those who have already received conventional vaccines.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Vaccines , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Animals , Mice , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Adenoviridae/genetics , Antibodies, Viral , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Vaccination/methods , Cytokines , Immunogenicity, Vaccine
3.
Vaccine ; 41(6): 1254-1264, 2023 02 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2165937

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Older adults are at increased risk for adverse health outcomes when having an influenza, pneumococcal disease, pertussis, or herpes zoster infection. Despite the ability of vaccinations to prevent these adverse outcomes, vaccination coverage is low in the European Union. This study aimed to explore the sociodemographic, lifestyle, and health-related characteristics associated with vaccination willingness for these vaccine-preventable diseases. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from wave 6 (years 2013-2017) of the population-based Doetinchem Cohort Study was analysed, with 3063 participants aged 46-86 years included. The outcome was the self-reported willingness to get vaccinated against influenza, pneumococcal disease, pertussis, and herpes zoster (willing, neutral, not willing). Multinomial logistic regression was used to investigate the socio-demographic, lifestyle and health characteristics associated with vaccination willingness. RESULTS: For influenza 36 % was willing to get vaccinated, 35 % was neutral and 28 % was not willing to get vaccinated. The willingness to get vaccinated for the relatively unfamiliar vaccine-preventable diseases was lower: 26 % for pneumococcal disease (neutral: 50 %, not willing: 23 %), 26 % for pertussis (neutral 53 %, not willing: 22 %), and 23 % for herpes zoster (neutral 54 %, not willing: 24 %). A relative lower willingness was found among those 46-64 years old (compared to those 65 years or older). Women, having a high SES, being employed and having a good health were all associated with lower willingness to get vaccinated, which was the case for all vaccine-preventable diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults were generally more willing to get vaccinated against influenza than for the three less familiar diseases. Characteristics of those less willing may be used to improve strategies to increase vaccination coverage. Additional studies are needed to investigate the willingness to get vaccinated during and after the COVID-19 pandemic that may have changed the feel of urgency for vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Pneumococcal Infections , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases , Whooping Cough , Humans , Female , Aged , Middle Aged , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Whooping Cough/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Cohort Studies , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Vaccination , Pneumococcal Infections/prevention & control
4.
Virol Sin ; 37(5): 731-739, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150803

ABSTRACT

Latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) may be reactivated to cause herpes zoster, which affects one in three people during their lifetime. The currently available subunit vaccine Shingrix™ is superior to the attenuated vaccine Zostavax® in terms of both safety and efficacy, but the supply of its key adjuvant component QS21 is limited. With ionizable lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) that were recently approved by the FDA for COVID-19 mRNA vaccines as carriers, and oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs (CpG ODNs) approved by the FDA for a subunit hepatitis B vaccine as immunostimulators, we developed a LNP vaccine encapsulating VZV-glycoprotein E (gE) and CpG ODN, and compared its immunogenicity with Shingrix™ in C57BL/6J mice. The results showed that the LNP vaccine induced comparable levels of gE-specific IgG antibodies to Shingrix™ as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Most importantly, the LNP vaccine induced comparable levels of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) that plays decisive roles in the efficacy of zoster vaccines to Shingrix™ in a VZV-primed mouse model that was adopted for preclinical studies of Shingrix™. Number of IL-2 and IFN-γ secreting splenocytes and proportion of T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine-expressing CD4+ T cells in LNP-CpG-adjuvanted VZV-gE vaccinated mice were similar to that of Shingrix™ boosted mice. All of the components in this LNP vaccine can be artificially and economically synthesized in large quantities, indicating the potential of LNP-CpG-adjuvanted VZV-gE as a more cost-effective zoster vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Adjuvants, Immunologic , Animals , Antibodies, Viral , Hepatitis B Vaccines , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human/genetics , Immunoglobulin G , Interleukin-2 , Liposomes , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nanoparticles , Oligodeoxyribonucleotides , Vaccines, Attenuated , Vaccines, Subunit
5.
Vaccine ; 40(50): 7187-7190, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2132600

ABSTRACT

In 2018, CDC recommended a highly efficacious adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) as a 2-dose series for prevention of herpes zoster (HZ) for immunocompetent persons age ≥ 50 years, with the 2nd dose recommended 2-6 months after the 1st dose. We estimated second-dose RZV series completion in the U.S. among 50-64-year-olds using two administrative databases. Second-dose RZV series completion was ∼70% within 6-months and 80% within 12-months of first dose. Among those who received only 1 RZV dose with at least 12 months of follow-up time, 96% had a missed opportunity for a second-dose vaccination, defined as a provider or pharmacy visit, among whom 36% had a visit for influenza or pneumococcal vaccination within 2-12 months of their first-dose of RZV. We found that RZV series completion rates in 50-64-year-olds was high. Availability of RZV at pharmacies has potentially helped increase series completion, but missed opportunities remain.


Subject(s)
Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Adult , Humans , United States , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Vaccines, Synthetic
6.
Vaccine ; 40(50): 7182-7186, 2022 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2132599

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE(S): To estimate HZ vaccine coverage in Australia among older Australians and to identify potential barriers to vaccination. DESIGN: Analysis of data from three cross-sectional surveys administered online between 2019 and 2020. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Adults aged 65 and over residing in Australia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported herpes zoster vaccination. RESULTS: Among the 744 adults aged 65 and over in this sample, 32% reported being vaccinated for HZ, including 23% of participants aged 65-74, 55% of participants aged 75-84, and 0% for participants aged 85 and above. Those who are vaccinated with other immunisations are more likely to have received HZ vaccine, including seasonal influenza (OR = 4.41, 95 % CI: 2.44-7.98) and pneumococcal vaccines (OR = 4.43, 95 % CI: 2.92 - 6.75). Participants with a history of certain conditions, such as stroke (OR = 2.26, 95 % CI: 1.13-4.49), were more likely to be vaccinated against HZ. Participants that reported smoking tobacco daily were less likely to be vaccinated against HZ (OR = 0.48, 95 % CI: 0.26-0.89). Participants were less likely to be vaccinated against HZ if they preferred to develop immunity 'naturally' (OR = 0.29, 95 % CI: 0.15 - 0.57) or expressed distrust of vaccines (OR = 0.34, 95 % CI: 0.13-0.91). CONCLUSION(S): Further research is required to understand the barriers to HZ vaccine uptake. Increasing the funding eligibility for those who are at risk of complications from shingles, or lowering the age of eligibility, may increase vaccine coverage.


Subject(s)
Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Humans , Adult , Australia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Vaccination , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(11): e2242240, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119149

ABSTRACT

Importance: Herpes zoster infection after COVID-19 vaccination has been reported in numerous case studies. It is not known whether these cases represent increased reporting or a true increase in risk. Objective: To assess whether COVID-19 vaccination is associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster infection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used a self-controlled risk interval (SCRI) design to compare the risk of herpes zoster in a risk interval of 30 days after COVID-19 vaccination or up to the date of the second vaccine dose with a control interval remote from COVID-19 vaccination (defined as 60-90 days after the last recorded vaccination date for each individual, allowing for a 30-day washout period between control and risk intervals). A supplemental cohort analysis was used to compare the risk of herpes zoster after COVID-19 vaccination with the risk of herpes zoster after influenza vaccination among 2 historical cohorts who received an influenza vaccine in the prepandemic period (January 1, 2018, to December 31, 2019) or the early pandemic period (March 1, 2020, to November 30, 2020). Data were obtained from Optum Labs Data Warehouse, a US national deidentified claims-based database. A total of 2 039 854 individuals who received any dose of a COVID-19 vaccine with emergency use authorization (BNT162b2 [Pfizer-BioNTech], mRNA-1273 [Moderna], or Ad26.COV2.S [Johnson & Johnson]) from December 11, 2020, through June 30, 2021, were eligible for inclusion. Individuals included in the SCRI analysis were a subset of the COVID-19-vaccinated cohort who had herpes zoster during either a risk or control interval. Exposures: Any dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incident herpes zoster, defined by International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision codes and a prescription of a new antiviral medication or a dose increase in antiviral medication within 5 days of diagnosis. Results: Among 2 039 854 individuals who received any dose of a COVID-19 vaccine during the study period, the mean (SD) age was 43.2 (16.3) years; 1 031 149 individuals (50.6%) were female, and 1 344 318 (65.9%) were White. Of those, 1451 patients (mean [SD] age, 51.6 [12.6] years; 845 [58.2%] female) with a herpes zoster diagnosis were included in the primary SCRI analysis. In the SCRI analysis, COVID-19 vaccination was not associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster after adjustment (incidence rate ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.82-1.01; P = .08). In the supplementary cohort analysis, COVID-19 vaccination was not associated with a higher risk of herpes zoster compared with influenza vaccination in the prepandemic period (first dose of COVID-19 vaccine: hazard ratio [HR], 0.78 [95% CI, 0.70-0.86; P < .001]; second dose of COVID-19 vaccine: HR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.71-0.88; P < .001]) or the early pandemic period (first dose of COVID-19 vaccine: HR, 0.89 [95% CI, 0.80-1.00; P = .05]; second dose: HR, 0.91 [95% CI, 0.81-1.02; P = .09]). Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, there was no association found between COVID-19 vaccination and an increased risk of herpes zoster infection, which may help to address concerns about the safety profile of the COVID-19 vaccines among patients and clinicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ad26COVS1 , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , BNT162 Vaccine , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpes Zoster/drug therapy , Herpes Zoster Vaccine/adverse effects , Influenza, Human/drug therapy
8.
Vaccine ; 40(47): 6747-6755, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although more than half of older adults receive the annual influenza vaccine (flu shot), only about one-third have ever been vaccinated for shingles. With this in mind, our study examines how the associations between sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, and vaccine uptake differ between these two viruses. In doing so, it also investigates whether the social predictors of shingles vaccination changed after the rollout of a new vaccine in 2017. METHODS: Data come from the 2017 and 2020 waves of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, using a subset of older adults aged 60-plus (N = 389,165). We use logistic regression models to test for associations between individual-level characteristics and vaccine uptake. RESULTS: One, when compared to Whites, Black respondents had approximately 30 % lower odds of having received the annual influenza vaccine (Odds Ratios  [OR] = 0.72 [95 % CI 0.66-0.78] in 2017, and 0.66 [0.60-0.72] in 2020). For the shingles vaccine, these racial differences were starker (OR = 0.53 [0.48-0.59] in 2017, and OR = 0.55 [0.49-0.60] in 2020). Two, self-rated health was negatively associated with having received the influenza vaccine, but showed little relationship with shingles vaccination. Three, men were less likely than women to receive both vaccines in 2020 (OR = 0.88 [0.83-0.94] for influenza, and OR = 0.80 [0.75-0.85] for shingles). Four, older adults who abstained from alcohol were, generally, less likely to receive either vaccine, when compared to both moderate and heavy drinkers. Finally, we found that the release of a new shingles vaccine in 2017 (Shingrix) had little effect on vaccination prevalence or its social determinants. CONCLUSION: The importance of social groups, health, and health behaviors on vaccination status may be disease-dependent. This study also provides possible guidance to health care providers and health organizations looking to increase vaccine uptake among older adults, which may have more urgency since the arrival of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Male , Female , Humans , Aged , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Social Determinants of Health , Vaccination , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control
11.
Eur J Intern Med ; 104: 73-79, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966533

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation has been reported following vaccination for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but the real extent remains unknown. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to summarize evidence of VZV reactivation or infection following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Episodes after coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) were also identified. Related articles were identified in PubMed and EMBASE databases till December 31, 2021 using the terms "varicella zoster" and "COVID-19″. PROSPERO Register Number: CRD42021289399. RESULTS: The search revealed 314 articles, of which 55 met the inclusion criteria. VZV manifestations were documented in 179 (82.1%) subjects following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and in 39 (17.9%) patients with COVID-19. Among the vaccinated, median (IQR) age was 56.5 (42-70) years, and 56.8% were female. Twenty-one (16.8%) were immunosuppressed. The median (IQR) latency time after vaccination was 6 (3-10) days, and 84.4% received mRNA vaccines. VZV reactivation occurred following a first dose (68.2%), a second dose (12.8%) or a booster (0.6%). The most important VZV manifestation was dermatome herpes zoster rash, which accounted for 86.4% of events in vaccinated subjects. Twenty patients (11.3%) presented serious VZV events after vaccination, with Herpes Zoster ophthalmicus (5.6%) and post-herpetic neuralgia (3.4%) predominating. No VZV pneumonia or deaths were recorded. Antiviral prescriptions were made in 96.2% of vaccinated subjects. No significant differences between vaccinated and infected subjects were found. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that the occurrence of VZV reactivation is clinically relevant. However, our findings suggest that COVID-19 vaccination is safe, and remains strongly recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Female , Herpes Zoster/drug therapy , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human/physiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
15.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(9): 3692-3703, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916201

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this study covering all of Turkey, we aimed to define cutaneous and systemic adverse reactions in our patient population after COVID-19 vaccination with the Sinovac/CoronaVac (inactivated SARS-CoV-2) and Pfizer/BioNTech (BNT162b2) vaccines. METHODS: This prospective, cross-sectional study included individuals presenting to the dermatology or emergency outpatient clinics of a total of 19 centers after having been vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccines. Systemic, local injection site, and non-local cutaneous reactions after vaccination were identified, and their rates were determined. RESULTS: Of the 2290 individuals vaccinated between April 15 and July 15, 2021, 2097 (91.6%) received the CoronaVac vaccine and 183 (8%) BioNTech. Systemic reactions were observed at a rate of 31.0% after the first CoronaVac dose, 31.1% after the second CoronaVac dose, 46.4% after the first BioNTech dose, and 46.2% after the second BioNTech dose. Local injection site reactions were detected at a rate of 35.6% after the first CoronaVac dose, 35.7% after the second CoronaVac dose, 86.9% after the first BioNTech dose, and 94.1% after the second BioNTech dose. A total of 133 non-local cutaneous reactions were identified after the CoronaVac vaccine (2.9% after the first dose and 3.5% after the second dose), with the most common being urticaria/angioedema, pityriasis rosea, herpes zoster, and maculopapular rash. After BioNTech, 39 non-local cutaneous reactions were observed to have developed (24.8% after the first dose and 5% after the second dose), and the most common were herpes zoster, delayed large local reaction, pityriasis rosea, and urticaria/angioedema in order of frequency. Existing autoimmune diseases were triggered in 2.1% of the patients vaccinated with CoronaVac and 8.2% of those vaccinated with BioNTech. CONCLUSIONS: There are no comprehensive data on cutaneous adverse reactions specific to the CoronaVac vaccine. We determined the frequency of adverse reactions from the dermatologist's point of view after CoronaVac and BioNTech vaccination and identified a wide spectrum of non-local cutaneous reactions. Our data show that CoronaVac is associated with less harmful reactions while BioNTech may result in more serious reactions, such as herpes zoster, anaphylaxis, and triggering of autoimmunity. However, most of these reactions were self-limiting or required little therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
Angioedema , COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , Pityriasis Rosea , Urticaria , Vaccines , Angioedema/chemically induced , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Herpes Zoster/chemically induced , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Pityriasis Rosea/chemically induced , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology , Urticaria/chemically induced , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines/adverse effects
16.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(7): 1523-1524, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1892585

ABSTRACT

Varicella zoster virus reactivation after COVID-19 vaccination has been reported in older or immunocompromised adults. We report zoster meningitis from live-attenuated varicella vaccine reactivation in an immunocompetent child after COVID-19 vaccination. This type of case is rare; COVID-19 and varicella vaccines remain safe and effective for appropriate recipients in the pediatric population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chickenpox , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , Meningitis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Humans , Vaccination
18.
Dermatol Ther ; 35(7): e15521, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794706

ABSTRACT

Herpes zoster (HZ) is caused by reactivation of the latent varicella zoster virus (VZV) following decline in cell-mediated immunity. All over the world, in the past couple of years, the Corona Virus 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a viral cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome corona virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Based on the current limited evidence, co-infection of COVID-19 with VZV or reactivation of VZV after COVID-19 vaccination has been sporadically reported. All patients diagnosed with HZ, in Farwaniya Hospital in Kuwait, from March 2020 to July 2021, having either (A) a positive COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, or (B) been vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 were enrolled in the study. All patients' demographic information, medical history, laboratory findings, and vaccination status was documented. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS Statistics version 21.0 software. Twelve cases infected with COVID-19 with a positive PCR (group 1) and five cases vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 (group 2) were documented. Out of the 12 COVID-19 infected patients (group 1), only two patients (16.67%) required hospitalization, while the remaining 10 patients had mild/moderate lymphopenia. Furthermore, amongst the 12 positive COVID-19 cases, four patients with HZ were diagnosed within the first week of COVID-19, while the remaining eight cases were diagnosed within 8 weeks of COVID-19. Thoracic segments were affected in five cases (41.67%), cervical in one case (8.33%), cranial in two cases (16.67%), lumbar in three cases (25%) and sacral in one case (8.33%). In group 2, three patients presented with HZ within 4 weeks of having received the first dose of the vaccine and two patients after the second dose. Blood investigations for all five vaccinated patients did not show any abnormalities. Cervical segments were affected in two patients (40%), and cranial, thoracic, and lumbar segment in the remaining patients respectively (20%). Experts must be aware of the probable increased risk of HZ during the COVID 19 pandemic. We propose appropriate curative and preventive measures against HZ infection, including a systematic follow-up of these patients to ensure that they stick to extreme safety measures till the diagnosis of COVID-19 is omitted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster Vaccine , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/diagnosis , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
19.
Indian J Public Health ; 66(1): 83-85, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776455

ABSTRACT

Ever since the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, science has unraveled much knowledge on SARS-CoV-2 which has led to extraordinary and unprecedented progress in developing COVID-19 vaccines. Several adverse cutaneous reactions, ranging from more common local injection site reaction, neutrophilic and pustular drug reactions to flare-up of preexisting dermatoses, have been reported with currently available vaccines. We report a case series of 7 patients who developed herpes zoster (HZ) following the first dose of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine (recombinant). HZ following vaccination is a rare entity. The occurrence of HZ in the patients presented in this series within the time window 1-21 days after vaccination defined for increased risk and postulated dysregulation of T-cell-mediated immunity, suggests that the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 coronavirus vaccine (recombinant) could probably be a trigger for reactivation of varicella zoster virus to cause HZ in them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Herpes Zoster/epidemiology , Herpes Zoster/etiology , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , India , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
20.
Fam Pract ; 39(5): 939-942, 2022 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730674

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The advent of vaccination against COVID-19 brought great expectations for the control of the pandemic. As novel vaccines, much of the associated side effects were unknown. Currently, an increasing number of reports from side effects of COVID-19 vaccines have been published, namely on cutaneous reactions. These are of utmost importance to increase our knowledge about possible undesirable effects and its prevention. METHODS: We describe a series of 3 cases who presented with varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation following the first dose of 3 different COVID-19 vaccines. RESULTS: Three patients sought their Family Doctor after developing typical lesions of VZV reactivation, following a period of 3-13 days after COVID-19 vaccination. None was under immunosuppressive therapy. The 3 patients recovered in a few weeks and the subsequent doses of the vaccines were administered, without recurrence of the symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: These cases highlight the possibility of VZV reactivation after the first dose of COVID-19 vaccines. Family Doctors should be aware of this event and play an important role informing and reassuring local communities for this possible vaccine reaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Herpes Zoster , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Herpes Zoster/prevention & control , Herpesvirus 3, Human , Humans , Vaccines, Attenuated/therapeutic use
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