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1.
J Mater Chem B ; 9(42): 8851-8861, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526111

ABSTRACT

Nanomaterial-based optical techniques for biomarker detection have garnered tremendous attention from the nanofabrication community due to their high precision and enhanced limit of detection (LoD) features. These nanomaterials are highly responsive to local refractive index (RI) fluctuations, and their RI unit sensitivity can be tuned by varying the chemical composition, geometry, and dimensions of the utilized nanostructures. To improve the sensitivity and LoD values of these nanomaterials, it is common to increase both dimensions and aspect ratios of the fabricated nanostructures. However, limited by the complexity, prolonged duration, and elevated costs of the available nanofabrication techniques, mass production of these nanostructures remains challenging. To address not only high accuracy, but also speed and production effectiveness in these nanostructures' fabrication, our work reports, for the first time, a fast, high-throughput, and cost-effective nanofabrication protocol for routine manufacturing of polymer-based nanostructures with high sensitivity and calculated LoD in the pM range by utilizing anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes as templates. Specifically, our developed platform consists of arrays of nearly uniform polystyrene nanopillars with an average diameter of ∼185 nm and aspect ratio of ∼11. We demonstrate that these nanostructures can be produced at a high speed and a notably low price, and that they can be efficiently applied for biosensing purposes after being coated with aluminum-doped silver (Ag/Al) thin films. Our platform successfully detected very low concentrations of human C-reactive protein (hCRP) and SARS-CoV-2 spike protein biomarkers in human plasma samples with LoDs of 11 and 5 pM, respectively. These results open new opportunities for day-to-day fabrication of high aspect ratio arrays of nanopillars that can be used as a base for nanoplasmonic sensors with competitive LoD values. This, in turn, contributes to the development of point-of-care devices and further improvement of the existing nanofabrication techniques, thereby enriching the fields of pharmacology, clinical analysis, and diagnostics.


Subject(s)
Aluminum Oxide/chemistry , Biomarkers/blood , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Nanostructures/chemistry , Silver/chemistry , Biosensing Techniques , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Dimethylpolysiloxanes/chemistry , Humans , Limit of Detection , Point-of-Care Systems , Polystyrenes/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood
2.
Viruses ; 13(8)2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524167

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 continues to spread despite the global efforts taken to control it. The 3C-like protease (3CLpro), the major protease of SARS-CoV-2, is one of the most interesting targets for antiviral drug development because it is highly conserved among SARS-CoVs and plays an important role in viral replication. Herein, we developed high throughput screening for SARS-CoV-2 3CLpro inhibitor based on AlphaScreen. We screened 91 natural product compounds and found that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), an FDA-approved drug, inhibited 3CLpro activity. The 3CLpro inhibitory effect of ATRA was confirmed in vitro by both immunoblotting and AlphaScreen with a 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) of 24.7 ± 1.65 µM. ATRA inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV-2 in VeroE6/TMPRSS2 and Calu-3 cells, with IC50 = 2.69 ± 0.09 µM in the former and 0.82 ± 0.01 µM in the latter. Further, we showed the anti-SARS-CoV-2 effect of ATRA on the currently circulating variants of concern (VOC); alpha, beta, gamma, and delta. These results suggest that ATRA may be considered as a potential therapeutic agent against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Tretinoin/pharmacology , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cysteine Proteinase Inhibitors/pharmacology , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
3.
Nat Biotechnol ; 39(7): 809-810, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510601
4.
ACS Infect Dis ; 7(6): 1409-1422, 2021 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493008

ABSTRACT

Arenaviruses are a large family of enveloped negative-strand RNA viruses that include several causative agents of severe hemorrhagic fevers. Currently, there are no FDA-licensed drugs to treat arenavirus infection except for the off-labeled use of ribavirin. Here, we performed antiviral drug screening against the Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) using an FDA-approved drug library. Five drug candidates were identified, including mycophenolic acid, benidipine hydrochloride, clofazimine, dabrafenib, and apatinib, for having strong anti-LCMV effects. Further analysis indicated that benidipine hydrochloride inhibited LCMV membrane fusion, and an adaptive mutation on the LCMV glycoprotein D414 site was found to antagonize the anti-LCMV activity of benidipine hydrochloride. Mycophenolic acid inhibited LCMV replication by depleting GTP production. We also found mycophenolic acid, clofazimine, dabrafenib, and apatinib can inhibit the newly emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Owing to their FDA-approved status, these drug candidates can potentially be used rapidly in the clinical treatment of arenavirus and SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Preparations , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Replication
5.
J Virol ; 95(16): e0018721, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486048

ABSTRACT

Subversion of the host cell cycle to facilitate viral replication is a common feature of coronavirus infections. Coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein can modulate the host cell cycle, but the mechanistic details remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of manipulation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) N protein on the cell cycle and the influence on viral replication. Results indicated that PEDV N induced Vero E6 cell cycle arrest at S-phase, which promoted viral replication (P < 0.05). S-phase arrest was dependent on the N protein nuclear localization signal S71NWHFYYLGTGPHADLRYRT90 and the interaction between N protein and p53. In the nucleus, the binding of N protein to p53 maintained consistently high-level expression of p53, which activated the p53-DREAM pathway. The key domain of the N protein interacting with p53 was revealed to be S171RGNSQNRGNNQGRGASQNRGGNN194 (NS171-N194), in which G183RG185 are core residues. NS171-N194 and G183RG185 were essential for N-induced S-phase arrest. Moreover, small molecular drugs targeting the NS171-N194 domain of the PEDV N protein were screened through molecular docking. Hyperoside could antagonize N protein-induced S-phase arrest by interfering with interaction between N protein and p53 and inhibit viral replication (P < 0.05). The above-described experiments were also validated in porcine intestinal cells, and data were in line with results in Vero E6 cells. Therefore, these results reveal the PEDV N protein interacts with p53 to activate the p53-DREAM pathway, and subsequently induces S-phase arrest to create a favorable environment for virus replication. These findings provide new insight into the PEDV-host interaction and the design of novel antiviral strategies against PEDV. IMPORTANCE Many viruses subvert the host cell cycle to create a cellular environment that promotes viral growth. PEDV, an emerging and reemerging coronavirus, has led to substantial economic loss in the global swine industry. Our study is the first to demonstrate that PEDV N-induced cell cycle arrest during the S-phase promotes viral replication. We identified a novel mechanism of PEDV N-induced S-phase arrest, where the binding of PEDV N protein to p53 maintains consistently high levels of p53 expression in the nucleus to mediate S-phase arrest by activating the p53-DREAM pathway. Furthermore, a small molecular compound, hyperoside, targeted the PEDV N protein, interfering with the interaction between the N protein and p53 and, importantly, inhibited PEDV replication by antagonizing cell cycle arrest. This study reveals a new mechanism of PEDV-host interaction and also provides a novel antiviral strategy for PEDV. These data provide a foundation for further research into coronavirus-host interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/drug effects , Quercetin/analogs & derivatives , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/drug effects , Epithelial Cells/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Molecular Docking Simulation , Nuclear Localization Signals , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/genetics , Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/pharmacology , S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/drug effects , S Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics , Signal Transduction , Swine , Swine Diseases/drug therapy , Swine Diseases/genetics , Swine Diseases/metabolism , Swine Diseases/virology , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
6.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480884

ABSTRACT

Mosquito-borne viruses including dengue, Zika, and Chikungunya viruses, and parasites such as malaria and Onchocerca volvulus endanger health and economic security around the globe, and emerging mosquito-borne pathogens have pandemic potential. However, the rapid spread of insecticide resistance threatens our ability to control mosquito vectors. Larvae of Aedes aegypti were screened with the Medicines for Malaria Venture Pandemic Response Box, an open-source compound library, using INVAPP, an invertebrate automated phenotyping platform suited to high-throughput chemical screening of larval motility. We identified rubitecan (a synthetic derivative of camptothecin) as a hit compound that reduced A. aegypti larval motility. Both rubitecan and camptothecin displayed concentration dependent reduction in larval motility with estimated EC50 of 25.5 ± 5.0 µM and 22.3 ± 5.4 µM, respectively. We extended our investigation to adult mosquitoes and found that camptothecin increased lethality when delivered in a blood meal to A. aegypti adults at 100 µM and 10 µM, and completely blocked egg laying when fed at 100 µM. Camptothecin and its derivatives are inhibitors of topoisomerase I, have known activity against several agricultural pests, and are also approved for the treatment of several cancers. Crucially, they can inhibit Zika virus replication in human cells, so there is potential for dual targeting of both the vector and an important arbovirus that it carries.


Subject(s)
Aedes/drug effects , Aedes/virology , Camptothecin/analogs & derivatives , Insecticides/pharmacology , Mosquito Vectors/drug effects , Mosquito Vectors/virology , Aedes/physiology , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Camptothecin/pharmacology , Drug Discovery , Female , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Insecticide Resistance , Larva/drug effects , Larva/physiology , Motor Activity/drug effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Topoisomerase I Inhibitors/pharmacology , Vector Borne Diseases/epidemiology , Vector Borne Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Replication/drug effects , Zika Virus/drug effects
7.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20143, 2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462040

ABSTRACT

Rapid, high-throughput diagnostic tests are essential to decelerate the spread of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. While RT-PCR tests performed in centralized laboratories remain the gold standard, rapid point-of-care antigen tests might provide faster results. However, they are associated with markedly reduced sensitivity. Bedside breath gas analysis of volatile organic compounds detected by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) may enable a quick and sensitive point-of-care testing alternative. In this proof-of-concept study, we investigated whether gas analysis by IMS can discriminate severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) from other respiratory viruses in an experimental set-up. Repeated gas analyses of air samples collected from the headspace of virus-infected in vitro cultures were performed for 5 days. A three-step decision tree using the intensities of four spectrometry peaks correlating to unidentified volatile organic compounds allowed the correct classification of SARS-CoV-2, human coronavirus-NL63, and influenza A virus H1N1 without misassignment when the calculation was performed with data 3 days post infection. The forward selection assignment model allowed the identification of SARS-CoV-2 with high sensitivity and specificity, with only one of 231 measurements (0.43%) being misclassified. Thus, volatile organic compound analysis by IMS allows highly accurate differentiation of SARS-CoV-2 from other respiratory viruses in an experimental set-up, supporting further research and evaluation in clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Viral/isolation & purification , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Point-of-Care Testing , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/instrumentation , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus NL63, Human/immunology , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Diagnosis, Differential , High-Throughput Screening Assays/instrumentation , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/isolation & purification , Ion Mobility Spectrometry , Proof of Concept Study , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vero Cells
8.
Elife ; 102021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456505

ABSTRACT

The absence of 'shovel-ready' anti-coronavirus drugs during vaccine development has exceedingly worsened the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Furthermore, new vaccine-resistant variants and coronavirus outbreaks may occur in the near future, and we must be ready to face this possibility. However, efficient antiviral drugs are still lacking to this day, due to our poor understanding of the mode of incorporation and mechanism of action of nucleotides analogs that target the coronavirus polymerase to impair its essential activity. Here, we characterize the impact of remdesivir (RDV, the only FDA-approved anti-coronavirus drug) and other nucleotide analogs (NAs) on RNA synthesis by the coronavirus polymerase using a high-throughput, single-molecule, magnetic-tweezers platform. We reveal that the location of the modification in the ribose or in the base dictates the catalytic pathway(s) used for its incorporation. We show that RDV incorporation does not terminate viral RNA synthesis, but leads the polymerase into backtrack as far as 30 nt, which may appear as termination in traditional ensemble assays. SARS-CoV-2 is able to evade the endogenously synthesized product of the viperin antiviral protein, ddhCTP, though the polymerase incorporates this NA well. This experimental paradigm is essential to the discovery and development of therapeutics targeting viral polymerases.


To multiply and spread from cell to cell, the virus responsible for COVID-19 (also known as SARS-CoV-2) must first replicate its genetic information. This process involves a 'polymerase' protein complex making a faithful copy by assembling a precise sequence of building blocks, or nucleotides. The only drug approved against SARS-CoV-2 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), remdesivir, consists of a nucleotide analog, a molecule whose structure is similar to the actual building blocks needed for replication. If the polymerase recognizes and integrates these analogs into the growing genetic sequence, the replication mechanism is disrupted, and the virus cannot multiply. Most approaches to study this process seem to indicate that remdesivir works by stopping the polymerase and terminating replication altogether. Yet, exactly how remdesivir and other analogs impair the synthesis of new copies of the virus remains uncertain. To explore this question, Seifert, Bera et al. employed an approach called magnetic tweezers which uses a magnetic field to manipulate micro-particles with great precision. Unlike other methods, this technique allows analogs to be integrated under conditions similar to those found in cells, and to be examined at the level of a single molecule. The results show that contrary to previous assumptions, remdesivir does not terminate replication; instead, it causes the polymerase to pause and backtrack (which may appear as termination in other techniques). The same approach was then applied to other nucleotide analogs, some of which were also found to target the SARS-CoV-2 polymerase. However, these analogs are incorporated differently to remdesivir and with less efficiency. They also obstruct the polymerase in distinct ways. Taken together, the results by Seifert, Bera et al. suggest that magnetic tweezers can be a powerful approach to reveal how analogs interfere with replication. This information could be used to improve currently available analogs as well as develop new antiviral drugs that are more effective against SARS-CoV-2. This knowledge will be key at a time when treatments against COVID-19 are still lacking, and may be needed to protect against new variants and future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/antagonists & inhibitors , Nucleotides/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/pharmacology , Cell Line , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Nucleotides/metabolism , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Stochastic Processes , Virus Replication/drug effects
9.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(2): e0050621, 2021 10 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455679

ABSTRACT

Emerging SARS-CoV-2 (SC-2) variants with increased infectivity and vaccine resistance are of major concern. Rapid identification of such variants is important for the public health decision making and to provide valuable data for epidemiological and policy decision making. We developed a multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay that can specifically identify and differentiate between the emerging B.1.1.7 and B.1.351 SC-2 variants. In a single assay, we combined four reactions-one that detects SC-2 RNA independently of the strain, one that detects the D3L mutation, which is specific to variant B.1.1.7, one that detects the 242 to 244 deletion, which is specific to variant B.1.351, and the fourth reaction, which identifies the human RNAseP gene, serving as an endogenous control for RNA extraction integrity. We show that the strain-specific reactions target mutations that are strongly associated with the target variants and not with other major known variants. The assay's specificity was tested against a panel of respiratory pathogens (n = 16), showing high specificity toward SC-2 RNA. The assay's sensitivity was assessed using both in vitro transcribed RNA and clinical samples and was determined to be between 20 and 40 viral RNA copies per reaction. The assay performance was corroborated with Sanger and whole-genome sequencing, showing complete agreement with the sequencing results. The new assay is currently implemented in the routine diagnostic work at the Central Virology Laboratory, and may be used in other laboratories to facilitate the diagnosis of these major worldwide-circulating SC-2 variants. IMPORTANCE This study describes the design and utilization of a multiplex reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to identify SARS-COV-2 (SC2) RNA in general and, specifically, to detect whether it is of lineage B.1.1.7 or B.1.351. Implementation of this method in diagnostic and research laboratories worldwide may help the efforts to contain the COVID-19 pandemic. The method can be easily scaled up and be used in high-throughput laboratories, as well as small ones. In addition to immediate help in diagnostic efforts, this method may also help in epidemiological studies focused on the spread of emerging SC-2 lineages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing/methods , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Genome, Viral/genetics , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity , Whole Genome Sequencing
11.
Cell Rep ; 37(1): 109784, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442299

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) lineages that are more transmissible and resistant to currently approved antibody therapies poses a considerable challenge to the clinical treatment of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Therefore, the need for ongoing discovery efforts to identify broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 is of utmost importance. Here, we report a panel of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies isolated using the linking B cell receptor to antigen specificity through sequencing (LIBRA-seq) technology from an individual who recovered from COVID-19. Of these antibodies, 54042-4 shows potent neutralization against authentic SARS-CoV-2 viruses, including variants of concern (VOCs). A cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of 54042-4 in complex with the SARS-CoV-2 spike reveals an epitope composed of residues that are highly conserved in currently circulating SARS-CoV-2 lineages. Further, 54042-4 possesses uncommon genetic and structural characteristics that distinguish it from other potently neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. Together, these findings provide motivation for the development of 54042-4 as a lead candidate to counteract current and future SARS-CoV-2 VOCs.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitope Mapping/methods , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/chemistry , Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells
12.
Bioorg Chem ; 116: 105362, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432980

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a serious threat to global health. One attractive antiviral target is the membrane fusion mechanism employed by the virus to gain access to the host cell. Here we report a robust protein-based fluorescent polarization assay, that mimicking the formation of the six-helix bundle (6-HB) process during the membrane fusion, for the evaluation and screening of SARS-CoV-2 fusion Inhibitors. The IC50 of known inhibitors, HR2P, EK1, and Salvianolic acid C (Sal-C) were measured to be 6.1 nM, 2.5 nM, and 8.9 µM respectively. In addition, we found Sal-A has a slightly lower IC50 (3.9 µM) than Sal-C. Interestingly, simple caffeic acid can also disrupt the formation of 6-HB with a sub-mM concentration. Pilot high throughput screening (HTS) of a small marine natural product library validates the assay with a Z' factor close to 0.8. We envision the current assay provides a convenient way to screen SARS-CoV-2 fusion inhibitors and assess their binding affinity.


Subject(s)
Alkenes/analysis , Antiviral Agents/analysis , Fluorescence Polarization , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Peptides/analysis , Polyphenols/analysis , Alkenes/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Humans , Molecular Structure , Peptides/pharmacology , Polyphenols/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
13.
Molecules ; 26(18)2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430926

ABSTRACT

Sample preparation is an essential step for nearly every type of biochemical analysis in use today. Among the most important of these analyses is the diagnosis of diseases, since their treatment may rely greatly on time and, in the case of infectious diseases, containing their spread within a population to prevent outbreaks. To address this, many different methods have been developed for use in the wide variety of settings for which they are needed. In this work, we have reviewed the literature and report on a broad range of methods that have been developed in recent years and their applications to point-of-care (POC), high-throughput screening, and low-resource and traditional clinical settings for diagnosis, including some of those that were developed in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In addition to covering alternative approaches and improvements to traditional sample preparation techniques such as extractions and separations, techniques that have been developed with focuses on integration with smart devices, laboratory automation, and biosensors are also discussed.


Subject(s)
High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Specimen Handling/methods , Biosensing Techniques/methods , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , High-Throughput Screening Assays/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Point-of-Care Systems/trends , Point-of-Care Testing/trends , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17793, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397895

ABSTRACT

The rapid identification and isolation of infected individuals remains a key strategy for controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Frequent testing of populations to detect infection early in asymptomatic or presymptomatic individuals can be a powerful tool for intercepting transmission, especially when the viral prevalence is low. However, RT-PCR testing-the gold standard of SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis-is expensive, making regular testing of every individual unfeasible. Sample pooling is one approach to lowering costs. By combining samples and testing them in groups the number of tests required is reduced, substantially lowering costs. Here we report on the implementation of pooling strategies using 3-d and 4-d hypercubes to test a professional sports team in South Africa. We have shown that infected samples can be reliably detected in groups of 27 and 81, with minimal loss of assay sensitivity for samples with individual Ct values of up to 32. We report on the automation of sample pooling, using a liquid-handling robot and an automated web interface to identify positive samples. We conclude that hypercube pooling allows for the reliable RT-PCR detection of SARS-CoV-2 infection, at significantly lower costs than lateral flow antigen (LFA) tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Specimen Handling/methods , Antigens, Viral/isolation & purification , Athletes , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/economics , COVID-19 Serological Testing/economics , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Cost Savings , High-Throughput Screening Assays/economics , Humans , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity , South Africa , Specimen Handling/economics , Sports Medicine/economics , Sports Medicine/methods
15.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0248444, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394535

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 is rapidly expanding across the world. A positive result of antibody tests suggests that the individual has potentially been exposed to SARS-CoV-2, thus allowing to identify asymptomatic infections and determine the seroprevalence in a given population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performances of a newly developed high throughput immunoassay for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM antibody detection on the Luminex MAGPIX platform. Clinical agreement studies were performed in 42 COVID-19 patient serum samples and 162 negative donor serum/plasma samples. Positive percent agreement (PPA) was 42.86% (95% CI: 9.90% to 81.59%), 71.43% (95% CI: 29.04% to 96.33%), and 28.57% (95% CI: 13.22% to 48.67%) for samples collected on 0-7 days, 8-14 days, and 2-8 weeks from symptom onset, respectively. Negative Percent Agreement (NPA) was 97.53% (95% CI: 93.80% to 99.32%). There was no cross-reactivity with the SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody. Hemoglobin (200 mg/dL), bilirubin (2 mg/dL), triglyceride (250 mg/dL) and EDTA (10 mM) showed no significant interfering effect on this assay. In conclusion, an anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM antibody assay with high sensitivity and specificity has been developed. With the high throughput, this assay will speed up the anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM testing.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Immunoassay/methods , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Microspheres , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
16.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 218, 2020 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387198

Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Cardiac Glycosides/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/pharmacology , Bufanolides/chemistry , Bufanolides/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cardiac Glycosides/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chloroquine/chemistry , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Digoxin/chemistry , Digoxin/pharmacology , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pandemics , Phenanthrenes/chemistry , Phenanthrenes/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/antagonists & inhibitors , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
17.
Chem Commun (Camb) ; 57(12): 1430-1433, 2021 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387498

ABSTRACT

The main viral protease (Mpro) of SARS-CoV-2 is a nucleophilic cysteine hydrolase and a current target for anti-viral chemotherapy. We describe a high-throughput solid phase extraction coupled to mass spectrometry Mpro assay. The results reveal some ß-lactams, including penicillin esters, are active site reacting Mpro inhibitors, thus highlighting the potential of acylating agents for Mpro inhibition.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/drug effects , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , beta-Lactams/pharmacology , Acylation , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , beta-Lactams/chemistry
18.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4396, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387353

ABSTRACT

Rapid development of antisense therapies can enable on-demand responses to new viral pathogens and make personalized medicine for genetic diseases practical. Antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) are promising candidates to fill such a role, but their challenging synthesis limits their widespread application. To rapidly prototype potential PMO drug candidates, we report a fully automated flow-based oligonucleotide synthesizer. Our optimized synthesis platform reduces coupling times by up to 22-fold compared to previously reported methods. We demonstrate the power of our automated technology with the synthesis of milligram quantities of three candidate therapeutic PMO sequences for an unserved class of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To further test our platform, we synthesize a PMO that targets the genomic mRNA of SARS-CoV-2 and demonstrate its antiviral effects. This platform could find broad application not only in designing new SARS-CoV-2 and DMD antisense therapeutics, but also for rapid development of PMO candidates to treat new and emerging diseases.


Subject(s)
Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic/instrumentation , Chemistry, Pharmaceutical/instrumentation , High-Throughput Screening Assays/instrumentation , Morpholinos/chemical synthesis , Oligonucleotides, Antisense/chemical synthesis , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/drug therapy , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/microbiology , Disease Models, Animal , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Humans , Morpholinos/pharmacology , Morpholinos/therapeutic use , Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne/drug therapy , Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne/genetics , Oligonucleotides, Antisense/pharmacology , Oligonucleotides, Antisense/therapeutic use , Precision Medicine/methods , RNA, Messenger/antagonists & inhibitors , RNA, Viral/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Time Factors , Vero Cells
19.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3201, 2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387343

ABSTRACT

Fragment-based drug design has introduced a bottom-up process for drug development, with improved sampling of chemical space and increased effectiveness in early drug discovery. Here, we combine the use of pharmacophores, the most general concept of representing drug-target interactions with the theory of protein hotspots, to develop a design protocol for fragment libraries. The SpotXplorer approach compiles small fragment libraries that maximize the coverage of experimentally confirmed binding pharmacophores at the most preferred hotspots. The efficiency of this approach is demonstrated with a pilot library of 96 fragment-sized compounds (SpotXplorer0) that is validated on popular target classes and emerging drug targets. Biochemical screening against a set of GPCRs and proteases retrieves compounds containing an average of 70% of known pharmacophores for these targets. More importantly, SpotXplorer0 screening identifies confirmed hits against recently established challenging targets such as the histone methyltransferase SETD2, the main protease (3CLPro) and the NSP3 macrodomain of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/chemistry , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Drug Development/methods , Drug Discovery/methods , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/chemistry , Animals , Cell Survival , Chlorocebus aethiops , Computational Chemistry , Crystallography, X-Ray , Databases, Protein , Drug Design , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Hydrogen Bonding , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , Ligands , Protein Binding , Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Small Molecule Libraries , Vero Cells
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17234, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376209

ABSTRACT

Over the past two decades, there has been a great interest in the study of HLA-E-restricted αß T cells during bacterial and viral infections, including recently SARS-CoV-2 infection. Phenotyping of these specific HLA-E-restricted T cells requires new tools such as tetramers for rapid cell staining or sorting, as well as for the identification of new peptides capable to bind to the HLA-E pocket. To this aim, we have developed an optimal photosensitive peptide to generate stable HLA-E/pUV complexes allowing high-throughput production of new HLA-E/peptide complexes by peptide exchange. We characterized the UV exchange by ELISA and improved the peptide exchange readout using size exclusion chromatography. This novel approach for complex quantification is indeed very important to perform tetramerization of MHC/peptide complexes with the high quality required for detection of specific T cells. Our approach allows the rapid screening of peptides capable of binding to the non-classical human HLA-E allele, paving the way for the development of new therapeutic approaches based on the detection of HLA-E-restricted T cells.


Subject(s)
Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Major Histocompatibility Complex/immunology , Peptides/chemistry , Amino Acid Sequence , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Humans , Immunologic Techniques , Photochemical Processes , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology
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