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2.
OMICS ; 26(11): 586-588, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097272

ABSTRACT

In this perspective analysis, we strive to answer the following question: how can we advance integrative biology research in the 21st century with lessons from animal science? At the University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Animal Science, we share here our three lessons learned in the two decades from 2002 to 2022 that we believe could inform integrative biology, systems science, and animal science scholarship in other countries and geographies. Cultivating multiomics knowledge through a conceptual lens of integrative biology is crucial for life sciences research that can stand the test of diverse biological, clinical, and ecological contexts. Moreover, in an era of the current COVID-19 pandemic, animal nutrition and animal science, and the study of their interactions with human health (and vice versa) through integrative biology approaches hold enormous prospects and significance for systems medicine and ecosystem health.


Subject(s)
Biological Science Disciplines , COVID-19 , Animals , Humans , History, 21st Century , Ecosystem , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Biology
3.
JAMA ; 328(13): 1295-1296, 2022 10 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2074835

ABSTRACT

In this Viewpoint, Lauren Gardner, winner of the 2022 Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award for creating the COVID-19 Dashboard, discusses the development of the Dashboard and the factors that contributed to its success.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , COVID-19 , Global Health , Pandemics , Public Health Surveillance , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health/history , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Time Factors , United States/epidemiology
4.
Science ; 377(6611): 1137-1138, 2022 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063971
5.
Science ; 378(6615): 17-21, 2022 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053099

ABSTRACT

With rigorous science and good-humored braggadocio, Tulio de Oliveira champions coronavirus research from the Global South.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computational Biology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Brazil , COVID-19/history , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/history , History, 21st Century , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA/history , South Africa
6.
Nat Microbiol ; 6(12): 1467-1468, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1663977
11.
J Clin Oncol ; 39(27): 3083-3084, 2021 09 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883562
12.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(5): 1629-1647, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1853690

ABSTRACT

The mission of translational science is to bring predictivity and efficiency to the development and dissemination of interventions that improve human health. Ten years ago this year, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences was founded to embody, conduct, and support this new discipline. The Center's first decade has brought substantial progress across a broad range of translational areas, from diagnostic and drug development to clinical trials to implementation science to education. The origins of the translational science and advances to this point are reviewed here and allow the establishment of an ambitious future research agenda for the field.


Subject(s)
/trends , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/history , National Institutes of Health (U.S.)/organization & administration , /organization & administration , United States
14.
J Cell Biol ; 221(3)2022 03 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795409

ABSTRACT

Bo Zhong studies the regulation of the antiviral innate immunity, inflammation, and tumorigenesis by the protein ubiquitination system.


Subject(s)
Allergy and Immunology/history , Immunity, Innate , Ubiquitination , Virology/history , Animals , China , History, 21st Century , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans
15.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0261114, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793548

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19-pandemic forced many countries to close schools abruptly in the spring of 2020. These school closures and the subsequent period of distance learning has led to concerns about increasing inequality in education, as children from lower-educated and poorer families have less access to (additional) resources at home. This study analyzes differences in declines in learning gains in primary education in the Netherlands for reading, spelling and math, using rich data on standardized test scores and register data on student and parental background for almost 300,000 unique students. The results show large inequalities in the learning loss based on parental education and parental income, on top of already existing inequalities. The results call for a national focus on interventions specifically targeting vulnerable students.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/trends , Socioeconomic Factors/history , Teaching/trends , Academic Failure/trends , Academic Success , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Educational Status , History, 21st Century , Humans , Income , Learning , Netherlands , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , School Teachers , Schools/trends , Students
16.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264355, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793517

ABSTRACT

The supply chain disruptions caused by the COVID-19 outbreak have led to changes in food prices globally. The impact of COVID-19 on the price of essential and perishable food items in developing and emerging economies has been lacking. Using a recent phone survey by the World Bank, this study examines the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the prices of the three essential food items in India. The results indicate that price of basic food items such as atta (wheat flour) and rice increased significantly during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period. In contrast, during the same period, the price of onions declined significantly. The findings may suggest panic-buying, hoarding, and storability of food items. The results further reveal that remittance income and cash transfers from the government negatively affected commodity prices. Thus, this study's findings suggest that families may have shifted the demand away from essential foods during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Commerce/statistics & numerical data , Food/economics , Commerce/trends , Flour/economics , Food/statistics & numerical data , Food Storage/statistics & numerical data , Food Supply/economics , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , History, 21st Century , Humans , Income , India/epidemiology , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Triticum
17.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264534, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793513

ABSTRACT

The lessening of food wastage, specifically among nations where about half of its worldwide quantity is produced, has turned to be a mammoth challenge for environmental, social and economic sustainability, and represents one of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) within the Agenda 2030. The quantity of food being thrown away in spite of being in an edible condition has become alarming in middle and high income countries. The COVID-19 lockdown strategy, both at local and international levels, has expressively altered work, life and food consumption behaviors globally, directing to food wastage as a multi sectoral issue. Pakistan has no exception to such manifestations. The main objective of this study is to analyze the perceptions of rural people of Pakistan regarding food wastage during the COVID-19 pandemic. To evaluate whether behavior about food wastage among rural households varied or not during the pandemic, a descriptive survey was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire and 963 responses were selected for further empirical investigations. The findings of the study reveal that food waste actually decreased in spite of an increased amount of purchased food during the lockdown. Our results highlight that the effect of the pandemic has led to reduction in food wastage among rural respondents, an increased consciousness for the morals of food waste, and awareness of environmental impacts of food wastage. The conclusions of this study highlight that rural consumers of Pakistan are emerging with a new level of responsiveness about food wastage with possible positive impact on the environment in terms of decreased greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and other pollutants. The study findings imply that this pandemic time provides a suitable window to raise awareness about food wastage among rural as well as urban households while contemplating effective strategies to overcome the issue of food wastage in the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Consumer Behavior , Food Security , Refuse Disposal , Adult , Consumer Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Female , Food/statistics & numerical data , Food Security/statistics & numerical data , Food Supply/statistics & numerical data , History, 21st Century , Humans , Male , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Perception/physiology , Refuse Disposal/statistics & numerical data , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264644, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793511

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with high-consequence infectious diseases (HCID) are rare in Western Europe. However, high-level isolation units (HLIU) must always be prepared for patient admission. Case fatality rates of HCID can be reduced by providing optimal intensive care management. We here describe a single centre's preparation, its embedding in the national context and the challenges we faced during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. METHODS: Ten team leaders organize monthly whole day trainings for a team of doctors and nurses from the HLIU focusing on intensive care medicine. Impact and relevance of training are assessed by a questionnaire and a perception survey, respectively. Furthermore, yearly exercises with several partner institutions are performed to cover different real-life scenarios. Exercises are evaluated by internal and external observers. Both training sessions and exercises are accompanied by intense feedback. RESULTS: From May 2017 monthly training sessions were held with a two-month and a seven-month break due to the first and second wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, respectively. Agreement with the statements of the questionnaire was higher after training compared to before training indicating a positive effect of training sessions on competence. Participants rated joint trainings for nurses and doctors at regular intervals as important. Numerous issues with potential for improvement were identified during post processing of exercises. Action plans for their improvement were drafted and as of now mostly implemented. The network of the permanent working group of competence and treatment centres for HCID (Ständiger Arbeitskreis der Kompetenz- und Behandlungszentren für Krankheiten durch hochpathogene Erreger (STAKOB)) at the Robert Koch-Institute (RKI) was strengthened throughout the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Adequate preparation for the admission of patients with HCID is challenging. We show that joint regular trainings of doctors and nurses are appreciated and that training sessions may improve perceived skills. We also show that real-life scenario exercises may reveal additional deficits, which cannot be easily disclosed in training sessions. Although the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic interfered with our activities the enhanced cooperation among German HLIU during the pandemic ensured constant readiness for the admission of HCID patients to our or to collaborating HLIU. This is a single centre's experience, which may not be generalized to other centres. However, we believe that our work may address aspects that should be considered when preparing a unit for the admission of patients with HCID. These may then be adapted to the local situations.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/methods , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Environment Design , Germany/epidemiology , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Isolation/methods , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Workflow
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