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1.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 57-63, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) programs and people with CF (PwCF) employed various monitoring methods for virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper characterizes experiences with remote monitoring across the U.S. CF community. METHODS: The CF Foundation (CFF) sponsored distribution of home spirometers (April 2020 to May 2021), surveys to PwCF and CF programs (July to September 2020), and a second program survey (April to May 2021). We used mixed methods to explore access, use, and perspectives regarding the use of remote monitoring in future care. RESULTS: By October 2020, 13,345 spirometers had been distributed, and 19,271 spirometers by May 2021. Programs (n=286) estimated proportions of PwCF with home devices increased over seven months: spirometers (30% to 70%), scales (50% to 70%), oximeters (5% to 10%) with higher estimates in adult programs for spirometers and oximeters. PwCF (n=378) had access to scales (89%), followed by oximeters (48%) and spirometers (47%), often using scales and oximeters weekly, and spirometers monthly. Over both surveys, some programs had no method to collect respiratory specimens for cultures associated with telehealth visits (47%, n=132; 41%, n=118). Most programs (81%) had a process for phlebotomy associated with a telehealth visit, primarily through off-site labs. Both PwCF and programs felt future care should advance remote monitoring and recommended improvements for access, training, and data collection systems. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF and programs experienced unprecedented access to remote monitoring and raised its importance for future care. Improvements to current systems may leverage these shared experiences to augment future care models.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Equipment and Supplies/supply & distribution , Home Care Services , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Spirometry , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/standards , Humans , Models, Organizational , Needs Assessment , Oximetry/instrumentation , Oximetry/methods , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry/instrumentation , Spirometry/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
2.
Fam Pract ; 38(5): 549-555, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Virtual consults have replaced in-person visits for many home-isolated patients with COVID-19 disease. OBJECTIVES: To describe the natural history, clinical management and outcomes of community-dwelling patients with COVID-19, who received support from a family medicine-led, virtual CovidCare@Home program in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. METHODS: Observational, descriptive study conducted by retrospective chart review of 98 patients enrolled during the first 5 weeks of program implementation (8 April-11 May 2020); 73 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, with symptom onset ≤ 14 days before initial consult were included for analysis. Patients were classified as mild, moderate or severe based on WHO Criteria. RESULTS: All patients in the program experienced mild (88%) or moderate (12.3%) disease. No patients were hospitalized or died. Patients were mainly female (70%); with mean age of 43.3 years. Most patients (82.2%) worked in higher risk, healthcare settings. Almost 40% had no medical co-morbidities. Common symptoms were cough (65.8%), fatigue (60.3%), headache (42.5%) and myalgia (39.7%), followed by fever (32.9%), sore throat (21.9%), nasal congestion (21.9%) and rhinorrhea (20.5%). Headache (51%) and anosmia (45.1%) were common among females; fever and breathlessness among males (40.9%). Nine patients (12.3%) experienced worsening of symptoms (mainly respiratory) or exacerbation of co-morbidities, which required care outside the virtual service. CONCLUSION: Patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 disease can be managed safely and effectively in a family medicine-led virtual program. Some sex differences in symptoms were observed. Future work should focus on long-term follow up in view of the existence of so-called 'long-haulers'.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Symptom Assessment , Telemedicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 587146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574304

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a fast spreading virus leading to the development of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). Severe and critical cases are characterized by damage to the respiratory system, endothelial inflammation, and multiple organ failure triggered by an excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines, culminating in the high number of deaths all over the world. Sedentarism induces worse, continuous, and progressive consequences to health. On the other hand, physical activity provides benefits to health and improves low-grade systemic inflammation. The aim of this review is to elucidate the effects of physical activity in physical fitness, immune defense, and its contribution to mitigate the severe inflammatory response mediated by SARS-CoV-2. Physical exercise is an effective therapeutic strategy to mitigate the consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this sense, studies have shown that acute physical exercise induces the production of myokines that are secreted in tissues and into the bloodstream, supporting its systemic modulatory effect. Therefore, maintaining physical activity influence balance the immune system and increases immune vigilance, and also might promote potent effects against the consequences of infectious diseases and chronic diseases associated with the development of severe forms of COVID-19. Protocols to maintain exercise practice are suggested and have been strongly established, such as home-based exercise (HBE) and outdoor-based exercise (OBE). In this regard, HBE might help to reduce levels of physical inactivity, bed rest, and sitting time, impacting on adherence to physical activity, promoting all the benefits related to exercise, and attracting patients in different stages of treatment for COVID-19. In parallel, OBE must improve health, but also prevent and mitigate COVID-19 severe outcomes in all populations. In conclusion, HBE or OBE models can be a potent strategy to mitigate the progress of infection, and a coadjutant therapy for COVID-19 at all ages and different chronic conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Exercise , Healthy Lifestyle , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sedentary Behavior , Animals , Home Care Services , Humans , Physical Fitness , Social Isolation
4.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 355-362, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513256

ABSTRACT

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and viral pneumonia in pediatrics worldwide. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the prevalence of RSV is 23.5% in pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract illness. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) poses critical public health and socioeconomic challenges in KSA. The Saudi Pediatric Pulmonology Association (SPPA), a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society (STS), developed a task force to determine the potential challenges and barriers to the RSV immunoprophylaxis program during the era of COVID-19 and to compose a practical, nationwide, and multidisciplinary approach to address these challenges. Some of the recommendations to manage these challenges include increasing the number of RSV immunoprophylaxis clinics, drive-thru visits, home-care services, and swift referrals to the RSV immunoprophylaxis program specialists. Additional training is required for healthcare personnel to add RSV immunoprophylaxis to the regular immunization schedule.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bronchiolitis, Viral/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Immunization Programs/methods , Palivizumab/therapeutic use , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Advisory Committees , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Home Care Services , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Injections , Pulmonary Medicine , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , Societies, Medical
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512302

ABSTRACT

Studies of the characteristics of informal caregivers and associated factors have focused on care-receiver disease or caregiver social and psychological traits; however, an integral description may provide better understanding of informal caregivers' problems. A multicenter cross-sectional study in primary healthcare centers was performed in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were a random sample of informal caregivers of patients in a home-care program. Primary outcomes were health-related quality of life and caregiver burden, and related factors were sociodemographic data, clinical and risk factors, social support and social characteristics, use of healthcare services, and care receivers' status. In total, 104 informal caregivers were included (mean age 68.25 years); 81.73% were female, 54.81% were retired, 58.65% had high comorbidity, and 48.08% of care receivers had severe dependence. Adjusted multivariate regression models showed health-related quality of life and the caregivers' burden were affected by comorbidity, age, time of care, and dependency of care receiver, while social support and depression also showed relative importance. Aging, chronic diseases, and comorbidity should be included when explaining informal caregivers' health status and wellbeing. The effectiveness of interventions to support informal caregivers should comprehensively evaluate caregivers when designing programs, centering interventions on informal caregivers and not care receivers' conditions.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Home Care Services , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Primary Health Care , Quality of Life
6.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 255(1): 61-69, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496649

ABSTRACT

North Italy emerged as an epicenter of COVID-19 in the Western world. The majority of studies of patients with COVID-19 have focused on hospitalized patients, and data on early outpatient treatment are limited. This research retrospectively examines consecutive symptomatic adults who did not present to a hospital but who experience laboratory confirmed (nasopharyngeal swabs) or probable COVID-19 infection. From March 12 to April 12, 2020, 124 consecutive patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection (84%) or with epidemiologically linked exposure to a person with confirmed infection (16%) were managed at home. The diagnosis of pneumonia was made with a portable ultrasound. COVID-19 treatment was based on low-dose hydroxychloroquine with or without darunavir/cobicistat or azithromycin and enoxaparine for bedridden patients. The patients were monitored by telemedicine. The primary endpoints were clinical improvement or hospitalization, and the secondary endpoints were mortality at day 30 and at day 60. Forty-seven (37.9%) patients had mild COVID-19 infection, 44 (35.5%) had moderate COVID-19 infection, and 33 (26.6%) had severe COVID-19 infection. Four patients (3.2%) were hospitalized and there were no deaths at day 30 and at day 60. Only mild side effects were reported. Early home treatment of COVID-19 patients resulted in a low hospitalization rate with no deaths, with the limitations of the small sample size and that it was conducted within a single geographic area. We believe that this model may be easily reproduced in both cities and rural areas around the world to treat COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Cobicistat/therapeutic use , Darunavir/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Female , Home Care Services , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Telemedicine , Young Adult
7.
BMJ ; 375: n2593, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495418

ABSTRACT

The studyBarker KL, Room J, Knight R, et al. Outpatient physiotherapy versus home-based rehabilitation for patients at risk of poor outcomes after knee arthroplasty: CORKA RCT. Health Technol Assess 2020;24:1-116.To read the full NIHR Alert, go to: https://evidence.nihr.ac.uk/alert/knee-replacements-home-based-rehabilitation-as-effective-physiotherapy/.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/rehabilitation , Home Care Services , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Physical Therapy Modalities , Standard of Care , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Home Care Services/economics , Humans , Physical Therapy Modalities/economics , Standard of Care/economics , Treatment Outcome
8.
J Emerg Med ; 60(5): e138-e139, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492252
9.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(4): 258-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475897

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Home hospital care (HHC) is a new and exciting concept that holds the promise of achieving all three components of the Triple Aim and reducing health disparities. As an innovative care delivery model, HHC substitutes traditional inpatient hospital care with hospital care at home for older patients with certain conditions. Studies have shown evidence of reduced cost of care, improved patient satisfaction, and enhanced quality and safety of care for patients treated through this model. The steady growth in Medicare Advantage enrollment and the expansion in 2020 of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospitals Without Walls program to include acute hospital care at home creates an opportunity for hospitals to implement such programs and be financially rewarded for reducing costs. Capacity constraints exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic suggest that now is the ideal time for healthcare leaders to test and advance the concept of HHC in their communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing/economics , Critical Care Nursing/standards , Healthcare Disparities/standards , Home Care Services/economics , Home Care Services/standards , Quality of Health Care/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Healthcare Disparities/economics , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Quality of Health Care/economics , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470873

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients are exposed to a greater risk of COVID-19 infection, resulting in treatment delays and unnecessary hospitalizations. International authorities have suggested reducing visits to hospitals and guarantee continuity of care. We developed a home care project called Home Se-Cure (HSC) to guarantee the continuity of oral, intramuscular, and subcutaneous cancer therapy during COVID-19. The Home Se-Cure project included cancer patients living near Galliera Hospital. Patients received home visits by registered nurses (RNs), whoperformed blood tests and delivered cancer therapies. Patients were instructed to take drugs after blood test results and therapy confirmation by oncologists. Sixty-six patients decided to participate and 38 declined the service. A customer satisfaction questionnaire was administered to a subgroup of patients participating in the project. The most prevalent disease in the HSC group was prostate cancer. The mean age of the patients in HSC was 78.4 years and 68.9 in the decliner group. The majority of the HSC participants appreciated the project because they could stay at home (71%) and reduce the risk of COVID-19 contagion (67.7%). Compared to decliners, the time the study group saved was 2033 hours. HSC guaranteed the continuity of care during the COVID-19 pandemic by reducing the number of patients in the hospital and avoiding crowds in the waiting room.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Nurs Open ; 8(6): 3190-3200, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460256

ABSTRACT

AIM: To examine how work community factors are related to occupational well-being and work ability, and how occupational well-being is related to work ability. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted among home care workers in one municipality in Finland. METHODS: A self-administered survey on work and well-being was filled out by 167 employees working two shifts in 2019. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the association between work community factors, occupational well-being and work ability. RESULTS: The only work community factor directly affecting Occupational well-being was Information and work organization; the effect of the other two factors, Social support and Influence on work shifts, was indirect. All work community factors indirectly affected Work ability. Home care should emphasize information provision and work organization with optimal time use. This requires social support, a well-functioning work atmosphere and providing employees with opportunities for influence and participation.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services , Home Health Aides , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Work Capacity Evaluation
13.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1055, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home care (HC) services are crucial to the health and social wellbeing of older adults, people with disabilities, and the chronically ill. Although the HC sector is growing rapidly in the USA, there is high job turnover among the HC aide workforce. HC provides an important alternative to facility-based care, yet it has often been overlooked within the larger health care system: most recently, in COVID-19 pandemic planning. The objective of the study was to characterize qualitatively the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on three key HC stakeholders: clients, aides, and agency managers. METHODS: The study included 37 phone interviews conducted during April - November 2020: HC clients (n = 9), aides (n = 16), and agency managers (n = 12). All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Qualitative analysis of the transcripts followed the grounded theory approach. The interview transcriptions were coded line-by-line into hierarchical themes with NVivo 12 software which allowed weighting of themes based on the number of interviews where they were coded. RESULTS: Fear of infection and transmission among HC clients and aides were strong themes. Infection prevention and control became the top priority guiding day-to-day business operations at agencies; sourcing adequate personal protective equipment for staff was the most urgent task. HC aides expressed concerns for their clients who showed signs of depression, due to increased isolation during the pandemic. The disappearance of comforting touch - resulting from physical distancing practices - altered the expression of compassion in the HC aide-client care relationship. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that the pandemic has further increased psychosocial job demands of HC aides. Increased isolation of clients may be contributing to a wider public health problem of elder loneliness and depression. To support the HC stakeholders during the on-going COVID-19 pandemic, for future pandemic planning or other health emergencies, it is important to improve HC aide job retention. This action could also ease the serious care services shortage among the growing population of older adults.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Home Health Aides , Aged , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(6): 1695-1697, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455580
15.
Br J Gen Pract ; 71(711): 462-463, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450866
17.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(11): 2258-2262.e1, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440152

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted use of home care services for individuals with dementia across service types and sociodemographic strata. DESIGN: Population-based time series analysis. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling adults with dementia in Ontario, Canada, from January 2019 to September 2020. METHODS: We used health administrative databases (Ontario Registered Persons Database and Home Care Database) to measure home care services used by participants. Poisson regression models were fit to compare weekly rates of home care services during the pandemic to historical trends with rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) stratified by service type (nursing, personal care, therapy), sex, rurality, and neighborhood income quintile. RESULTS: During the first wave of the pandemic, personal care fell by 16% compared to historical levels (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.84, 0.85) and therapies fell by 50% (RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.48, 0.52), whereas nursing did not significantly decline (RR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00, 1.04). All rates had recovered by September 2020, with nursing and therapies higher than historical levels. Changes in services were largely consistent across sociodemographic strata, although the rural population experienced a larger decline in personal care and smaller rebound in nursing. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Personal care and therapies for individuals with dementia were interrupted during the early months of the pandemic, whereas nursing was only minimally impacted. Pandemic responses with the potential to disrupt home care for individuals living with dementia must balance the impacts on individuals with dementia, caregivers, and providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Home Care Services , Adult , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Independent Living , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 962, 2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430421

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The need for home care workers (HCWs) is rapidly growing in Norway due to the increasingly growing elderly population. HCWs are exposed to a number of occupational hazards and physically demanding work tasks. Musculoskeletal disorders, stress, exhaustion, high sick leave rates and a high probability of being granted a disability pension are common challenges. This qualitative study explored the views of HCWs on how working conditions affect their safety, health, and wellbeing. METHODS: A descriptive and explorative design was utilised using semi-structured individual interviews with eight HCWs from three home care units in a middle-sized Norwegian city. Interviews were conducted in the Norwegian language, audio-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. The data was analysed by systematic text condensation. Key data quotes were translated into English by the authors. RESULTS: HCWs reported that meaningful work-related interactions and relationships contributed to their improved wellbeing. Challenging interactions, such as verbal violence by consumers, were deemed stressful. The unpredictable work conditions HCWs encounter in users' homes contributed to their exposure to environmental hazards and unhealthy physical workloads. This was the case, although the employer promoted ergonomic work practices such as ergonomic body mechanics when mobilising and handling of clients, using safe patient handling equipment. HCWs perceived high level of individual responsibility for complying with company safety policies and practices, representing a health barrier for some. Organisational frameworks created unhealthy work conditions by shift work, time pressure and staffing challenges. Performing tasks in accordance with HCWs professional skills and identity was perceived as health-promoting. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that unpredictable working conditions at users' home can adversely affect the safety, health, and wellbeing of HCWs. The interaction between the unpredictable environment at users' homes, HCWs' perceived high level of individual responsibility for complying with company safety policies and practices, and staffing challenges due to sickness-related absences upon the workplace creates tense work conditions with a negative influence on HCWs health.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services , Home Health Aides , Occupational Health , Aged , Humans , Qualitative Research , Workplace
19.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 464-474, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429159

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe the development of a protocol and practical tool for the safe delivery of telemental health (TMH) services to the home. The COVID-19 pandemic forced providers to rapidly transition their outpatient practices to home-based TMH (HB-TMH) without existing protocols or tools to guide them. This experience underscored the need for a standardized privacy and safety tool as HB-TMH is expected to continue as a resource during future crises as well as to become a component of the routine mental health care landscape. Methods: The authors represent a subset of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Telemental Health Consortium. They met weekly through videoconferencing to review published safety standards of care, existing TMH guidelines for clinic-based and home-based services, and their own institutional protocols. They agreed on three domains foundational to the delivery of HB-TMH: environmental safety, clinical safety, and disposition planning. Through multiple iterations, they agreed upon a final Privacy and Safety Protocol for HB-TMH. The protocol was then operationalized into the Privacy and Safety Assessment Tool (PSA Tool) based on two keystone medical safety constructs: the World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist/Time-Out and the Checklist Manifesto. Results: The PSA Tool comprised four modules: (1) Screening for Safety for HB-TMH; (2) Assessment for Safety During the HB-TMH Initial Visit; (3) End of the Initial Visit and Disposition Planning; and (4) the TMH Time-Out and Reassessment during subsequent visits. A sample workflow guides implementation. Conclusions: The Privacy and Safety Protocol and PSA Tool aim to prepare providers for the private and safe delivery of HB-TMH. Its modular format can be adapted to each site's resources. Going forward, the PSA Tool should help to facilitate the integration of HB-TMH into the routine mental health care landscape.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Health Services/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Child Health Services/organization & administration , Clinical Protocols/standards , Home Care Services , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Patient Safety , Privacy , Telemedicine , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Computer Communication Networks/standards , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Home Care Services/ethics , Home Care Services/standards , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/ethics , Telemedicine/methods , United States
20.
Rev Infirm ; 70(274): 40-41, 2021 Oct.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415758

ABSTRACT

An evaluation of professional practices was carried out in a cancer centre in the wake of the management of the health crisis linked to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic. Hospital teams questioned the relevance of the measures adopted, internally and during home care, to manage suspected or confirmed Covid-19 patients and prevent contagion for all.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Humans , Pandemics , Professional Practice , SARS-CoV-2
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