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1.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 57-63, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) programs and people with CF (PwCF) employed various monitoring methods for virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper characterizes experiences with remote monitoring across the U.S. CF community. METHODS: The CF Foundation (CFF) sponsored distribution of home spirometers (April 2020 to May 2021), surveys to PwCF and CF programs (July to September 2020), and a second program survey (April to May 2021). We used mixed methods to explore access, use, and perspectives regarding the use of remote monitoring in future care. RESULTS: By October 2020, 13,345 spirometers had been distributed, and 19,271 spirometers by May 2021. Programs (n=286) estimated proportions of PwCF with home devices increased over seven months: spirometers (30% to 70%), scales (50% to 70%), oximeters (5% to 10%) with higher estimates in adult programs for spirometers and oximeters. PwCF (n=378) had access to scales (89%), followed by oximeters (48%) and spirometers (47%), often using scales and oximeters weekly, and spirometers monthly. Over both surveys, some programs had no method to collect respiratory specimens for cultures associated with telehealth visits (47%, n=132; 41%, n=118). Most programs (81%) had a process for phlebotomy associated with a telehealth visit, primarily through off-site labs. Both PwCF and programs felt future care should advance remote monitoring and recommended improvements for access, training, and data collection systems. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF and programs experienced unprecedented access to remote monitoring and raised its importance for future care. Improvements to current systems may leverage these shared experiences to augment future care models.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Equipment and Supplies/supply & distribution , Home Care Services , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Spirometry , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/standards , Humans , Models, Organizational , Needs Assessment , Oximetry/instrumentation , Oximetry/methods , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry/instrumentation , Spirometry/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
2.
J Healthc Manag ; 66(4): 258-270, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475897

ABSTRACT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: Home hospital care (HHC) is a new and exciting concept that holds the promise of achieving all three components of the Triple Aim and reducing health disparities. As an innovative care delivery model, HHC substitutes traditional inpatient hospital care with hospital care at home for older patients with certain conditions. Studies have shown evidence of reduced cost of care, improved patient satisfaction, and enhanced quality and safety of care for patients treated through this model. The steady growth in Medicare Advantage enrollment and the expansion in 2020 of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospitals Without Walls program to include acute hospital care at home creates an opportunity for hospitals to implement such programs and be financially rewarded for reducing costs. Capacity constraints exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic suggest that now is the ideal time for healthcare leaders to test and advance the concept of HHC in their communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing/economics , Critical Care Nursing/standards , Healthcare Disparities/standards , Home Care Services/economics , Home Care Services/standards , Quality of Health Care/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Healthcare Disparities/economics , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Quality of Health Care/economics , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
3.
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol ; 31(7): 464-474, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429159

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe the development of a protocol and practical tool for the safe delivery of telemental health (TMH) services to the home. The COVID-19 pandemic forced providers to rapidly transition their outpatient practices to home-based TMH (HB-TMH) without existing protocols or tools to guide them. This experience underscored the need for a standardized privacy and safety tool as HB-TMH is expected to continue as a resource during future crises as well as to become a component of the routine mental health care landscape. Methods: The authors represent a subset of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Telemental Health Consortium. They met weekly through videoconferencing to review published safety standards of care, existing TMH guidelines for clinic-based and home-based services, and their own institutional protocols. They agreed on three domains foundational to the delivery of HB-TMH: environmental safety, clinical safety, and disposition planning. Through multiple iterations, they agreed upon a final Privacy and Safety Protocol for HB-TMH. The protocol was then operationalized into the Privacy and Safety Assessment Tool (PSA Tool) based on two keystone medical safety constructs: the World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist/Time-Out and the Checklist Manifesto. Results: The PSA Tool comprised four modules: (1) Screening for Safety for HB-TMH; (2) Assessment for Safety During the HB-TMH Initial Visit; (3) End of the Initial Visit and Disposition Planning; and (4) the TMH Time-Out and Reassessment during subsequent visits. A sample workflow guides implementation. Conclusions: The Privacy and Safety Protocol and PSA Tool aim to prepare providers for the private and safe delivery of HB-TMH. Its modular format can be adapted to each site's resources. Going forward, the PSA Tool should help to facilitate the integration of HB-TMH into the routine mental health care landscape.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Health Services/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Child Health Services/organization & administration , Clinical Protocols/standards , Home Care Services , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Patient Safety , Privacy , Telemedicine , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Computer Communication Networks/standards , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Home Care Services/ethics , Home Care Services/standards , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/ethics , Telemedicine/methods , United States
4.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(4): 457-464, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare delivery has been significantly changed because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are vulnerable to infections because of their immunocompromised status. The risk of nosocomial infection may be reduced by providing care to patients at home. OBJECTIVES: This article describes one cancer center's approach for delivering safe patient care through homecare encounters, the benefits of home care for HSCT, and future directions. METHODS: Patients received detailed information on home encounters. Advanced practice providers visited patients daily and then returned to the clinic to formulate a plan of care with the interprofessional care team. Transplantation RNs visited patients on the same day to provide the prescribed care. FINDINGS: Based on evaluations from 32 patients and 12 providers, the results indicated that home care was safe, feasible, and beneficial for patient care post-HSCT during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/nursing , Home Care Services/standards , Neoplasms/nursing , Neoplasms/surgery , Oncology Nursing/standards , Therapies, Investigational/standards , Transplantation, Homologous/nursing , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , North Carolina , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2963-2972, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304114

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although more than seven million older adults struggle or are unable to leave their homes independently, only a small minority access home-based primary care (HBPC). Despite substantial growth of HBPC, fueled by growing evidence supporting positive patient outcomes and cost savings, the population remains dramatically underserved and many evidence gaps still exist around scope of practice and key issues in care delivery and quality. Understanding the current state of the field is critical to the delivery of high-quality home-based care. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the peer-reviewed literature on HBPC, published between January 2010 and January 2020, using Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus online libraries. All studies were evaluated by two members of the research team, and key findings were extracted. RESULTS: The initial search yielded 1730 unique studies for screening. Of these initial results, 1322 were deemed not relevant to this review. Of the 408 studies deemed potentially relevant, 79 were included in the study. Researchers identified five overarching themes: the provision of HBPC, the composition of care teams, HBPC outcomes, the role of telehealth, and emergency preparedness efforts. CONCLUSION: The need and desire for growth of HBPC has been highlighted by the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Current research on HBPC finds a diverse scope of practice, successful use of interdisciplinary teams, positive outcomes, and increasing interest in telehealth with many areas ripe for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense/standards , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Home Care Services , Primary Health Care , Telemedicine , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Needs and Demand , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/standards , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Professional Practice Gaps , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , United States
6.
Respiration ; 100(9): 909-917, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270908

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first wave of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Switzerland, confinement was imposed to limit transmission and protect vulnerable persons. These measures may have had a negative impact on perceived quality of care and symptoms in patients with chronic disorders. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether patients under long-term home noninvasive ventilation (LTHNIV) for chronic respiratory failure (CRF) were negatively affected by the 56-day confinement (March-April 2020). METHODS: A questionnaire-based survey exploring mood disturbances (HAD), symptom scores related to NIV (S3-NIV), and perception of health-care providers during confinement was sent to all patients under LTHNIV followed up by our center. Symptom scores and data obtained by ventilator software were compared between confinement and the 56 days prior to confinement. RESULTS: Of a total of 100 eligible patients, 66 were included (median age: 66 years [IQR: 53-74]): 35 (53%) with restrictive lung disorders, 20 (30%) with OHS or SRBD, and 11 (17%) with COPD or overlap syndrome. Prevalence of anxiety (n = 7; 11%) and depressive (n = 2; 3%) disorders was remarkably low. Symptom scores were slightly higher during confinement although this difference was not clinically relevant. Technical data regarding ventilation, including compliance, did not change. Patients complained of isolation and lack of social contact. They felt supported by their relatives and caregivers but complained of the lack of regular contact and information by health-care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: Patients under LTHNIV for CRF showed a remarkable resilience during the SARS-CoV-2 confinement period. Comments provided may be helpful for managing similar future health-care crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Home Care Services/standards , Noninvasive Ventilation , Respiratory Insufficiency , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Chronic Disease , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Long-Term Care/methods , Male , Mood Disorders/epidemiology , Mood Disorders/physiopathology , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Noninvasive Ventilation/statistics & numerical data , Qualitative Research , Quality of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Insufficiency/epidemiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/psychology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Switzerland/epidemiology , Symptom Assessment/methods , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data
8.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 196, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209602

ABSTRACT

The onslaught of COVID-19 pandemic has greatly overwhelmed some of the best healthcare systems in the world. Medical practitioners working in hospitals at the epicenters of COVID-19 pandemic have emphasized on the need to manage mildly ill and convalescent COVID-19 patients at home or community facilities rather than at hospitals during a pandemic. In this article, we highlight that a standardized home- and community-based (HCBC) approach for management of COVID-19 patients will be a key component for preparing hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) for a potential surge in COVID-19 cases. So far, based on the trajectory of infection, we think that SSA seems to have a window of opportunity, albeit narrowing, for implementing HCBC. However, there are challenges that will need to be addressed in order to implement and maintain HCBC. Successful implementation and maintenance of HCBC in SSA will require international agencies and key donors to work closely with the national governments; providing them with policy, technical, and financial assistance. Home- and community-based care (HCBC) is also important because it can play a role in advocacy, education, training, and health promotion during COVID-19 pandemic. We further underscore the need for a delicate balance between HCBC and hospital-based care (HBC) approach as well as with COVID-19 mitigation and suppression measures in order to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 community transmission and allow optimal continuity of the HBC. We conclude by emphasizing once again that, for countries in SSA to adequately prepare for the worst-case scenario of COVID-19 pandemic in the absence of a cure, policy makers of member states need to act collectively and fast.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Africa South of the Sahara , Community Health Services/standards , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Home Care Services/standards , Hospitalization , Humans
11.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 33(4): 62-67, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094388

ABSTRACT

This case study outlines the journey of a home-care organization to support practice change during the COVID-19 crisis. The leadership attributes and organizational structures and processes required for a nimble knowledge-to-action response are explored in relation to client screening, personal protective equipment and development of virtual care. A home and community practice lens was often not evident in the literature or guidance documents. This added complexity to the process of rapidly evaluating evidence and guidance across two provinces and issuing practice direction to a widely dispersed and mobile workforce. A cross-functional clinical response team has been invaluable in the organization's pandemic response.


Subject(s)
Community Health Services/trends , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Evidence-Based Practice/methods , Home Care Services/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Community Health Services/methods , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Evidence-Based Practice/trends , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/trends , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
12.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(5): 1307-1315, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012244

ABSTRACT

We studied the outcomes of peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients enrolled in a structured in-home walking program right before the lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic emergency, to determine whether this intervention ensured the maintenance of mobility even in the case of movement restrictions.We selectively studied 83 patients (age 72 ± 11, males n = 65) enrolled in the program within 9-month before the lockdown. The usual intervention was based on two daily 8-min sessions of slow intermittent in-home walking prescribed in circa-monthly hospital visits. During the lockdown, the program was updated by phone. Six-minute (6MWD) and pain-free walking distance (PFWD) were measured pre- and post-lockdown as well as body weight (BW), blood pressure (BP), and ankle-brachial index (ABI). Sixty-six patients were measured 117 ± 23 days after their previous visit. A safe, pain-free execution of the prescribed sessions was reported (median distance: 74 km). Overall, the 6MWD was stable, while PFWD improved (p < 0.001). The improvement was not related to age/gender, comorbidities, type of home but to the time of enrollment before lockdown. The new-entry subjects (≤ 3 months; n = 35) obtained significant improvements post-lockdown for 6MWD and PFWD, while those previously enrolled (> 3 months; n = 31) were stable. Decreased BW with stable BP and ABI values were also recorded, with better outcomes for new-entry subjects. In PAD patients, a structured walking program performed inside home and purposely guided by phone was adhered to by patients and favored mobility and risk factor control during the COVID-19 pandemic, regardless of walking ability, type of home and external conditions.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy/methods , Home Care Services/standards , Peripheral Arterial Disease/therapy , Walking/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Chi-Square Distribution , Exercise Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Rehabilitation/methods , Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Statistics, Nonparametric , Surveys and Questionnaires , Walking/statistics & numerical data
13.
Prev Med ; 145: 106409, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003148

ABSTRACT

Despite the increased burden of Covid-19 on older adults, ethical and public health frameworks lack adequate guidance for elderly patients who manage severe, even fatal, illness at home. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) recognize the heightened risks of Covid-19 for older adults; however, both organizations presuppose that most cases of Covid-19 will be mild to moderate and recoverable at home. Yet, older adults are least likely to follow this trajectory. Older patients are more susceptible to experiencing severe illness at home from which they may not recover; and if they do seek medical care, they tend to suffer worse outcomes than younger patients in intensive care settings. Given their likelihood of severe illness, worse outcomes in intensive care settings, and potential difficulty accessing resources, frail, disabled, and otherwise vulnerable older patients may face Covid-19 at home without adequate resources, information, or support for home-based care. This editorial proposes three approaches to prevent needless suffering and ensure that this vulnerable population continues to receive needed care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/nursing , Disabled Persons/statistics & numerical data , Guidelines as Topic , Home Care Services/standards , Home Nursing/standards , Vulnerable Populations/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
14.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(10): 811-822, 2020 Dec.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-971294

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is responsible for a global pandemic and many deaths. This context requires an adaptation of health systems as well as the role of each healthcare professional, including physiotherapists. STATE OF THE ART: In order to optimize the management of people with COVID-19, many savant societies published guidelines about physiotherapy interventions within the crisis but none offered a global overview from the intensive care unit to home care. Therefore, the aim of this review is to offer an overview of recommended physiotherapy interventions in order to facilitate the management of these patients, whatever the stage of the disease. PERSPECTIVES: Owing to the emergent character of the COVID-19, actual guidelines will have to be adjusted according to the evolution of the pandemic and the resources of the hospital and liberal sectors, in particular for the long-term follow-up of these patients. Current and future research will aim to assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions for people with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The emergence of COVID-19 required a very rapid adaptation of the health system. The role of physiotherapists is justified at every stage of patients care in order to limit the functional consequences of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Home Care Services/standards , Intensive Care Units/standards , Physical Therapy Modalities/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Critical Pathways/standards , Humans , Internationality , Pandemics , Physical Therapy Modalities/statistics & numerical data , Physical Therapy Modalities/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
15.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(2): 289-292, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960918

ABSTRACT

Ms. H is a 78-year-old woman with a history of congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and recent stroke who was discharged 1 month ago from a subacute rehabilitation facility. She moved in with her son because she now requires a walker and cannot return to her third-floor apartment. One evening, Ms. H develops a low-grade fever and mild shortness of breath intermittently relieved by her albuterol inhaler. Her son is worried, but knows that his mom does not want to return to the hospital.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services/standards , Homebound Persons/rehabilitation , Patient Care Team/standards , Quality Assurance, Health Care/standards , Quality Indicators, Health Care/standards , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Quality of Health Care/standards , United States
18.
Rev. bras. enferm ; 73(supl.2): e20200310, 2020. tab
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-627468

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To suggest recommendations for the practice of Home Nursing in the context of COVID-19. Method: Reflective study, originated from readings associated with the theme, available in current guidelines from the Pan American Health Organization, World Health Organization and the Ministry of Health. Results: Recommendations were developed from current scientific evidence for prevention of infections, control of epidemics and pandemics in the Brazilian home scenario. Final considerations: the reflections achieved contribute to guiding actions for better assistance to the patient, family caregivers and the community in the perspective of safe home care with COVID-19, and it is characterized as an introductory discussion on the theme, encouraging new studies to be carried out from the unfolding of the current scenario.


RESUMEN Objetivo: Proponer recomendaciones para la práctica de enfermería domiciliaria en el contexto de la COVID-19. Método: Estudio reflexivo, producido a partir de lecturas relacionadas con el área temática, disponibles en directrices actuales de la Organización Panamericana de la Salud, Organización Mundial de la Salud y Ministerio de la Salud. Resultados: Han sido construidas recomendaciones a partir de evidencias científicas actuales para prevención de infecciones, control de epidemias y pandemias en el contexto domiciliario brasileño. Conclusiones: Las reflexiones realizadas contribuyen para orientar acciones con vistas a una mejor asistencia al paciente, familiares cuidadores y comunidad en la perspectiva de una atención domiciliaria segura en relación a la COVID-19; se caracterizan como una discusión inicial sobre el tema, estimulando que nuevos estudios sean realizados a partir de la evolución del escenario actual.


RESUMO Objetivo: Propor recomendações para a prática de enfermagem domiciliar no contexto da COVID-19. Método: Estudo reflexivo, produzido com base em leituras correlacionadas com a área temática, disponíveis em diretrizes atuais da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Organização Mundial da Saúde e Ministério da Saúde. Resultados: Foram construídas recomendações segundo evidências científicas atuais para prevenção de infecções, controle de epidemias e pandemias no contexto domiciliar brasileiro. Considerações finais: As reflexões realizadas contribuem para nortear ações com vistas a uma melhor assistência ao paciente, familiares cuidadores e comunidade na perspectiva de um cuidado domiciliar seguro em relação à COVID-19; se caracterizam como uma discussão inicial sobre o tema, estimulando que novos estudos sejam realizados com base na evolução do cenário atual.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Patient Education as Topic , Caregivers/education , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Betacoronavirus , Home Care Services/standards , Home Nursing/standards , Brazil , Pandemics , Middle Aged
19.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(11): 1322-1324, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603857

ABSTRACT

Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a class I treatment for cardiovascular disease, however, underutilization of these services remains. Home-based CR (HBCR) models have been implemented as a potential solution to addressing access barriers to CR services. Home-based models have been shown to be effective, however, there continues to be large variation of protocols and minimal evidence of effectiveness in higher risk populations. In addition, lack of reimbursement models has discouraged the widespread adoption of HBCR. During the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, an even greater gap in CR care has been present due to decreased availability of on-site services. The COVID-19 pandemic presents a time to highlight the value and experiences of home-based models as clinicians search for ways to continue to provide care. Continued review and standardization of HBCR models are essential to provide care for a wider range of patients and circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiac Rehabilitation/methods , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Cardiac Rehabilitation/standards , Diet , Exercise , Health Services Accessibility , Home Care Services/standards , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , United States Department of Veterans Affairs
20.
Home Health Care Serv Q ; 39(4): 223-237, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597183

ABSTRACT

Home care for elderly people is an important part of the social welfare system. The sector employs many people, especially women, and work environment issues are common. This review explores the scientific literature on organizational interventions that target the home care work environment. Altogether, 16 studies of varying quality met the inclusion criteria. The interventions identified involved organizational change, education and training, digitalization and scheduling. Many interventions were concerned with changing specific behaviors or with introducing new technology rather than tackling complex issues such as sick leave, stress or gender inequality. Employee participation increased the likelihood of success.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services/standards , Workplace/standards , Home Care Services/trends , Humans , Workplace/psychology
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