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1.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(5): 1250-1261, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219872

ABSTRACT

The administration of spike monoclonal antibody treatment to patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 is very challenging. This article summarizes essential components and processes in establishing an effective spike monoclonal antibody infusion program. Rapid identification of a dedicated physical infrastructure was essential to circumvent the logistical challenges of caring for infectious patients while maintaining compliance with regulations and ensuring the safety of our personnel and other patients. Our partnerships and collaborations among multiple different specialties and disciplines enabled contributions from personnel with specific expertise in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, infection prevention and control, electronic health record (EHR) informatics, compliance, legal, medical ethics, engineering, administration, and other critical areas. Clear communication and a culture in which all roles are welcomed at the planning and operational tables are critical to the rapid development and refinement needed to adapt and thrive in providing this time-sensitive beneficial therapy. Our partnerships with leaders and providers outside our institutions, including those who care for underserved populations, have promoted equity in the access of monoclonal antibodies in our regions. Strong support from institutional leadership facilitated expedited action when needed, from a physical, personnel, and system infrastructure standpoint. Our ongoing real-time assessment and monitoring of our clinical program allowed us to improve and optimize our processes to ensure that the needs of our patients with COVID-19 in the outpatient setting are met.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Critical Pathways , Home Infusion Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Protocols , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Critical Pathways/trends , Efficiency, Organizational , Home Infusion Therapy/methods , Home Infusion Therapy/standards , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Organizational Culture , Program Development/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , United States/epidemiology
2.
J Infus Nurs ; 43(6): 313-314, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177349
3.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211007020, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153959

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic interventions to manage symptoms of COVID-19 are continually evolving and being used in a variety of settings. In an attempt to reduce the potential for a high influx of hospital admissions for COVID-19 and mitigate the advancement of COVID-19 disease in infected patients, an outpatient therapy clinic for infusion therapy was established. The focus of the current paper is to outline the development of the outpatient treatment center, provide a detailed summary of workflow and discuss operational challenges and directions for the future.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities , Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/drug therapy , Delivery of Health Care , Home Infusion Therapy , Pandemics , Rural Population , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Rural Health Services , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 47(6): 629-630, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-874113

ABSTRACT

Infusion of antineoplastic medications in nontraditional settings, including the home, is not a new concept. However, the emergence of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, has accelerated conversations around ensuring that patients with cancer can continue timely cancer treatment regimens while minimizing their risk of COVID-19 exposure and infection. Administration of antineoplastics through home infusion has been offered as a potential solution and continues to gain momentum among healthcare facilities and third-party payers.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Home Infusion Therapy/nursing , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Oncology Nursing , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk , Societies, Nursing , United States/epidemiology
5.
Br J Community Nurs ; 25(8): 376-380, 2020 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-708758

ABSTRACT

There has been a surging interest in using elastomeric infusion devices to deliver outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), which is more cost-effective than standard antibiotic administration, which requires multiple daily home visits. This has been particularly important since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, because reducing patient contact can also help to minimise transmission of COVID-19 to outpatients who are at a high risk of COVID-19-triggered complications. In this retrospective study, the clinical effectiveness of intravenous (IV) infusion of flucloxacillin using an elastomeric device was explored in a convenience sample of patients. Patients with three primary infective diagnoses-bloodstream infection, non-vertebral osteomyelitis and vertebral osteomyelitis-were included in the analyses. In non-vertebral osteomyelitis patients, Accufuser antibiotic infusion shortened the course of OPAT care relative to standard antibiotic administration (p<.05). In contrast, in vertebral osteomyelitis patients, it prolonged the course of OPAT care relative to standard administration (p<.05). In patients with bloodstream infections, no significant difference was found between the treatment modes (p=.93). Thus, the clinical effectiveness of Accufuser antibiotic infusion varies among patients with different infective diagnoses, and there seems to be a complex relationship between the method of antibiotic delivery and the patient's condition.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Community Health Nursing/methods , Floxacillin/administration & dosage , Home Infusion Therapy/methods , Infusion Pumps , Osteomyelitis/drug therapy , Spinal Diseases/drug therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Elastomers , Humans , Infusions, Intravenous/instrumentation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Mult Scler ; 26(10): 1163-1171, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be at higher risk for complications from the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic due to use of immunomodulatory disease modifying therapies (DMTs) and greater need for medical services. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate risk factors for COVID-19 susceptibility and describe the pandemic's impact on healthcare delivery. METHODS: Surveys sent to MS patients at Cleveland Clinic, Johns Hopkins, and Vall d'Hebron-Centre d'Esclerosi Múltiple de Catalunya in April and May 2020 collected information about comorbidities, DMTs, exposures, COVID-19 testing/outcomes, health behaviors, and disruptions to MS care. RESULTS: There were 3028/10,816 responders. Suspected or confirmed COVID-19 cases were more likely to have a known COVID-19 contact (odds ratio (OR): 4.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 18.54). In multivariable-adjusted models, people who were younger, had to work on site, had a lower education level, and resided in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas were less likely to follow social distancing guidelines. 4.4% reported changes to therapy plans, primarily delays in infusions, and 15.5% a disruption to rehabilitative services. CONCLUSION: Younger people with lower socioeconomic status required to work on site may be at higher exposure risk and are potential targets for educational intervention and work restrictions to limit exposure. Providers should be mindful of potential infusion delays and MS care disruption.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Employment , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Occupational Therapy , Physical Therapy Modalities , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Class , Adult , Age Factors , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , Disease Management , Disease Susceptibility , Educational Status , Female , Health Behavior , Health Services Accessibility , Home Infusion Therapy , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
7.
Mol Genet Metab ; 130(4): 227-229, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548553

ABSTRACT

Fabry disease is an X-linked disease due to a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Clinical symptoms in classically affected males include acroparesthesia, anhydrosis and angiokeratoma, which may present during childhood followed by cardiac, cerebral and renal complications. Even though pulmonary involvement is not widely appreciated by clinicians, an obstructive lung disease is another recognized component of Fabry disease. Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19), caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus was labeled as a global pandemic and patients with Fabry disease can be considered at high risk of developing severe complications. The impact of COVID-19 on patients with Fabry disease receiving enzyme replacement therapy is still unknown. Many patients who receive treatment in the hospital experienced infusion disruptions due to fear of infection. Effects of temporary treatment interruption was described in more detail in other lysosomal storage diseases, but the recommencement of therapy does not fully reverse clinical decline due to the temporary discontinuation. When possible, home-therapy seems to be the most efficient way to maintain enzyme replacement therapy access during pandemic. Sentence take-home message: Home-therapy, when possible, seems to be the most efficient way to maintain enzyme replacement therapy access during pandemic in patients with Fabry disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Enzyme Replacement Therapy/standards , Fabry Disease/therapy , Home Infusion Therapy/standards , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Continuity of Patient Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Enzyme Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Fabry Disease/complications , Fabry Disease/diagnosis , Female , Home Infusion Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Infusions, Intravenous , Isoenzymes/administration & dosage , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recombinant Proteins/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , alpha-Galactosidase/administration & dosage
10.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 8(6): 1894-1899.e2, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A rapidly expanding pandemic of the new coronavirus has become the focus of global scientific attention. Data are lacking on the impact of the pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 on health-related quality of life among patients affected by primary antibody deficiencies (PADs). OBJECTIVE: To identify factors impacting the health-related-quality of life (HRQOL) among Italian patients affected by PADs switched to remote assistance at the time of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: The quality of life was surveyed in 158 patients with PADs by the Common Variable Immune Deficiency Quality of Life questionnaire, a disease-specific tool, and by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, a generic tool to assess the risk of anxiety/depression. Since the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic, we shifted all patients with PADs to home therapy, and activated remote visits. Questionnaires were sent by email 4 weeks later. Common Variable Immune Deficiency Quality of Life questionnaire and 12-item General Health Questionnaire data scores were compared with the same set of data from a survey done in 2017. RESULTS: Of 210 patients, 158 (75%) agreed to participate. The quality of life was worse in the group of patients who were at risk of anxiety/depression at the study time. HRQOL was similar in patients forced to shift from hospital-based to home-based immunoglobulin treatment and in patients who continued their usual home-based replacement. The risk of anxiety/depression is associated with pandemia caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and with patients' fragility, and not with related clinical conditions associated with common variable immune deficiencies. Anxiety about running out of medications is a major new issue. CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic impacted HRQOL and the risk of anxiety/depression of patients with PADs. The remote assistance program was a useful possibility to limit personal contacts without influencing the HRQOL.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/psychology , Common Variable Immunodeficiency/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Immunoglobulins/administration & dosage , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Quality of Life/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Home Infusion Therapy/psychology , Humans , Infusions, Subcutaneous , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
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