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1.
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can ; 41(9): 254-263, 2021 09 22.
Article in English, French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638356

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Restrictions to do with the COVID-19 pandemic have had substantial unintended consequences on Canadians' alcohol consumption patterns, including increased emotional distress and its potential impact on alcohol use. This study examines 1) changes in adults' alcohol consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia; 2) whether drinking more frequently during the pandemic is associated with increased feelings of stress, loneliness and hopelessness; and 3) whether gender moderates this relationship. METHODS: Participants were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 2000 adults. Adjusted multinomial regression models were used to assess the association between drinking frequency and increased feelings of stress, loneliness and hopelessness. Additional analyses were stratified by gender. RESULTS: About 12% of respondents reported drinking more frequently after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and 25%-40% reported increased emotional distress. Increased feelings of stress (odds ratio [OR] = 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-2.93), loneliness (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.22-2.61) and hopelessness (OR = 1.98; 95% CI: 1.21-3.23) were all associated with drinking more frequently during the pandemic. While women respondents reported higher rates of emotional distress, significant associations with increased drinking frequency were only observed among men in gender-stratified analyses. CONCLUSION: Individuals who report increased feelings of stress, loneliness and hopelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to report increased drinking frequency; however, these associations were only significant for men in stratified analyses. Understanding how the pandemic is associated with mental health and drinking may inform alcohol control policies and public health interventions to minimize alcohol-related harm.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Alcohol Drinking/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Hope , Loneliness , Psychological Distress , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Brunswick , Nova Scotia , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
4.
J Perioper Pract ; 30(6): 151, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477003
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(10): 481-483, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443155

ABSTRACT

The past 18 months has been filled with transitions for healthcare organizations, for nurses, and for the patients and families they care for. As we transition from the real and virtual confines inflicted by the pandemic, the light shines on gratitude for relationships cultivated and the hope they bring.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Hope , Job Satisfaction , Nurse's Role/psychology , Workplace/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , United States
7.
Health Promot Chronic Dis Prev Can ; 41(9): 254-263, 2021 09 22.
Article in English, French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436506

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Restrictions to do with the COVID-19 pandemic have had substantial unintended consequences on Canadians' alcohol consumption patterns, including increased emotional distress and its potential impact on alcohol use. This study examines 1) changes in adults' alcohol consumption during the COVID-19 pandemic in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia; 2) whether drinking more frequently during the pandemic is associated with increased feelings of stress, loneliness and hopelessness; and 3) whether gender moderates this relationship. METHODS: Participants were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 2000 adults. Adjusted multinomial regression models were used to assess the association between drinking frequency and increased feelings of stress, loneliness and hopelessness. Additional analyses were stratified by gender. RESULTS: About 12% of respondents reported drinking more frequently after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, and 25%-40% reported increased emotional distress. Increased feelings of stress (odds ratio [OR] = 1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-2.93), loneliness (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.22-2.61) and hopelessness (OR = 1.98; 95% CI: 1.21-3.23) were all associated with drinking more frequently during the pandemic. While women respondents reported higher rates of emotional distress, significant associations with increased drinking frequency were only observed among men in gender-stratified analyses. CONCLUSION: Individuals who report increased feelings of stress, loneliness and hopelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic were more likely to report increased drinking frequency; however, these associations were only significant for men in stratified analyses. Understanding how the pandemic is associated with mental health and drinking may inform alcohol control policies and public health interventions to minimize alcohol-related harm.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Alcohol Drinking/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Hope , Loneliness , Psychological Distress , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Brunswick , Nova Scotia , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(34): e27016, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376351

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nursing students are the main force of future nursing development, and their hope and death anxiety are important aspects of their coping styles and clinical practice.The present study examined the relationships between hope, death anxiety and simplified coping style scores of nursing students during the outbreak of COVID-19.Between February and April 2020, a cross-sectional descriptive study was performed using a Sojump online survey, and 870 nursing students completed the herth hope (HH), death anxiety scale (DAS) and simplified coping style questionnaire. The data were analyzed using t-tests, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and multiple linear regression in SPSS 23.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY).The average HH, DAS and active and passive coping scores of the 870 nursing students were 3.07 ±â€Š0.32, 3.01 ±â€Š0.37, 2.84 ±â€Š0.48, and 2.25 ±â€Š0.50, respectively. Participants with contact experience with individuals with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 were more likely to adopt passive coping styles than students without contact experience (t = 5.019, P = .025). Being older and having higher inner positive readiness and expectancy, a lower inner sense of temporality and future, and lower time awareness were predictors of passive coping styles (P < .05). Living in cities (vs towns) and having a higher inner positive readiness and expectancy, a higher inner sense of temporality and future and lower cognition of death were predictors of active coping styles (P < .05).The findings of this study suggest that hope and death anxiety are important aspects of the coping styles of nursing students. Nursing educators should emphasize the role of hope, further deepen the death education mode, and perform scientific and reasonable death education programmes to reduce the death anxiety level of nursing students to promote their coping styles in crisis.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Attitude to Death , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hope , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(8): e26111, 2021 08 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341579

ABSTRACT

Although COVID-19 vaccines are becoming increasingly available, their ability to effectively control and contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is highly contingent on an array of factors. This paper discusses how limitations to vaccine accessibility, issues associated with vaccine side effects, concerns regarding vaccine efficacy, along with the persistent prevalence of vaccine hesitancy among the public, including health care professionals, might impact the potential of COVID-19 vaccines to curb the pandemic. We draw insights from the literature to identify practical solutions that could boost people's adoption of COVID-19 vaccines and their accessibility. We conclude with a discussion on health experts' and government officials' moral and ethical responsibilities to the public, even in light of the urgency to adopt and endorse "the greatest amount of good for the greatest number" utilitarian philosophy in controlling and managing the spread of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Hope , Humans , Motivation , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(7): e2118134, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321667

ABSTRACT

Importance: Diseases of despair (ie, mortality or morbidity from suicidality, drug abuse, and alcoholism) were first characterized as increasing in rural White working-class populations in midlife with low educational attainment and associated with long-term economic decline. Excess mortality now appears to be associated with working-class citizens across demographic and geographic boundaries, but no known qualitative studies have engaged residents of rural and urban locales with high prevalence of diseases of despair to learn their perspectives. Objective: To explore perceptions about despair-related illness and potential intervention strategies among diverse community members residing in discrete rural and urban hotspots. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this qualitative study, high-prevalence hotspots for diseases of despair were identified from health insurance claims data in Central Pennsylvania. Four focus groups were conducted with 60 community members in organizations and coalitions from 3 census block group hotspot clusters in the health system between September 2019 and January 2020. Focus groups explored awareness and beliefs about causation and potential intervention strategies. Main Outcomes and Measures: A descriptive phenomenological approach was applied to thematic analysis, and a preliminary conceptual model was constructed to describe how various factors may be associated with perpetuating despair and with public health. Results: In total, 60 adult community members participated in 4 focus groups (44 women, 16 men; 40 White non-Hispanic, 17 Black, and 3 Hispanic/Latino members). Three focus groups with 43 members were held in rural areas with high prevalence of diseases of despair, and 1 focus group with 17 members in a high-prevalence urban area. Four themes emerged with respect to awareness and believed causation of despair-related illness, and participants identified common associated factors, including financial distress, lack of critical infrastructure and social services, deteriorating sense of community, and family fragmentation. Intervention strategies focused around 2 themes: (1) building resilience to despair through better community and organizational coordination and peer support at the local level and (2) encouraging broader state investments in social services and infrastructure to mitigate despair-related illness. Conclusions and Relevance: In this qualitative study, rural and urban community members identified common factors associated with diseases of despair, highlighting the association between long-term political and economic decline and public health and a need for both community- and state-level solutions to address despair. Health care systems participating in addressing community health needs may improve processes to screen for despair (eg, social history taking) and codesign primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions aimed at addressing factors associated with distress. Such actions have taken on greater urgency with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism/prevention & control , Attitude , Residence Characteristics , Rural Population , Substance-Related Disorders/prevention & control , Suicide/prevention & control , Urban Population , Adult , Alcoholism/etiology , Awareness , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Family , Female , Focus Groups , Hope , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Peer Group , Qualitative Research , Resilience, Psychological , Social Class , Social Work , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Suicide/psychology , Young Adult
11.
Lancet Neurol ; 20(8): 589-591, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320195
13.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 Jun 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273492

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: The COVID-19 pandemic exerts a negative influence on dietary behaviors, which may lead to health deterioration. Dietary behaviors may be determined by psychological characteristics, such as basic hope and resilience, which facilitate the effective adjustment to new difficult conditions. The professional literature includes no research on the role of basic hope and resilience in the context of undertaken dietary behaviors in the situations of mental load associated with pandemics. The study aimed at the description of the dietary behaviors of individuals with various intensities of the discussed psychological characteristics (basic hope and resilience); (2) The observational cross-sectional online questionnaire study was conducted with the participation of 1082 adult Polish inhabitants. Three psychological scales were used: PSS-10, the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS) and BHI-12 questionnaire. The assessment of the adherence to dietary recommendations was performed with the present authors' Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGA Index); (3) Results: The value of DGA Index was variable depending on the psychological profile of study participants. The highest adherence to the principles of appropriate nutrition was observed in individuals characterized by the ability to cope with difficult situations and those who quickly adapted to new changing circumstances. The DGA Index values became poorer with the deterioration of the coping ability as regards stress and mental load; (4) Conclusions: Nutritional education during pandemics should encompass the psychological profile of the patients. It requires the implementation of a different psychodietetic approach which will facilitate a more effective introduction of a well-balanced diet.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Diet/psychology , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Hope , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Nutrition Policy , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
14.
Gerontologist ; 61(4): 483-486, 2021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261045

Subject(s)
Hope , Long-Term Care , Humans , Workforce
15.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(3)2021 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231535

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To focus on the first feelings, attitudes, and planned reactions of psychiatric workers in Hungary to the news of the appearance of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to examine any differences between psychiatrists/psychologists and nurses/other professionals regarding these attitudes. METHODS: Hungarian psychiatric workers (N = 119) including psychiatrists/psychologists (n = 78) and nurses/other professionals (n = 41) participated in the study. To measure attitudes, a questionnaire was designed consisting of 7 questions and filled out within 1-3 days after the declaration of emergency in response to COVID-19 in Hungary on March 11, 2020. RESULTS: Psychiatric workers, especially psychiatrists/psychologists, regarded information gathering from valid sources as important. When examining the first feelings, we found that the psychiatrists/psychologists group tended to feel higher extent of anxiety, while the nurses/other professionals group showed higher extent of hope. When investigating willingness to work in the pandemic situation, a lower percentage of Hungarian psychiatric workers (58%) would choose to continue working compared to previous research. Answers to open-ended questions revealed that denial was the most frequent coping reaction. CONCLUSIONS: These differences could be attributed to the finding that psychiatrists/psychologists, who had faced the reality of the virus situation via the news, tended to have more realistic attitudes toward the virus, while nurses/other professionals, who had avoided valid information, tended to have less realistic attitudes.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Nurses , Psychiatry , Psychology , Adult , Anxiety , Female , Hope , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Hungary , Male , Middle Aged , Psychiatric Nursing , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Work, Psychiatric , Social Workers , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251641, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226902

ABSTRACT

Limited evidence exists to help understand the experiences of university students in relation to the long-term lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. For that reason, we conducted a study using a phenomenographic approach in order to understand how university students perceive COVID-19 and the associated lockdown. Data were collected from 25 students in Pakistan. They were asked to demonstrate the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown in illustrations. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with these students, to gain further insights into their perspectives on the psychosocial effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The analysis revealed four interlinked directions for understanding students' experiences. These themes were: 1) escape into peace, 2) hope for personal freedom, 3) fear of becoming a victim of COVID-19, and 4) concerns regarding education, future career, and opportunities. All four themes were analyzed and condensed into an outcome space, which further gathers the perceptions of students under one theme as "Hope for life while paradoxically living with fear". Studying the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown on students not only highlighted their concerns, but also emphasized the importance of starting regular psychological evaluations and stress-releasing sessions, along with online education to overcome growing depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/etiology , Education, Distance , Fear , Female , Hope , Humans , Male , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Students/psychology , Universities
17.
Pediatrics ; 147(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219963
18.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(4): 160-162, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211957

ABSTRACT

Generation Z is entering the workforce, requiring nursing professional development (NPD) practitioners to consider their unique characteristics when planning ongoing professional learning. They are also entering the profession at a time when concerns for well-being and resilience are at an all-time high. This article compares psychological capital scores between generational cohorts and provides strategies for the NPD practitioner with the development and education of Generation Z nurses. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(4):160-162.].


Subject(s)
Education, Professional , Nurse Practitioners , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Hope , Humans
19.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(4)2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180958
20.
Br J Community Nurs ; 25(Sup9): S38-S40, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-750258
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