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1.
Eur Respir J ; 56(2)2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744960

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has globally strained medical resources and caused significant mortality. OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate a machine-learning model based on clinical features for severity risk assessment and triage for COVID-19 patients at hospital admission. METHOD: 725 patients were used to train and validate the model. This included a retrospective cohort from Wuhan, China of 299 hospitalised COVID-19 patients from 23 December 2019 to 13 February 2020, and five cohorts with 426 patients from eight centres in China, Italy and Belgium from 20 February 2020 to 21 March 2020. The main outcome was the onset of severe or critical illness during hospitalisation. Model performances were quantified using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and metrics derived from the confusion matrix. RESULTS: In the retrospective cohort, the median age was 50 years and 137 (45.8%) were male. In the five test cohorts, the median age was 62 years and 236 (55.4%) were male. The model was prospectively validated on five cohorts yielding AUCs ranging from 0.84 to 0.93, with accuracies ranging from 74.4% to 87.5%, sensitivities ranging from 75.0% to 96.9%, and specificities ranging from 55.0% to 88.0%, most of which performed better than the pneumonia severity index. The cut-off values of the low-, medium- and high-risk probabilities were 0.21 and 0.80. The online calculators can be found at www.covid19risk.ai. CONCLUSION: The machine-learning model, nomogram and online calculator might be useful to access the onset of severe and critical illness among COVID-19 patients and triage at hospital admission.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality/trends , Machine Learning , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Triage/methods , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Area Under Curve , Belgium , China , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Decision Support Systems, Clinical , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internationality , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Predictive Value of Tests , ROC Curve , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Survival Analysis
3.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 75: e2294, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740557

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We designed a cohort study to describe characteristics and outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in the largest public hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil, as Latin America becomes the epicenter of the pandemic. METHODS: This is the protocol for a study being conducted at an academic hospital in Brazil with 300 adult ICU beds dedicated to COVID-19 patients. We will include adult patients admitted to the ICU with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 during the study period. The main outcome is ICU survival at 28 days. Data will be collected prospectively and retrospectively by trained investigators from the hospital's electronic medical records, using an electronic data capture tool. We will collect data on demographics, comorbidities, severity of disease, and laboratorial test results at admission. Information on the need for advanced life support and ventilator parameters will be collected during ICU stay. Patients will be followed up for 28 days in the ICU and 60 days in the hospital. We will plot Kaplan-Meier curves to estimate ICU and hospital survival and perform survival analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model to identify the main risk factors for mortality. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04378582. RESULTS: We expect to include a large sample of patients with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU and to be able to provide data on admission characteristics, use of advanced life support, ICU survival at 28 days, and hospital survival at 60 days. CONCLUSIONS: This study will provide epidemiological data about critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Brazil, which could inform health policy and resource allocation in low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Brazil , Cohort Studies , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Research Design
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21700, 2020 Aug 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740200

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has become a global health threat and will likely be one of the greatest global challenges in the near future. The battle between clinicians and the COVID-19 outbreak may be a "protracted war."The objective of this study was to investigate the risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19, so as to provide a reference for the early diagnosis and treatment.This study retrospectively enrolled 118 patients diagnosed with COVID-19, who were admitted to Eastern District of Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from February 04, 2020 to March 04, 2020. The demographics and laboratory data were collected and compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. The risk factors of in-hospital mortality were explored by univariable and multivariable logistic regression to construct a clinical prediction model, the prediction efficiency of which was verified by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve.A total of 118 patients (49 males and 69 females) were included in this study; the results revealed that the following factors associated with in-hospital mortality: older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.175, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.073-1.287, P = .001), neutrophil count greater than 6.3 × 10 cells/L (OR 7.174, (95% CI 2.295-22.432, P = .001), lymphocytopenia (OR 0.069, 95% CI 0.007-0.722, P = .026), prothrombin time >13 seconds (OR 11.869, 95% CI 1.433-98.278, P = .022), D-dimer >1 mg/L (OR 22.811, 95% CI 2.224-233.910, P = .008) and procalcitonin (PCT) >0.1 ng/mL (OR 23.022, 95% CI 3.108-170.532, P = .002). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the above indicators for predicting in-hospital mortality were 0.808 (95% CI 0.715-0.901), 0.809 (95% CI 0.710-0.907), 0.811 (95% CI 0.724-0.898), 0.745 (95% CI 0.643-0.847), 0.872 (95% CI 0.804-0.940), 0.881 (95% CI 0.809-0.953), respectively. The AUC of combined diagnosis of these aforementioned factors were 0.992 (95% CI 0.981-1.000).In conclusion, older age, increased neutrophil count, prothrombin time, D-dimer, PCT, and decreased lymphocyte count at admission were risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality of COVID-19. The prediction model combined of these factors could improve the early identification of mortality risk in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Leukocyte Count , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Procalcitonin/analysis , Prothrombin Time , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Leukocyte Count/methods , Leukocyte Count/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Prothrombin Time/methods , Prothrombin Time/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors
8.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(3): 598-604, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733389

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is currently a lack of clinical data on the novel beta-coronavirus infection [caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] and concomitant primary lung cancer. Our goal was to report our experiences with 5 patients treated for lung cancer while infected with SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 5 adult patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 who were admitted to our thoracic surgery unit between 29 January 2020 and 4 March 2020 for surgical treatment of a primary lung cancer. Clinical data and outcomes are reported. RESULTS: All patients were men with a mean age of 74.0 years (range 67-80). Four of the 5 patients (80%) reported chronic comorbidities. Surgery comprised minimally invasive lobectomy (2 patients) and segmentectomy (1 patient), lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection (1 patient) and pneumonectomy (1 patient). Mean chest drain duration was 12.4 days (range 8-22); mean hospital stay was 33.8 days (range 21-60). SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms were fever (3 patients), persistent cough (3 patients), diarrhoea (2 patients) and syncope (2 patients); 1 patient reported no symptoms. Morbidity related to surgery was 60%; 30-day mortality was 40%. Two patients (1 with a right pneumonectomy, 74 years old; 1 with a lobectomy with chest wall resection and reconstruction, 70 years old), developed SARS-CoV-2-related lung failure leading to death 60 and 32 days after surgery, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Lung cancer surgery may represent a high-risk factor for developing a severe case of coronavirus disease 2019, particularly in patients with advanced stages of lung cancer. Additional strategies are needed to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 infection during treatment for lung cancer.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy , Length of Stay , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Sampling Studies , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/mortality , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Treatment Outcome
9.
J Diabetes Res ; 2020: 1652403, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733124

ABSTRACT

Background: Since December 2019, novel coronavirus- (SARS-CoV-2) infected pneumonia (COVID-19) has rapidly spread throughout China. This study is aimed at describing the characteristics of COVID-19 patients in Wuhan. Methods: 199 COVID-19 patients were admitted to Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in China from January 24th to March 15th. The cases were divided into diabetic and nondiabetic groups according to the history of taking antidiabetic drugs or by plasma fasting blood glucose level at admission, and the difference between groups were compared. Results: Among 199 COVID-19 patients, 76 were diabetic and 123 were nondiabetic. Compared with nondiabetics, patients with diabetes had an older age, high levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), D-dimer, white blood cell, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and total bilirubin (TBIL), lower levels of lymphocyte, albumin and oxygen saturation (SaO2), and higher mortality (P < 0.05). The two groups showed no difference in clinical symptoms. Diabetes, higher level of D-dimer at admission, and lymphocyte count less than 0.6 × 109/L at admission were associated with increasing odds of death. Antidiabetic drugs were associated with decreasing odds of death. Treatment with low molecular weight heparin was not related to odds of death. Conclusion: The mortality rate of COVID-19 patients with diabetes was significantly higher than those without diabetes. Diabetes, higher level of D-dimer, and lymphocyte count less than 0.6 × 109/L at admission were the risk factors associated with in-hospital death.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/blood , Diabetes Complications/drug therapy , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
11.
JCI Insight ; 5(13)2020 07 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDFatal cases of COVID-19 are increasing globally. We retrospectively investigated the potential of immunologic parameters as early predictors of COVID-19.METHODSA total of 1018 patients with confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in our 2-center retrospective study. Clinical feature, laboratory test, immunological test, radiological findings, and outcomes data were collected. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors associated with in-hospital mortality. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and survival curves were plotted to evaluate their clinical utility.RESULTSThe counts of all T lymphocyte subsets were markedly lower in nonsurvivors than in survivors, especially CD8+ T cells. Among all tested cytokines, IL-6 was elevated most significantly, with an upward trend of more than 10-fold. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, IL-6 levels of more than 20 pg/mL and CD8+ T cell counts of less than 165 cells/µL were found to be associated with in-hospital mortality after adjusting for confounding factors. Groups with IL-6 levels of more than 20 pg/mL and CD8+ T cell counts of less than 165 cells/µL had a higher percentage of older and male patients as well as a higher proportion of patients with comorbidities, ventilation, intensive care unit admission, shock, and death. Furthermore, the receiver operating curve of the model combining IL-6 (>20 pg/mL) and CD8+ T cell counts (<165 cells/µL) displayed a more favorable discrimination than that of the CURB-65 score. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed a good fit of the model, with no statistical significance.CONCLUSIONIL-6 (>20 pg/mL) and CD8+ T cell counts (<165 cells/µL) are 2 reliable prognostic indicators that accurately stratify patients into risk categories and predict COVID-19 mortality.FundingThis work was supported by funding from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (no. 81772477 and 81201848).


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Hospital Mortality , Interleukin-6/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Aged , Area Under Curve , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-8/immunology , Logistic Models , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Receptors, Interleukin-2/immunology , Retrospective Studies , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
12.
J Orthop Trauma ; 34(9): e325-e329, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732070

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the care of hip fracture patients remains a clinical priority. Our study aims to investigate the 30-day mortality rate of hip fracture patients during the first 30 days of the pandemic in the United Kingdom. METHODS: A single-center, observational, prospective study of patients presenting with hip fractures. Data collection started from "day 0" of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom and continued for 30 days. We collected data on time to surgery, Clinical Frailty Scale score, Nottingham Hip Fracture Score, COVID-19 infection status, 30-day mortality, and cause of death. For comparison, we collected retrospective data during the same 30-day period in 2018, 2019, and the previous 6 months (Control groups A, B, and C, respectively). RESULTS: Forty-three patients were included in the study. There was no difference in age or gender between the Study and Control groups. The 30-day mortality rate of the Study group was 16.3%, which was higher than Control groups A (P = 0.022), B (P = 0.003) and C (P = 0.001). The prevalence of COVID-19 infection in our Study group was 26%. Of the 7 mortalities recorded, 4 patients tested positive for COVID-19 infection. In our Study group, COVID-19 infection correlated significantly with 30-day mortality (P = 0.002, odds ratio 2.4). CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated a significant increase in 30-day mortality among hip fracture patients during the first 30 days of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom. A positive COVID-19 test result in patients with hip fractures is associated with a 2.4-fold increase in risk of 30-day mortality. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Fracture Fixation, Internal , Hip Fractures/complications , Hip Fractures/surgery , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate , Time Factors , United Kingdom
13.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 24(15): 8219-8225, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724284

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: At the end of 2019, the Novel Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), spread rapidly from China to the whole world. Circadian rhythms can play crucial role in the complex interplay between viruses and organisms, and temporized schedules (chronotherapy) have been positively tested in several medical diseases. We aimed to compare the possible effects of a morning vs. evening antiviral administration in COVID patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated all patients admitted to COVID internal medicine units with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, and treated with darunavir-ritonavir (single daily dose, for seven days). Age, sex, length of stay (LOS), pharmacological treatment, and timing of antiviral administration (morning or evening), were recorded. Outcome indicators were death or LOS, and laboratory parameters, e.g., variations in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, ratio of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2, mmHg) to fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2) (PaO2/FiO2), and leucocyte count. RESULTS: The total sample consisted of 151 patients, 33 (21.8%) of whom were selected for antiviral treatment. The mean age was 61.8±18.3 years, 17 (51.5%) were male, and the mean LOS was 13.4±8.6 days. Nine patients (27.3%) had their antiviral administration in the morning, and 24 (72.7%) had antiviral administration in the evening. No fatalities occurred. Despite the extremely limited sample size, morning group subjects showed a significant difference in CRP variation, compared to that in evening group subjects (-65.82±33.26 vs. 83.32±304.89, respectively, p<0.032). No significant differences were found for other parameters. CONCLUSIONS: This report is the first study evaluating temporized morning vs. evening antiviral administration in SARS-CoV-2 patients. The morning regimen was associated with a significant reduction in CRP values. Further confirmations with larger and multicenter samples of patients could reveal novel potentially useful insights.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Darunavir/administration & dosage , Drug Chronotherapy , Hospital Mortality , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ritonavir/administration & dosage , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Blood Gas Analysis , C-Reactive Protein , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Italy , Leukocyte Count , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Pandemics , Partial Pressure , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Retrospective Studies
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(8): e2018039, 2020 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-718305

ABSTRACT

Importance: While current reports suggest that a disproportionate share of US coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases and deaths are among Black residents, little information is available regarding how race is associated with in-hospital mortality. Objective: To evaluate the association of race, adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical factors, on all-cause, in-hospital mortality for patients with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study included 11 210 adult patients (age ≥18 years) hospitalized with confirmed severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) between February 19, 2020, and May 31, 2020, in 92 hospitals in 12 states: Alabama (6 hospitals), Maryland (1 hospital), Florida (5 hospitals), Illinois (8 hospitals), Indiana (14 hospitals), Kansas (4 hospitals), Michigan (13 hospitals), New York (2 hospitals), Oklahoma (6 hospitals), Tennessee (4 hospitals), Texas (11 hospitals), and Wisconsin (18 hospitals). Exposures: Confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection by positive result on polymerase chain reaction testing of a nasopharyngeal sample. Main Outcomes and Measures: Death during hospitalization was examined overall and by race. Race was self-reported and categorized as Black, White, and other or missing. Cox proportional hazards regression with mixed effects was used to evaluate associations between all-cause in-hospital mortality and patient characteristics while accounting for the random effects of hospital on the outcome. Results: Of 11 210 patients with confirmed COVID-19 presenting to hospitals, 4180 (37.3%) were Black patients and 5583 (49.8%) were men. The median (interquartile range) age was 61 (46 to 74) years. Compared with White patients, Black patients were younger (median [interquartile range] age, 66 [50 to 80] years vs 61 [46 to 72] years), were more likely to be women (2259 [49.0%] vs 2293 [54.9%]), were more likely to have Medicaid insurance (611 [13.3%] vs 1031 [24.7%]), and had higher median (interquartile range) scores on the Neighborhood Deprivation Index (-0.11 [-0.70 to 0.56] vs 0.82 [0.08 to 1.76]) and the Elixhauser Comorbidity Index (21 [0 to 44] vs 22 [0 to 46]). All-cause in-hospital mortality among hospitalized White and Black patients was 23.1% (724 of 3218) and 19.2% (540 of 2812), respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, insurance, comorbidities, neighborhood deprivation, and site of care, there was no statistically significant difference in risk of mortality between Black and White patients (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.09). Conclusions and Relevance: Although current reports suggest that Black patients represent a disproportionate share of COVID-19 infections and death in the United States, in this study, mortality for those able to access hospital care did not differ between Black and White patients after adjusting for sociodemographic factors and comorbidities.


Subject(s)
African Americans , Continental Population Groups , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospital Mortality/ethnology , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , European Continental Ancestry Group , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
15.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 26: 1076029620948137, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717447

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus caused a global pandemic within weeks, causing hundreds of thousands of people infected. Many patients with severe COVID-19 present with coagulation abnormalities, including increase D-dimers and fibrinogen. This coagulopathy is associated with an increased risk of death. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with severe COVID-19 develop sometimes unrecognized, venous, and arterial thromboembolic complications. A better understanding of COVID-19 pathophysiology, in particular hemostatic disorders, will help to choose appropriate treatment strategies. A rigorous thrombotic risk assessment and the implementation of a suitable anticoagulation strategy are required. We review here the characteristics of COVID-19 coagulation laboratory findings in affected patients, the incidence of thromboembolic events and their specificities, and potential therapeutic interventions.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Blood Coagulation Disorders/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/drug therapy , Blood Coagulation Disorders/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/physiopathology
16.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e21758, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714139

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an unfounded fervor surrounding the use of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and tocilizumab (TCZ); however, evidence on their efficacy and safety have been controversial. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the overall clinical effectiveness of HCQ and TCZ in patients with COVID-19. We hypothesize that HCQ and TCZ use in these patients will be associated with a reduction in in-hospital mortality, upgrade to intensive medical care, invasive mechanical ventilation, or acute renal failure needing dialysis. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed to determine the impact of HCQ and TCZ use on hard clinical outcomes during hospitalization. A total of 176 hospitalized patients with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis was included. Patients were divided into two comparison groups: (1) HCQ (n=144) vs no-HCQ (n=32) and (2) TCZ (n=32) vs no-TCZ (n=144). The mean age, baseline comorbidities, and other medications used during hospitalization were uniformly distributed among all the groups. Independent t tests and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to calculate mean differences and adjusted odds ratios with 95% CIs, respectively. RESULTS: The unadjusted odds ratio for patients upgraded to a higher level of care (ie, intensive care unit) (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.19-5.69; P=.003) and reductions in C-reactive protein (CRP) level on day 7 of hospitalization (21% vs 56%, OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.55; P=.002) were significantly higher in the TCZ group compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in the odds of in-hospital mortality, upgrade to intensive medical care, need for invasive mechanical ventilation, acute kidney failure necessitating dialysis, or discharge from the hospital after recovery in both the HCQ and TCZ groups compared to their respective control groups. Adjusted odds ratios controlled for baseline comorbidities and medications closely followed the unadjusted estimates. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of patients with COVID-19, neither HCQ nor TCZ offered a significant reduction in in-hospital mortality, upgrade to intensive medical care, invasive mechanical ventilation, or acute renal failure needing dialysis. These results are similar to the recently published preliminary results of the HCQ arm of the Recovery trial, which showed no clinical benefit from the use of HCQ in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (the TCZ arm is ongoing). Double-blinded randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate the impact of these drugs in larger patient samples so that data-driven guidelines can be deduced to combat this global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
17.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237558, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710228

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Covid-19 pandemic threatens to overwhelm scarce clinical resources. Risk factors for severe illness must be identified to make efficient resource allocations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors for severe illness. DESIGN: Retrospective, observational case series. SETTING: Single-institution. PARTICIPANTS: First 117 consecutive patients hospitalized for Covid-19 from March 1 to April 12, 2020. EXPOSURE: None. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Intensive care unit admission or death. RESULTS: In-hospital mortality was 24.8% and average total length of stay was 11.82 days (95% CI: 10.01 to 13.63 days). 30.8% of patients required intensive care unit admission and 29.1% required mechanical ventilation. Multivariate regression identified the amount of supplemental oxygen required at admission (OR: 1.208, 95% CI: 1.011-1.443, p = .037), sputum production (OR: 6.734, 95% CI: 1.630-27.812, p = .008), insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (OR: 11.873, 95% CI: 2.218-63.555, p = .004) and chronic kidney disease (OR: 4.793, 95% CI: 1.528-15.037, p = .007) as significant risk factors for intensive care unit admission or death. Of the 48 patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit or died, this occurred within 3 days of arrival in 42%, within 6 days in 71%, and within 9 days in 88% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: At our regional medical center, patients with Covid-19 had an average length of stay just under 12 days, required ICU care in 31% of cases, and had a 25% mortality rate. Patients with increased sputum production and higher supplemental oxygen requirements at admission, and insulin dependent diabetes or chronic kidney disease may be at increased risk for severe illness. A model for predicting intensive care unit admission or death with excellent discrimination was created that may aid in treatment decisions and resource allocation. Early identification of patients at increased risk for severe illness may lead to improved outcomes in patients hospitalized with Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Hospitalization , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Health Care Rationing , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Male , Maryland/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(32): e21380, 2020 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706044

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: On March 11, 2020, World Health Organization announced that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 caused COVID-19 was a global pandemic. COVID-19 is associated with venous thromboembolism including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. To further identify the current role of antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy in the prophylaxis and treatment of COVID-19 patients is important. METHODS: We will conduct a systematic review based on searches of major databases (eg, Pubmed, Web of Science, EMBASE, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, SCI-EXPANDED, CPCI-S, CBM, CNKI, and Wanfang Database) and clinical trial registries from inception to present without limitations of language and publication status. All published randomized control trials, quasi-randomized trials, retrospective and observational studies related to prophylactic antiplatelet/anticoagulant for severe COVID-19 will be included. Primary outcome includes incident acute thrombosis events. Second outcome is the incidence and severity of adverse effects. Full-text screening, data extraction and quality assessment will be conducted by 2 reviewers independently. The reporting quality, risk of bias, sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis will be performed to ensure the reliability of our findings by other 2 researchers. The statistical analysis will be performed by RevMan V.5.3 software and Stata V.12.0 software. RESULTS: The result of this systematic review will provide valid advice and consultation for clinicians on the management of prophylactic antiplatelet/anticoagulant for severe COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: This systematic review will provide evidence for prophylactic antiplatelet/anticoagulant of severe COVID-19 patients. PROSPERO REGISTRATION: CRD42020186928.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thrombosis/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Primary Prevention/methods , Prognosis , Research Design , Risk Assessment , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/prevention & control , Survival Analysis , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Treatment Outcome
20.
J Card Fail ; 26(7): 626-632, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory syndrome with high rates of mortality, and there is a need for easily obtainable markers to provide prognostic information. We sought to determine whether the electrocardiogram (ECG) on hospital presentation provides prognostic information, specifically related to death. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a retrospective cohort study in patients with COVID-19 who had an ECG at or near hospital admission. Clinical characteristics and ECG variables were manually abstracted from the electronic health record and first ECG. Our primary outcome was death. THERE WERE: 756 patients who presented to a large New York City teaching hospital with COVID-19 who underwent an ECG. The mean age was 63.3 ± 16 years, 37% were women, 61% of patients were nonwhite, and 57% had hypertension; 90 (11.9%) died. In a multivariable logistic regression that included age, ECG, and clinical characteristics, the presence of one or more atrial premature contractions (odds ratio [OR] 2.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-5.36, P = .01), a right bundle branch block or intraventricular block (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.32-5.18, P = .002), ischemic T-wave inversion (OR 3.49, 95% CI 1.56-7.80, P = .002), and nonspecific repolarization (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.27-4.21, P = .006) increased the odds of death. ST elevation was rare (n = 5 [0.7%]). CONCLUSIONS: We found that patients with ECG findings of both left-sided heart disease (atrial premature contractions, intraventricular block, repolarization abnormalities) and right-sided disease (right bundle branch block) have higher odds of death. ST elevation at presentation was rare.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Bundle-Branch Block/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Electrocardiography/mortality , Heart Failure/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bundle-Branch Block/diagnosis , Bundle-Branch Block/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Electrocardiography/methods , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies
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