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1.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(6): e36882, 2022 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875295

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic prompted widespread implementation of telehealth, including in the inpatient setting, with the goals to reduce potential pathogen exposure events and personal protective equipment (PPE) utilization. Nursing workflow adaptations in these novel environments are of particular interest given the association between nursing time at the bedside and patient safety. Understanding the frequency and duration of nurse-patient encounters following the introduction of a novel telehealth platform in the context of COVID-19 may therefore provide insight into downstream impacts on patient safety, pathogen exposure, and PPE utilization. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in nursing workflow relative to prepandemic levels using a real-time locating system (RTLS) following the deployment of inpatient telehealth on a COVID-19 unit. METHODS: In March 2020, telehealth was installed in patient rooms in a COVID-19 unit and on movable carts in 3 comparison units. The existing RTLS captured nurse movement during 1 pre- and 5 postpandemic stages (January-December 2020). Change in direct nurse-patient encounters, time spent in patient rooms per encounter, and total time spent with patients per shift relative to baseline were calculated. Generalized linear models assessed difference-in-differences in outcomes between COVID-19 and comparison units. Telehealth adoption was captured and reported at the unit level. RESULTS: Change in frequency of encounters and time spent per encounter from baseline differed between the COVID-19 and comparison units at all stages of the pandemic (all P<.001). Frequency of encounters decreased (difference-in-differences range -6.6 to -14.1 encounters) and duration of encounters increased (difference-in-differences range 1.8 to 6.2 minutes) from baseline to a greater extent in the COVID-19 units relative to the comparison units. At most stages of the pandemic, the change in total time nurses spent in patient rooms per patient per shift from baseline did not differ between the COVID-19 and comparison units (all P>.17). The primary COVID-19 unit quickly adopted telehealth technology during the observation period, initiating 15,088 encounters that averaged 6.6 minutes (SD 13.6) each. CONCLUSIONS: RTLS movement data suggest that total nursing time at the bedside remained unchanged following the deployment of inpatient telehealth in a COVID-19 unit. Compared to other units with shared mobile telehealth units, the frequency of nurse-patient in-person encounters decreased and the duration lengthened on a COVID-19 unit with in-room telehealth availability, indicating "batched" redistribution of work to maintain total time at bedside relative to prepandemic periods. The simultaneous adoption of telehealth suggests that virtual care was a complement to, rather than a replacement for, in-person care. However, study limitations preclude our ability to draw a causal link between nursing workflow change and telehealth adoption. Thus, further evaluation is needed to determine potential downstream implications on disease transmission, PPE utilization, and patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Care , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Nursing Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Workflow
3.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 21(1): 98, 2021 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care professionals in endoscopic labs have an elevated risk for COVID-19 infection, therefore, we aimed to determine the effect of current pandemic on the workflow and infection prevention and control strategies of endoscopy units in real-life setting. METHODS: All members of Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology were invited between 7 and 17 April 2020 to participate in this cross-section survey study and to complete an online, anonymous questionnaire. RESULTS: Total of 120 endoscopists from 83 institutes were enrolled of which 35.83% worked in regions with high cumulative incidence of COVID-19. Only 33.33% of them had undergone training about infection prevention in their workplace. 95.83% of endoscopists regularly used risk stratification of patients for infection prior endoscopy. While indications of examinations in low risk patients varied widely, in high-risk or positive patients endoscopy was limited to gastrointestinal bleeding (95.00%), removal of foreign body from esophagus (87.50%), management of obstructive jaundice (72.50%) and biliary pancreatitis (67.50%). Appropriate amount of personal protective equipment was available in 60.85% of endoscopy units. In high-risk or positive patients, surgical mask, filtering facepiece mask, protective eyewear and two pairs of gloves were applied in 30.83%, 76.67%, 90.00% and 87.50% of cases, respectively. Personal protective equipment fully complied with European guideline only in 67.50% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Survey found large variability in indications of endoscopy and relative weak compliance to national and international practical recommendations in terms of protective equipment. This could be improved by adequate training about infection prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Workflow , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Hungary , Patient Selection , Personal Protective Equipment
5.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S99-S106, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065056

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a multi-organ disease due to an infection with the SARS-CoV2 virus. It has become a pandemic in early 2020. The disease appears less devastating in children and adolescents. However, stress, quarantine and eventually mourning have major impacts on development. It is difficult to describe what this pandemic implies for a child psychiatrist, other than by giving a first-hand account. I propose to go through the main ethical questions that have arisen; to describe how my hospital team has reorganized itself to meet the new demands and questions, in particular by opening a unit dedicated to people with autism and challenging behaviors affected by COVID-19; and to address, in a context of national discussion, how the discipline has sought to understand the conditions of a certain well-being during quarantine. Finally, I will try to conclude with more speculative reflections on re-opening.


Subject(s)
Adolescent Psychiatry , Attitude of Health Personnel , Autistic Disorder/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Child Psychiatry , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychiatry , Adolescent , Adolescent Behavior , Adolescent Psychiatry/ethics , Autistic Disorder/complications , Autistic Disorder/psychology , COVID-19 , Child , Child Behavior , Child Psychiatry/ethics , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/complications , Cross Infection/psychology , Cross Infection/therapy , Environmental Exposure , France , Health Services Accessibility , Hospital Restructuring , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Mental Health Services/ethics , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , Olfaction Disorders/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Care Team , Patient Isolation/psychology , Play Therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Professional Practice/ethics , Protective Devices , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology
6.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S60-S65, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065053

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the 11 million people currently incarcerated worldwide is the subject of many concerns. Prisons and jails are filled with people suffering from many preexisting medical conditions increasing the risk of complications. Detainees' access to medical services is already limited and overcrowding poses a threat of massive contagion. Beyond the health impact of the crisis, the tightening of prison conditions worries. On March 16, 2020, in France, the lockdown measures have been accompanied by specific provisions for prisons: all facilities have suspended visitations, group activities and external interventions. Over 10,000 prisoners have been released to reduce the prison population and the risk of virus propagation. These adjustments had major consequences on the healthcare system in French prisons. The objectives of this article are to describe the reorganization of the three levels of psychiatric care for inmates in France in the context of Covid-19 pandemic and to have a look at the impact of lockdown measures and early releases on mental health of prisoners. METHODS: This work is based on a survey conducted in April 2020 in France among psychiatric healthcare providers working in 42 ambulatory units for inmates and in the 9 full-time inpatient psychiatric wards exclusively for inmates called "UHSAs" (which stands for "unités hospitalières spécialement aménagées", and can be translated as "specially equipped hospital units"). A review of the international literature on mental healthcare system for inmates during the Covid-19 epidemic has also been performed. RESULTS: The Covid-19 epidemic has been rather contained during the period of confinement in French prisons but the impact of confinement measures on the prison population is significant. The three levels of psychiatric care for inmates have implemented specific measures to ensure continuity of care, to support detainees during Coronavirus lockdown and to prevent an infection's spread. Among the most important are: limitation of medical consultations to serious and urgent cases, creation of "Covid units", cancellation of voluntary psychiatric hospitalizations, reinforcement of preventive hygiene measures and reshuffling of medical staff. Prolonged confinement has consequences on mental health of detainees. Currently, mental health workers are facing multiple clinical situations such as forced drug and substance withdrawal (linked to difficulties in supplying psychoactive substances), symptoms of anxiety (due to concerns for their own and their relatives' well-being) and decompensation among patients with severe psychiatric conditions. Early releases from prison may also raise some issues. People recently released from prison are identified as at high risk of death by suicide and drug overdose. The lack of time to provide the necessary link between health services within prisons and health structures outside could have serious consequences, emphasizing the well-known "revolving prison doors" effect. DISCUSSION: The current lockdown measures applied in French jails and prisons point out the disparities between psychiatric care for inmates and psychiatric care for general population. Giving the high vulnerability of prison population, public health authorities should pay more attention to health care in prisons.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Prisoners/psychology , Prisons , Adult , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , Female , France/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Prisoners/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S3-S13, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065044

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The lack of ressources and coordination to face the epidemic of coronavirus raises concerns for the health of patients with mental disorders in a country where we keep in memory the dramatic experience of famine in psychiatric hospitals during the Second World War. This article aims at proposing guidance to ensure mental health care during the SARS-CoV epidemy in France. METHODS: Authors performed a narrative review identifying relevant results in the scientific and medical literature and local initiatives in France. RESULTS: We identified four types of major vulnerabilities in patients suffering from mental disorders during this pandemic: (1) medical comorbidities that are more frequently found in patients suffering from mental disorders (cardiovascular and pulmonary pathologies, diabetes, obesity, etc.) which represent risk factors for severe infections with Covid-19; (2) age (the elderly constituting the population most vulnerable to coronavirus); (3) cognitive and behavioral troubles which can hamper compliance with confinement and hygiene measures and finally and (4) psychosocial vulnerability due to stigmatization and/or socio-economic difficulties. Furthermore, the mental health healthcare system is more vulnerable than other healthcare systems. Current government plans are poorly adapted to psychiatric establishments in a context of major shortage of organizational, material and human resources. In addition, a certain number of structural aspects make the psychiatric institution particularly vulnerable: many beds are closed, wards have a high density of patients, mental health community facilities are closed, medical teams are understaffed and poorly trained to face infectious diseases. We could also face major issues in referring patients with acute mental disorders to intensive care units. To maintain continuity of psychiatric care in this pandemic situation, several directions can be considered, in particular with the creation of Covid+ units. These units are under the dual supervision of a psychiatrist and of an internist/infectious disease specialist; all new entrants should be placed in quarantine for 14 days; the nurse staff should benefit from specific training, from daily medical check-ups and from close psychological support. Family visits would be prohibited and replaced by videoconference. At the end of hospitalization, in particular for the population of patients in compulsory ambulatory care situations, specific case-management should be organized with the possibility of home visits, in order to support them when they get back home and to help them to cope with the experience of confinement, which is at risk to induce recurrences of mental disorders. The total or partial closure of mental health community facilities is particularly disturbing for patients but a regular follow-up is possible with telemedicine and should include the monitoring of the suicide risk and psychoeducation strategies; developing support platforms could also be very helpful in this context. Private psychiatrists have also a crucial role of information with their patients on confinement and barrier measures, but also on measures to prevent the psychological risks inherent to confinement: maintenance of sleep regularity, physical exercise, social interactions, stress management and coping strategies, prevention of addictions, etc. They should also be trained to prevent, detect and treat early warning symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, because their prevalence was high in the regions of China most affected by the pandemic. DISCUSSION: French mental healthcare is now in a great and urgent need for reorganization and must also prepare in the coming days and weeks to face an epidemic of emotional disorders due to the containment of the general population.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aftercare , Age Factors , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Child , Cognition Disorders/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/therapy , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Drug Interactions , France/epidemiology , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Hospitals, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Health Services/supply & distribution , Patient Care Team , Patient Compliance , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prisoners/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/therapy , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Suicide/prevention & control , Vulnerable Populations
8.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1150): 532-538, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052328

ABSTRACT

In early 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic swept through the UK and had a major impact on healthcare services. The Birmingham hand centre, one of the largest hand trauma units in the country, underwent a dramatic service reconfiguration to enable robust and safe provision of care that would withstand the peak of the pandemic. Streamlining our service significantly reduced patient footfall and hospital admission while preventing intra-hospital viral transmission. Many of the changes implemented have been kept as permanent adjustments to our practice as this new model of care yields higher patient satisfaction and efficacy to withstand the pressures of further peaks in the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Orthopedics/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Pathways , Hand/surgery , Hospitals, University , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation , Triage , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 73: 97-106, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046566

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to report the changes and adaptations of a vascular tertiary center during a global pandemic and the impact on its activity and patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study within the Vascular Surgery ward in Centro Hospitalar Universitário Lisboa Norte, Portugal. All data from surgical, inpatient and outpatient activity were collected from February to June 2020 and compared to the same 5-month period in 2018 and 2019. We ran a descriptive analysis of all data and performed statistical tests for the variation of procedures and admissions between February and June 2018 and the same time period in 2020. RESULTS: During the outbreak, our staff had to be readapted. Six nurses were transferred to COVID-19 units (out of a total of 33 nurses) while 1 of the 7 residents was transferred to an intensive care unit and 1 senior surgeon was put on prophylactic leave. In the outpatient clinic, there was an increase in the number of telemedicine consultations with a greater focus on first-time referrals and urgent cases. There was a significant increase in the total number of elective admissions whereas there were significantly less admissions from an emergency setting (+57% and -54%, respectively, P < 0.001). The vascular surgery team performed a total number of 584 procedures between February and June 2020 (-17.8% compared to 2018 and 2019), with a significant increase in the number of endovascular procedures (P < 0.001) and in the use of local and regional anesthesia (P < 0.001), especially in the Angio Suite (+600%, P < 0.001). Comparing with 2018 and 2019, the surgical team performed less outpatient procedures in early 2020. We reported a significant increase in the total number of procedures for patients with a chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) diagnosis (+21%, P < 0.001). We did not report significant changes in the proportion of other vascular conditions. Regarding mortality, we observed a 16% decrease in the intraoperative mortality (P 0.67). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we assessed the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak in daily activity during the contingency period. During the outbreak, there was an overall decline in outpatient clinics and inpatient admissions. Nevertheless, and despite the restrictions imposed by the pandemic and health authorities, we managed to maintain most procedures for most vascular diseases, particularly for CLTI urgent cases, without a significant increase in the mortality rate. Stringent protective measures for patient and staff or higher use of endovascular techniques and local anesthesia are some of the successful changes implemented in the department. These learned lessons are to be pursued as the pandemic evolves with future outbreaks of COVID-19, such as the current second outbreak currently spreading through Europe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Administration , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Portugal , Retrospective Studies , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology , Vascular Diseases/mortality , Vascular Diseases/surgery , Vascular Surgical Procedures/organization & administration
10.
Am Surg ; 86(12): 1623-1628, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 put a stop to the operative experience of surgical residents, leaving reassignment of the team, to the frontlines. Each program has adapted uniquely; we discuss how our surgical education changed in our hospital. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review of changes in general surgery cases, bedside procedures, and utilization of residents before and during the pandemic. Procedures were retrieved from electronic medical records. Operating room (OR) cases 1 month before and 5 weeks after the executive order were collected. Triple lumen catheter (TLC), temporary hemodialysis catheter (HDC), and pneumothorax catheter (PC) insertions by surgical residents were recorded for 5 weeks. RESULTS: Before the pandemic, an average of 27.9 cases were done in the OR, with an average of 10.1 general surgery cases. From March 23 to April 30, 2020, the average number of cases decreased to 5.1, and general surgery cases decreased to 2.2. Elective, urgent, and emergent cases represented 83%, 14.6%, and 2.4% prior to the order and 66.7%, 15.1%, and 18.2%, respectively, after the order. Bedside procedures over 5 weeks totaled to 153, 93 TLCs, 39 HDCs, and 21 PCs. CONCLUSION: Repurposing the surgical department for the concerns of the pandemic has involved all surgical staff. We worked with other departments to allocate our team to areas of need and re-evaluated daily. The strengths of our team to deliver care and perform many bedside procedures allowed us to meet the demands posed by this disease while remaining as a cohesive unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery/education , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299 , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , New York/epidemiology , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Pandemics , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data
11.
Rev Esp Enferm Dig ; 113(2): 119-121, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006406

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic meant that the population-based colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs had to be suspended. Modifications were made to the organization in order to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission. We report the experience of the Galician CRC screening program and patient safety results. Endoscopy was suspended between 13/03/2020 and 11/05/2020. After resumption, a total of 3,310 colonoscopies were performed (1,702 positive fecal occult blood tests and 1,608 endoscopy monitoring) and no SARS-CoV-2 infections were detected in the subsequent two weeks. Thus, resumption of activity associated with population screening was safe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Patient Safety , Quarantine , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Middle Aged , Spain/epidemiology
12.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 78(6): 609-616, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999891

ABSTRACT

Confronted with the COVID-19 crisis, healthcare professionals have had to tackle an epidemic crisis of a huge magnitude for which they were not prepared. Medical laboratories have been on the front line, from collecting samples to performing the analysis required to diagnose this new pathology. Responding to the needs and to the urgency of the situation, the authorities relied on the network of private laboratories. In France, private laboratory medicine represents 70% of overall activity, and with a network of more than 4,000 local laboratories, private laboratory medicine has been the cornerstone of the « screen-trace-isolate ¼ strategy. This article gives feedback from private laboratory medicine professionals, directly involved in the reorganization carried out at the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical stages, during the crisis from March to October 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Services/organization & administration , Pandemics , Private Sector/organization & administration , Specimen Handling/standards , COVID-19/diagnosis , Clinical Laboratory Services/standards , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/instrumentation , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Equipment Safety/methods , Equipment Safety/standards , France/epidemiology , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Intersectoral Collaboration , Medical Staff/organization & administration , Medical Staff/standards , Patient Safety/standards , Pre-Analytical Phase/methods , Pre-Analytical Phase/standards , Private Sector/standards , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Specimen Handling/methods
13.
Soins Psychiatr ; 41(331): 16-20, 2020.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997650

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 health crisis forced Charles-Perrens General Hospital in Bordeaux to convert a conventional psychiatric unit into a specific unit to care for patients with mental disorders who are potentially infected with the SARS-Cov-2 virus. Resources and competences from across the hospital were mobilised to enable the unit's health professionals to accomplish this mission. This article looks back at the experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , France/epidemiology , Humans
15.
Pflege ; 33(4): 247-255, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982157

ABSTRACT

Between dream and distress - Setting up and running a cohort ward for COVID-19 Patients at an acute hospital - A case study Abstract. Background: In the context of the pandemic, hospitals must be able to care for COVID-19 patients within a very short timeframe. OBJECTIVE: Description of the setting up of a cohort ward for patients with COVID-19 on a surgical ward including the development of the nursing team. METHODS: The intrinsic retrospective case study describes the situation, identifies special phenomena in a reflective manner and links them to existing knowledge. Data were anecdotal, routine data were collected in the context of nursing practice development. RESULTS: Setting up the cohort ward in a Swiss hospital consisted of structural and technical planning, infection control measures, the establishment of interprofessional structures, and internal communication. During the four-week operation, 71 patients were treated. The use of practice development methodology initiated a cultural change. The reflection describes a field of tension between "dream and distress": As a dream, the lived experience of optimal care, with well-functioning processes, sufficient material, sufficient personnel and a very good interprofessional cooperation was evaluated. Distress in the form of high infection rates as well as psychological and physical stress did not occur. After the cohort ward was closed, there was a risk working back in normal operations based on existing economical and organizational conditions, with the knowledge that a different cooperation and organization is possible. CONCLUSIONS: Positive experiences from the "crisis mode" should be used to further develop essential operations during normal times.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , Retrospective Studies , Switzerland/epidemiology
16.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 36(2): 105-111, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954424

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Proning intubated intensive care unit patients for the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome is an accepted standard of practice. We examined the nursing climate in 4 units and its impact on implementing a novel self-proning protocol to treat COVID-19 patients outside the intensive care unit. LOCAL PROBLEM: Nursing units previously designated for medical/surgical populations had to adjust quickly to provide evidence-based care for COVID-19 patients attempting self-proning. METHODS: Nurses from 4 nursing units were surveyed about the implementation process on the self-proning protocol. Their perception of unit implementation was assessed via the Implementation Climate Scale. INTERVENTIONS: A new self-proning nursing protocol was implemented outside the intensive care unit. RESULTS: Consistent education on the protocol, belief in the effectiveness of the intervention, and a strong unit-based climate of evidence-based practice contributed to greater implementation of the protocol. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a new nursing protocol is possible with strong unit-based support, even during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Nursing Assessment/organization & administration , Patient Positioning/nursing , Prone Position , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chicago/epidemiology , Evidence-Based Nursing/organization & administration , Health Care Surveys , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers
17.
Neurology ; 95(13): 583-592, 2020 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-945310

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic epicenter in Bronx, NY, the Montefiore Neuroscience Center required rapid and drastic changes when considering the delivery of neurologic care, health and safety of staff, and continued education and safety for house staff. Health care leaders rely on principles that can be in conflict during a disaster response such as this pandemic, with equal commitments to ensure the best care for those stricken with COVID-19, provide high-quality care and advocacy for patients and families coping with neurologic disease, and advocate for the health and safety of health care teams, particularly house staff and colleagues who are most vulnerable. In our attempt to balance these principles, over 3 weeks, we reformatted our inpatient neuroscience services by reducing from 4 wards to just 1, in the following weeks delivering care to over 600 hospitalized patients with neuro-COVID and over 1,742 total neuroscience hospital bed days. This description from members of our leadership team provides an on-the-ground account of our effort to respond nimbly to a complex and evolving surge of patients with COVID in a large urban hospital network. Our efforts were based on (1) strategies to mitigate exposure and transmission, (2) protection of the health and safety of staff, (3) alleviation of logistical delays and strains in the system, and (4) facilitating coordinated communication. Each center's experience will add to knowledge of best practices, and emerging research will help us gain insights into an evidence-based approach to neurologic care during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Neurology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Ambulatory Care , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Delivery of Health Care , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Hospitalization , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurology/education , Neuroscience Nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Text Messaging
18.
Radiologia (Engl Ed) ; 63(2): 170-179, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943578

ABSTRACT

This paper aims to describe our experience in an interventional radiology unit in a hospital in Spain that was severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. To this end, we did a prospective observational study of 20 consecutive patients with COVID-19 who underwent 21 interventional radiology procedures between March 13, 2020 and May 11, 2020. We describe the measures taken to reorganize the work and protective measures, as well as the repercussions of the situation on our unit's overall activity and activity in different phases. The COVID-19 pandemic has represented a challenge in our daily work, but learning from our own experience and the recommendations of the Spanish radiological societies (SERVEI and SERAM) has enabled us to adapt successfully. Our activity dropped only 22% compared to the same period in 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Radiology, Interventional/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Humans , Prospective Studies , Spain
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