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1.
Inquiry ; 59: 469580211055621, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784978

ABSTRACT

By September 20, 2021, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been pandemic in 237 countries and regions, resulting in 228,506,698 confirmed cases and 4,692,361 deaths. At the same time, a total of 1123 cases of COVID-19 had been confirmed in Beijing, China. Peking University Shougang Hospital has 4 community hospitals with 174 staff members, covering 230,000 residents in Shijingshan district, Beijing. The community hospitals were the basic units of China's healthcare system for public health services, as the main battlefield for screening and controlling of COVID-19. We reported our experience about the prevention of SARS-CoV-2. We suggest that community hospitals should change their process for admitting patients. While the screening of suspected cases of COVID-19 is vital, patients with suspected infections should be isolated immediately.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Beijing/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Hospitals, Community , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(2)2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784847

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients were apprehensive to seek acute care resulting in delayed diagnoses of serious conditions and reduction in emergency room (ER) visits by 50% in the Fraser Health Authority. Patients who did present to the ER left prior to their results being available and some refused admission and critical treatments.At the Chilliwack General Hospital ER, a virtual care clinic was established to follow-up on patients after their initial ER visit, providing test results and ensuring patients are not clinically deteriorating at home. Specific criteria were created for safe referral to virtual follow-up. For 2 hours daily, an ER physician contacts selected patients by telephone to provide a virtual follow-up based on the patients' needs.Through the emergency department virtual care (EVC) pilot project, from May 14 to August 31, 2020, on average 58 telehealth visits were conducted weekly, with 19% of visits reaching unattached patients without a regular primary care provider. A patient survey revealed that 75% of respondents were very satisfied or satisfied with telephone virtual care as a follow-up to their emergency department (ED) visit, while 95% would like to continue to receive telephone follow-up care. Additionally, based on a physician survey, 80% of providers were satisfied or very satisfied with the overall EVC experience. The majority (80%) would like to continue to provide the service. One patient was referred for a virtual care follow-up for imaging results that did not meet the referral criteria; the patient was diagnosed with a perforated appendicitis. They had an atypical presentation of abdominal pain and their care was delayed by several hours than if they were to present to the ED for in-person follow-up. The process and referral criteria may require minor modification and must be followed strictly to ensure safety and efficiency in providing telehealth follow-up in the acute care setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality Improvement , Aftercare , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Pandemics , Pilot Projects
3.
West J Emerg Med ; 23(2): 129-133, 2022 Jan 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1737292

ABSTRACT

Since early 2020, the world has been living through coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Westchester County, New York, was one of the hardest and earliest hit places in the United States. Working within a community emergency department amid the rise of a highly infectious disease such as COVID-19 presented many challenges, including appropriate isolation, adequate testing, personnel shortages, supply shortfalls, facility changes, and resource allocation. Here we discuss our process in navigating these complexities, including the practice changes implemented within our institution to counter these unprecedented issues. These adjustments included establishing three outdoor tents to serve as triage areas; creating overflow intensive care units through conversion of areas that had previously served as the ambulatory surgery unit, post-anesthesia care unit, and endoscopy suite; increasing critical care staff to meet unprecedented need; anticipating and adapting to medical supply shortages; and adjusting resident physician roles to meet workflow requirements. By analyzing and improving upon the processes delineated below, our healthcare system should be better prepared for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Triage , United States/epidemiology
4.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264976, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731603

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on ophthalmic outpatient numbers and ophthalmic diagnosis distribution in a community hospital (Taipei City Hospital Zhongxiao Branch) in Taiwan. The COVID-19 pandemic period in Taiwan was defined as May 1 to July 31, 2021. Demographic data, including age, gender, and top 10 diagnoses from ophthalmic outpatients during this period, were collected. A corresponding control group from the same time in 2020 was also collected. The distribution of different diagnoses was analyzed, and the data of 10 most prominent diagnoses with decreased percentage of case numbers during the COVID-19 pandemic period were obtained. The number of cases during the COVID-19 pandemic decreased by 46.9% compared to the control group. The top three most common diagnoses were dry eye syndrome, glaucoma, and macular diseases. The 10 most prominent diagnoses with decreased number of cases during the COVID-19 pandemic were cataract, refraction & accommodation, macular degeneration, conjunctivitis, retinal detachment, vitreous body disorders, ophthalmic complications of diabetes mellitus, glaucoma, dry eye, and retinal vein occlusion. Identifying and treating these patients as scheduled may yield the highest cost-benefit effect in preventing visual loss during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Cataract/diagnosis , Cataract/epidemiology , Dry Eye Syndromes/diagnosis , Dry Eye Syndromes/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Female , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Taiwan/epidemiology
5.
CMAJ Open ; 10(1): E137-E145, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1705152

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 can cause outbreaks in community- and hospital-based settings. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed epidemiologic account of a hospital-wide SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and provide a description of case evaluations, transmission networks and the interventions implemented to stem the outbreak. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of a hospital-wide SARS-CoV-2 outbreak at the Misericordia Community Hospital (Edmonton) from June 21 to Aug. 14, 2020. We reviewed hospital chart, public health and occupational health records to determine demographics, case type (community- or hospital-acquired), need for critical care and outcome for each case linked to the outbreak (patients, hospital staff, and community and patient visitors). We developed detailed transmission networks using epidemiologic data to determine what variables may have contributed to transmission. RESULTS: Fifty-eight cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were linked to this hospital outbreak (31 patients, 25 staff members and 2 visitors; 66% female, age range 19-97 years). One patient required critical care, and 11 deaths were recorded (all among inpatients). Most cases were hospital-acquired (91%), and 28% were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis. The outbreak was composed of 2 clusters driven by protective equipment breaches, premature removal of precautions, transmission in small staff quarters and infection of a staff member after exposure to a wandering patient with dementia and asymptomatic, undetected SARS-CoV-2 infection. INTERPRETATION: A detailed epidemiologic review of this hospital-wide outbreak shows that a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak can involve complex transmission chains and clusters. Multipronged bundled approaches, aggressive contact tracing, and patient and staff prevalence screening are important to help bring such outbreaks under control, along with ongoing vigilance in detecting delayed cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Contact Tracing , Cross Infection , Female , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Public Health Surveillance , Retrospective Studies
6.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 164, 2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677509

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: April 22nd, 2020, New York City (NYC) was the epicenter of the pandemic of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the US with differences of death rates among its 5 boroughs. We aimed to investigate the difference in mortality associated with hospital factors (teaching versus community hospital) in NYC. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: We obtained medical records of 6509 hospitalized patients with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 from the Mount Sinai Health System including 4 teaching hospitals in Manhattan and 2 community hospitals located outside of Manhattan (Queens and Brooklyn) retrospectively. Propensity score analysis using inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) with stabilized weights was performed to adjust for differences in the baseline characteristics of patients initially presenting to teaching or community hospitals, and those who were transferred from community hospitals to teaching hospitals. RESULTS: Among 6509 patients, 4653 (72.6%) were admitted in teaching hospitals, 1462 (22.8%) were admitted in community hospitals, and 293 (4.6%) were originally admitted in community and then transferred into teaching hospitals. Patients in community hospitals had higher mortality (42.5%) than those in teaching hospitals (17.6%) or those transferred from community to teaching hospitals (23.5%, P < 0.001). After IPTW-adjustment, when compared to patients cared for at teaching hospitals, the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of mortality were as follows: community hospitals 2.47 (2.03-2.99); transfers 0.80 (0.58-1.09)). CONCLUSIONS: Patients admitted to community hospitals had higher mortality than those admitted to teaching hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Community , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
7.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 41(1): 53-62, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616163

ABSTRACT

There is relatively little contemporary information regarding clinical characteristics of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia (PAB) in the community hospital setting. This was a retrospective, observational cohort study examining the clinical characteristics of patients with PAB across several community hospitals in the USA with a focus on the appropriateness of initial empirical therapy and impact on patient outcomes. Cases of PAB occurring between 2016 and 2019 were pulled from 8 community medical centers. Patients were classified as having either positive or negative outcome at hospital discharge. Several variables including receipt of active empiric therapy (AET) and the time to receiving AET were collected. Variables with a p value of < 0.05 in univariate analyses were included in a multivariable logistic regression model. Two hundred and eleven episodes of PAB were included in the analysis. AET was given to 81.5% of patients and there was no difference in regard to outcome (p = 0.62). There was no difference in the median time to AET in patients with a positive or negative outcome (p = 0.53). After controlling for other variables, age, Pitt bacteremia score ≥ 4, and septic shock were independently associated with a negative outcome. A high proportion of patients received timely, active antimicrobial therapy for PAB and time to AET did not have a significant impact on patient outcome.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects , Aged , Bacteremia/microbiology , Female , Hospitals, Community/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification , Pseudomonas aeruginosa/physiology , Retrospective Studies
9.
J Infect Chemother ; 28(4): 539-542, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587256

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The effectiveness of several vaccines against coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been reported in the real-world setting. However, it is still unknown how long antibodies persist following vaccination and whether or not the persistence of antibodies has a protective effect against COVID-19. METHODS: Healthcare workers who had received two doses of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine were enrolled, and a single-center study was conducted at the National Hospital Organization Hakodate National Hospital. Serum samples from all participants were collected 13-21 weeks (median: 20 weeks) after the second dose of vaccination. The antibody titers were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S). Data on characteristics of the participants were gathered from patient records and interview sheets. RESULTS: A total of 401 participants, among whom 70.1% were women and the median age was 42 years, were evaluated in this study. None of the participants had a definite COVID-19 history, and all participants who received complete vaccination showed positive antibody titers. The antibody titer was observed to be higher in participants with younger age (p < 0.001) and those who were females (p = 0.028). Despite the higher risk of infection than that of the general public, no vaccinated staff developed breakthrough infections. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the significant contribution of the BNT162b2 vaccine in the acquisition of anti-SARS-CoV-2S antibodies; therefore, the general population should benefit from these two vaccine doses, which are expected to be protective for at least five months.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Japan , RNA, Messenger , Vaccination
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e046676, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495458

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to explore the seroprevalence of hospital staff comparing to preprocedural patients in Thai community hospitals to shed light on the situation of COVID-19 infection of frontline healthcare workers in low infection rate countries where mass screening was not readily available. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: 52 community hospitals in 35 provinces covered all regions of Thailand. PARTICIPANTS: 857 participants consisted of 675 hospital staff and 182 preprocedural patients. OUTCOME MEASURE: COVID-19 seroprevalence using a locally developed rapid IgM/IgG test kit RESULTS: Overall, 5.5% of the participants (47 of 857) had positive IgM, 0.2% (2 of 857) had positive IgG which both of them also had positive IgM. Hospitals located in the central part of Thailand had the highest IgM seroprevalence (11.9%). Preprocedural patients had a higher rate of positive IgM than the hospital staff (12.1% vs 3.7%). Participants with present upper respiratory tract symptoms had a higher rate of positive IgM than those without (9.6% vs 4.5%). Three quarters (80.5%, 690 of 857) of the participants were asymptomatic, of which, 31 had positive IgM (4.5%) which consisted of 20 of 566 healthcare workers (3.5%) and 11 of 124 preprocedural patients (8.9%). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 antibody test could detect a substantial number of potential silent spreaders in Thai community hospitals where the nasopharyngeal PCR was not readily available, and the antigen test was prohibited. Antibody testing should be encouraged for mass screening in a limited resource setting, especially in asymptomatic individuals. TRIAL REGISTRATION: TCTR20200426002.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Thailand/epidemiology
11.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 18(11): 1506-1509, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439356
12.
Vaccine ; 39(42): 6183-6185, 2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428538

ABSTRACT

In the United States, clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines and therapeutics quickly exhausted available clinical research capacity at large medical centers. The NIAID Division of Clinical Research tapped community hospitals to help fill the gap.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergencies , COVID-19 Vaccines , Government , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
13.
Bratisl Lek Listy ; 122(9): 680-683, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380032

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of telemedicine visits, compared to in-person visits, on patient satisfaction in an established community hospital-based multidisciplinary central nervous system (CNS) clinic. METHODS: Telemedicine options - virtual visits and teleconferencing - were introduced in July 2020. Both radiation oncologist and neurosurgeon were simultaneously present for the telemedicine visit. Descriptive patient demographics, survey responses, and travel time and distance calculations were analyzed. Satisfaction score was compared to previously published data. RESULTS: A total of twenty-five telemedicine visits (n=22 video; n=3 phone) were completed since July 2020. Patient demographics are as follows: mean age was 59 years (range=22-81), women (9) and men (16), repeat telemedicine visits n=10, malignant CNS disease (17) and benign disease (5). Mean one-way distance traveled was 165.07 miles (median=114; range=0.8-358). Mean roundtrip travel time was estimated at 5h 5min. Mean telemedicine visit duration was 15.3 mins (range=4-46). Mean patient satisfaction score for telemedicine visits was 4.84. CONCLUSION: Patients who opted for the telemedicine visits found them just as effective as in-person visits, saving time and travel costs as well as ensuring patient safety during the current COVID-19 pandemic. The telemedicine visit platform facilitates the multidisciplinary clinic model and should be considered for more widespread utilization (Tab. 3, Fig. 1, Ref. 18).


Subject(s)
Neurosurgery , Radiation Oncology , Telemedicine , COVID-19 , Central Nervous System , Female , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction
14.
Am J Emerg Med ; 50: 129-131, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330533

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Monoclonal antibodies received an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for the outpatient treatment of mild to moderate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). REGN-COV2, casirivimab and imdevimab, has been shown to decrease the viral load and healthcare visits of those with mild to moderate COVID-19 who are treated in the outpatient setting. OBJECTIVE: To determine 7- and 14-day emergency department (ED) and hospitalization rates of adult patients given REGN-COV2 for the outpatient treatment of COVID-19 at a community hospital. METHODS: A convenience sample of consecutive adult patients given REGN-COV2 from January 18, 2021 through March 31, 2021 for the outpatient treatment of mild to moderate COVID-19. Abstracted data included patient demographics, allergic reactions, ED presentations and hospitalizations at 7 and 14 days, and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: A total of 68 patients with a medain age of 69 years (IQR 57-75.5) and 58.3% being female were given REGEN-COV2 during the study period. No allergic reactions were noted during infusion. Of those infused, 18% (12/68) were infused in the ED and had a median length of stay of 477 min. Following infusion, 10% (7/68) of patients re-presented to the ED and 2% (1/68) were hospitalized for COVID-19 at 14 days. In those aged 65 years or greater, 12% (5/42) of patients re-presented to the ED following infusion. Of those who re-presented to the emergency department, the median age was 72.5 years and the median time from infusion to re-presentation was 2.0 days. No patients suffered in-hospital mortality during the study period. CONCLUSION: There was a significant length of stay associated with REGN-COV2 infusion in the emergency department. Following REGN-COV2 infusion, few patients under the age of 65 re-presented to the emergency department at seven and 14 days. However, a large number of patients aged over 65 years re-presented to the ED following infusion.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals, Community , Age Factors , Aged , Ambulatory Care , Cohort Studies , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
16.
J Surg Res ; 268: 181-189, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272587

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in New York City, hospitals canceled elective surgeries to increase capacity for critically ill patients. We present case volume data from our community hospital to demonstrate how this shutdown affected surgical care. METHODS: Between March 16 and June 14, 2020, all elective surgeries were canceled at our institution. All procedures performed during this operating room shutdown (ORS) were logged, as well as those 4 weeks before (PRE) and 4 weeks after (POST) for comparison. RESULTS: A total of 2,475 cases were included in our analysis, with 754 occurring during shutdown. Overall case numbers dropped significantly during ORS and increased during recovery (mean 245.0 ± 28.4 PRE versus 58.0 ± 30.9 ORS versus 186.0±19.4 POST cases/wk, P< 0.001). Emergency cases predominated during ORS (26.4% PRE versus 59.3% ORS versus 31.5% POST, P< 0.001) despite decreasing in frequency (mean 64.5 ± 7.9 PRE versus 34.4 ± 12.1 ORS versus 58.5 ± 4.0 POST cases/wk, P< 0.001). Open surgeries remained constant in all three phases (52.2-54.1%), whereas laparoscopic and robotic surgeries decreased (-3.4% and -3.0%, P< 0.001). General and/or vascular surgery, urology, and neurosurgery comprised a greater proportion of caseload (+9.5%, +3.0%, +2.8%), whereas orthopedics, gynecology, and otolaryngology/plastic surgery all decreased proportionally (-5.0%, -4.4%, -5.9%, P< 0.001). CONCLUSION: Operative volume significantly decreased during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Emergency cases predominated during this time, although there were fewer emergency cases overall. General/vascular surgery became the most active service and open surgeries became more common. This reallocation of resources may be useful for future crisis planning among community hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Community , Humans , New York City , Pandemics
17.
Compr Psychiatry ; 110: 152255, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Evidence suggested that traumatic events, including pandemics, can be associated with psychiatric symptoms like increased anxiety and depression. However, there were many unknowns concerning the emergent global coronavirus-19 (COVID-19), including its impact on psychiatric health within the United States. Our study aimed to track trends of mental health problems in individuals who presented with psychiatric complaints in an emergent setting. METHODS: A total of 1776 patients and 1610 patients presented to Emergency Department (ED) with psychiatric complaints between January 1 - July 9 of the years of 2019 and 2020, respectively, in Millcreek Community Hospital (MCH) Erie, PA. This study was an electronic medical record review (EMR), therefore the data were collected exclusively from EMR over the two-year span. ED prevalence was calculated as the number of total psychiatric MCH ED cases divided by the total number of all MCH ED patients, and prevalence ratio (PR) between 2019 and 2020 was used to reflect change of overall ED psychiatric prevalence. RESULTS: Clinical notes revealed increased ED psychiatric chief complaint prevalence, as indicated by a PR greater than one, in multiple categories in comparison to before the COVID-19 outbreak. Concerning primary psychiatric disorders, there was increased ED prevalence in chief complaint of total mood disorders (PR = 1.21) with major depressive disorder (PR = 1.23) and bipolar disorder (PR = 1.47), neurodevelopment disorders (PR = 1.25) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (PR = 1.19) and intellectual disability (PR = 1.52), trauma- and stressor-related disorders (PR = 1.56) with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (PR = 1.39) and adjustment disorder (PR = 1.73), substance abuse and addiction disorders (PR = 1.29), and personality disorders (PR = 1.56). CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic outbreak dramatically impacted mental health in an ER setting. Further research on mental health disparities in conjunction with the COVID-19 pandemic is critical to help predict and address risk for chronic symptoms and sequela to help anticipate and improve psychiatric patient care and well-being during potential future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Mental Disorders , Psychiatry , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals, Community , Humans , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e111, 2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253852

ABSTRACT

The explosive outbreak of COVID-19 led to a shortage of medical resources, including isolation rooms in hospitals, healthcare workers (HCWs) and personal protective equipment. Here, we constructed a new model, non-contact community treatment centres to monitor and quarantine asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic COVID-19 patients who recorded their own vital signs using a smartphone application. This new model in Korea is useful to overcome shortages of medical resources and to minimise the risk of infection transmission to HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Design and Construction/methods , Hospitals, Community/methods , Adult , Female , Hospitals, Community/classification , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quarantine/methods , Republic of Korea , Self-Care Units
19.
Chest ; 160(5): 1714-1728, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248853

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in unprecedented adjustments to ICU organization and care processes globally. RESEARCH QUESTIONS: Did hospital emergency responses to the COVID-19 pandemic differ depending on hospital setting? Which strategies worked well to mitigate strain as perceived by intensivists? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Between August and November 2020, we carried out semistructured interviews of intensivists from tertiary and community hospitals across six regions in the United States that experienced early or large surges of COVID-19 patients, or both. We identified themes of hospital emergency responses using the four S framework of acute surge planning: space, staff, stuff, system. RESULTS: Thirty-three intensivists from seven tertiary and six community hospitals participated. Clinicians across both settings believed that canceling elective surgeries was helpful to increase ICU capabilities and that hospitals should establish clearly defined thresholds at which surgeries are limited during future surge events. ICU staff was the most limited resource; staff shortages were improved by the use of tiered staffing models, just-in-time training for non-ICU clinicians, designated treatment teams, and deployment of trainees. Personal protective equipment (PPE) shortages and reuse were widespread, causing substantial distress among clinicians; hands-on PPE training was helpful to reduce clinicians' anxiety. Transparency and involvement of frontline clinicians as stakeholders were important components of effective emergency responses and helped to maintain trust among staff. INTERPRETATION: We identified several strategies potentially to mitigate strain as perceived by intensivists working in both tertiary and community hospital settings. Our study also demonstrated the importance of trust and transparency between frontline staff and hospital leadership as key components of effective emergency responses during public health crises.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Workforce , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Physicians , Arizona , California , Critical Care Nursing , Elective Surgical Procedures , Equipment Reuse , Female , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Humans , Internship and Residency , Leadership , Louisiana , Male , Michigan , New York , Nurses/supply & distribution , Organizational Policy , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Process Assessment, Health Care , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Stakeholder Participation , Surge Capacity , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Washington
20.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(5): 600-603, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233672

ABSTRACT

We performed a cross-sectional survey of infection preventionists in 60 US community hospitals between April 22 and May 8, 2020. Several differences in hospital preparedness for SARS-CoV-2 emerged with respect to personal protective equipment conservation strategies, protocols related to testing, universal masking, and restarting elective procedures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Resources/supply & distribution , Hospitals, Community/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2
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