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1.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(12): e28610, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591657

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inequities in access to health services are a global concern and a concern for Canadian populations living in rural areas. Rural children hospitalized at tertiary children's hospitals have higher rates of medical complexity and experience more expensive hospitalizations and more frequent readmissions. The 2 tertiary pediatric hospitals in Alberta, Canada, have already been operating above capacity, but the pediatric beds at regional hospitals are underused. Such imbalance could lead to poor patient safety and increased readmission risk at tertiary pediatric hospitals and diminish the clinical exposure of regional pediatric health care providers, erode their confidence, and compel health systems to further reduce the capacity at regional sites. A Telemedicine Rounding and Consultation for Kids (TRaC-K) model was proposed to enable health care providers at Alberta Children's Hospital to partner with their counterparts at Medicine Hat Regional Hospital to provide inpatient clinical care for pediatric patients who would otherwise have to travel or be transferred to the tertiary site. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to identify perceived barriers and enablers to implementing the TRaC-K model. METHODS: This study was guided by the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) and used qualitative methods. We collected qualitative data from 42 participants from tertiary and regional hospitals through 31 semistructured interviews and 2 focus groups. These data were thematically analyzed to identify major subthemes within each TDF domain. These subthemes were further aggregated and categorized into barriers or enablers to implementing the TRaC-K model and were tabulated separately. RESULTS: Our study identified 31 subthemes in 14 TDF domains, ranging from administrative issues to specific clinical conditions. We were able to merge these subthemes into larger themes and categorize them into 4 barriers and 4 enablers. Our findings showed that the barriers were lack of awareness of telemedicine, skills to provide virtual clinical care, unclear processes and resources to support TRaC-K, and concerns about clear roles and responsibilities. The enablers were health care providers' motivation to provide care closer to home, supporting system resource stewardship, site and practice compatibility, and motivation to strengthen tertiary-regional relationships. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic inquiry into the perceived barriers and enablers to the implementation of TRaC-K helped us to gain insights from various health care providers' and family members' perspectives. We will use these findings to design interventions to overcome the identified barriers and harness the enablers to encourage successful implementation of TRaC-K. These findings will inform the implementation of telemedicine-based interventions in pediatric settings in other parts of Canada and beyond. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s12913-018-3859-2.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Alberta , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Qualitative Research , Referral and Consultation
2.
J Trop Pediatr ; 67(6)2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590287

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This descriptive study aimed to compare the clinical and laboratory features of the children with the multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), requiring pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), admission with the MIS-C patients who did not require PICU admission. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study was conducted between March 2020 and February 2021 at the University of Health Sciences Dr. Behçet Uz Children's Hospital, a referral center for pediatric infectious diseases in the Aegean Region of Turkey. All hospitalized patients aged 18 years old or less with MIS-C according to the definition of the universal guidelines were included in the study. Data of the patients with the diagnosis of MIS-C were recorded and collected from the electronic medical records of the hospital. The data included demographic characteristics, presenting signs and symptoms, laboratory findings and clinical data. RESULTS: A total of 58 patients with MIS-C were included in this study. Thirty-eight (65.5%) patients were male. The median age was 6 years (2 months-16 years). The patients admitted to PICU were 15 (25.9%). The rate of pulmonary involvement was 81.3% (n = 13) in the PICU group. The median procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, D-Dimer and ferritin values were significantly higher in the PICU group compared to non-PICU group (p < 0.001, p = 0.02, p < 0.001, p = 0.006 and p = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: Besides the depressing cardiac functions reported before, the pulmonary involvement and signs of shock are important factors for PICU admission in children with MIS-C.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Retrospective Studies
3.
Hosp Pediatr ; 12(1): e8-e15, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575792

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Literature suggests that funding for pediatric clinical trials is inequitably awarded. Furthermore, although coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affected all hospitals, institutions with already limited resources were more severely impacted. We hypothesized that there would be difference in schools and hospitals that were able to participate in the initial round of pediatric COVID-19 clinical research. METHODS: We searched online databases for preregistered studies using the keywords "COVID-19," "COVID," "SARS-CoV-2," "2019-nCov," "2019 novel coronavirus," and "severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2." Search results were limited to studies enrolling participants from birth to 17 years, studies started in 2020, and studies originating in the United states. We calculated the proportion of institutions with active COVID-19 pediatric clinical studies in 2020 and compared institutional characteristics between institutions with and without at least one qualifying COVID-19 study, using rank-sum tests, χ2 tests, or Fisher's exact tests, as appropriate. RESULTS: We identified 150 allopathic medical schools, 34 osteopathic medical schools, and 178 children's hospitals meeting inclusion criteria. Among included institutions, 25% of medical schools and 20% children's hospitals participated in 1 of the registered pediatric COVID-19 studies the year before the study period. Institutions that participated in pediatric COVID-19 studies had more publications, more National Institutes of Health funding, and more studies registered on Clinicaltrials.gov in 2019. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the pandemic affecting everyone, participation in early clinical research on the impact of COVID-19 in pediatric populations was concentrated in a few well-resourced institutions that were highly experienced in research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , United States
4.
J Prev Med Hyg ; 62(3): E592-E597, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574106

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) Protection from virus exposure in children's hospital is a pivotal aspect of SARS-COV-2 pandemic control. Healthcare workers (HCW) could play an important role in viral infection in-hospital spread. Infection control measures were thus implemented to protect fragile patients and healthcare workers.We retrospectively described a HCW infectionscase-series due to SARS-CoV-2 from February 24th to July 31stat the IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini. Seven separate cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were observed among healthcare workers, with a total of 395 contacts, and 23 (6%) secondary case. A program of contact tracing and quarantine of SARS-CoV-2 positive HCW, screening of asymptomatic HCW, use of surgical masks, hand hygiene, social distancing and use of PPE in COVID-19 cases assistance prevented the spread of the virus to patients and blocked the diffusion within the hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Hygiene , Child , Contact Tracing , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Masks , Physical Distancing , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med ; 29(Special Issue): 1343-1349, 2021 Aug.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524926

ABSTRACT

The article presents an analysis of the work of the largest children's COVID-19 center in Moscow, organized on the basis of the Children's City Clinical Hospital named after Z. A. Bashlyaeva of the Moscow City Health Department. From March to November 2020 at the COVID-19 Center were hospitalized 2,837 patients with suspected/confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, in total in 2020 1,876 children with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 were treated, 58 (3%) children were in serious condition in the intensive care unit, of which children 11-18 years old were 25%. At the 2020 neonatal COVID-19 center, 215 newborns were observed with suspected COVID-19 diagnosis. The diagnosis of COVID-19 was confirmed in 18 children, while 8 newborns came from the home of COVID-19. In the Center for rehabilitation, where children aged 0 to 3 years old who were born with very low and extremely low body weight are observed, dispensary observation for children who have undergone COVID-19 is organized. 45 children who were observed fell ill with the new coronavirus infection. There were no deaths among children with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 570, 2021 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511746

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the COVID-19 pandemic heightened, infection control and prevention experts recommended clinical training opportunities be modified or discontinued, substantially impacting the function of clinical or medical teaching units (CTU). A CTU is structured to involve medical learners such that they become active participants of the health care team. Since a review of the literature demonstrates a paucity of data to guide pediatric CTU implementation during pandemic phases, we developed and disseminated a survey to assess Canadian practices. METHOD: A group of infectious disease specialists and pediatric hospitalists developed, tested, and disseminated surveys to understand CTU clinical rounding and teaching practices during the waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULT: Our surveys demonstrate the variability in adapting rounding practices during this pandemic and highlights the opportunities to share our approaches and lessons learned to optimize learner experience and patient centered care during unprecedented times in our academic hospitals. We also show the pragmatic implementation of our new pediatric hospital CTU process that was informed by our survey results. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates the variability in adapting rounding practices during this pandemic and highlights the opportunities to share our approaches and lessons learned to optimize learner experience and patient centered care during unprecedented times in our academic hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Canada/epidemiology , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e054510, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1507057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To present Australia-wide data on paediatric COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndromes to inform health service provision and vaccination prioritisation. DESIGN: Prospective, multicentre cohort study. SETTING: Eight tertiary paediatric hospitals across six Australian states and territories in an established research surveillance network-Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease (PAEDS). PARTICIPANTS: All children aged <19 years with SARS-CoV-2 infection including COVID-19, Paediatric Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome Temporally Associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) and Kawasaki-like disease TS infection (KD-TS) treated at a PAEDS site from 24 March 2020 to 31 December 2020. INTERVENTION: Laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. MAIN OUTCOME: Incidence of severe disease among children with COVID-19, PIMS-TS and KD-TS. We also compared KD epidemiology before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Among 386 children with SARS-CoV-2 infection, 381 (98.7%) had COVID-19 (median 6.3 years (IQR 2.1-12.8),53.3% male) and 5 (1.3%) had multisystem inflammatory syndromes (PIMS-TS, n=4; KD-TS, n=1) (median 7.9 years (IQR 7.8-9.8)). Most children with COVID-19 (n=278; 73%) were Australian-born from jurisdictions with highest community transmission. Comorbidities were present in 72 (18.9%); cardiac and respiratory comorbidities were most common (n=32/72;44%). 37 (9.7%) children with COVID-19 were hospitalised, and two (0.5%) required intensive care. Postinfective inflammatory syndromes (PIMS-TS/KD-TS) were uncommon (n=5; 1.3%), all were hospitalised and three (3/5; 60%) required intensive care management. All children recovered and there were no deaths. KD incidence remained stable during the pandemic compared with prepandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Most children with COVID-19 had mild disease. Severe disease was less frequent than reported in high prevalence settings. Preventative strategies, such as vaccination, including children and adolescents, could reduce both the acute and postinfective manifestations of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
8.
Virol J ; 18(1): 159, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The multifaceted non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) taken during the COVID-19 pandemic not only decrease the spreading of the SARS-CoV-2, but have impact on the prevalence of other viruses. This study aimed to explore the prevalence of common respiratory viruses among hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Respiratory specimens were obtained from children with LRTI at Children's Hospital of Fudan University for detection of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1 to 3, influenza virus A (FluA), influenza virus B (FluB), human metapneumovirus (MPV) and rhinovirus (RV). The data were analyzed and compared between the year of 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic) and 2019 (before COVID-19 pandemic). RESULTS: A total of 7107 patients were enrolled, including 4600 patients in 2019 and 2507 patients in 2020. Compared with 2019, we observed an unprecedented reduction of RSV, ADV, FluA, FluB, and MPV infections in 2020, despite of reopening of schools in June, 2020. However, the RV infection was significantly increased in 2020 and a sharp increase was observed especially after reopening of schools. Besides, the PIV infection showed resurgent characteristic after September of 2020. The mixed infections were significantly less frequent in 2020 compared with the year of 2019. CONCLUSIONS: The NPIs during the COVID-19 pandemic have great impact on the prevalence of common respiratory viruses in China. Meanwhile, we do need to be cautious of a possible resurgence of some respiratory viruses as the COVID-19 restrictions are relaxed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Age Distribution , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Male , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Seasons , Viruses/classification , Viruses/isolation & purification
9.
J Appl Lab Med ; 6(6): 1441-1451, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493844

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study outlines the development, implementation, and impact of a laboratory-developed, extraction-free real-time PCR assay as the primary diagnostic test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in a pediatric hospital. METHODS: Clinical specimens from both upper and lower respiratory tract sources were validated, including nasopharyngeal aspirates, nasopharyngeal swabs, anterior nares swabs, and tracheal aspirates (n = 333 clinical samples). Testing volumes and laboratory turnaround times were then compared before and after implementation to investigate effects of the workflow changes. RESULTS: Compared to magnetic-bead extraction platforms, extraction-free real-time PCR demonstrated ≥95% positive agreement and ≥97% negative agreement across all tested sources. Implementation of this workflow reduced laboratory turnaround time from an average of 8.8 (+/-5.5) h to 3.6 (+/-1.3) h despite increasing testing volumes (from 1515 to 4884 tests per week over the reported period of testing). CONCLUSIONS: The extraction-free workflow reduced extraction reagent cost for SARS-CoV-2 testing by 97%, shortened sample handling time, and significantly alleviated supply chain scarcities due to the elimination of specialized extraction reagents for routine testing. Overall, this assay is a viable option for laboratories to increase efficiency and navigate reagent shortages for SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic testing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Workflow
10.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258478, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468177

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of individual infection control measures and physical distancing on pediatric medical care in a local prefecture in Japan, where the incidence of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in pediatric patients was extremely low. We extracted data from hospital records on the number of outpatients, inpatients, infectious disease consultations, and consultations for representative pediatric diseases. We compared attendance in 2017-2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic, with 2020, when COVID-19 spread to Japan. There were no COVID-19 patients in the pediatric department during the study period. The total number outpatient visits decreased by 24.4%, and the number of hospital admissions, excluding neonatal care unit admissions, decreased by approximately 35%. There was a marked reduction in the number of hospitalizations for infectious diseases such as influenza (-74.8%) and respiratory syncytial virus infection (-93.5%), and the number of hospitalizations for bronchitis/pneumonia, Kawasaki disease, and bronchial asthma decreased. In contrast, the number of clinical psychological interventions and cases reported to the child guidance center increased. In the context of pandemic infectious diseases, it is important to control the spread of problematic infectious diseases by individual infection control measures and physical distancing. However, it is necessary to maintain social life as much as possible for the mental health and physical development of children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Tract Infections/therapy , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Male , Pandemics , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Sex Factors
11.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 19(2): 349-354, 2021 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449548

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic hit all age group with different presentations and outcome. This study aimed at exploring the clinical characteristics, investigational findings, hospital outcome along with 90 days follow up of COVID-19 infection in children. METHODS: This was longitudinal descriptive study among hospital admitted children with COVID-19 RT-PCR positive during first wave of Pandemic with 90 days telephonic follow up. Demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbidities, SPO2, investigations, need of oxygen , PICU admission, need of ventilator, outcome (improved and discharged, death) and duration of hospital stay were recorded and 90 days telephonic follow up was performed for any illness and hospital admission. RESULTS: Out of 65 children admitted, male 44 (67.7%) and female 21 (32.3%), median age was 23 months ( IQR 6 days -14 years) with 52( 80.0%) without any comorbid conditions. The common signs were Fever 40(61.5%) vomiting 15 (23.1%) and Cough 11(16.9%).Thirteen (20.0%) children has platelets count less than 150000 and 16(24.6%) had C - reactive protein Positive .Mean duration of hospital stay 8 days (Range 1 -44 days), 20( 30.8% ) needed oxygen , 20(30.8%) needed Pediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission and 6 (9.2%), needed ventilator. Forty seven (72.3%) recovered and discharged with death of 6.2% (n=4). Fifty six children (75.4%) has not experienced any problem after COVID -19 and only 2 children needed hospital admission in 90 days telephone follow up. CONCLUSIONS: In the first wave of the pandemic, Respiratory and Gastrointestinal symptoms were common presentation with few Severe and critical cases. Majority had good outcome. Majority has no other related illness till 90 days after discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Laboratories , Male , Nepal/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
JAAPA ; 34(10): 43-48, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440651

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: SARS-CoV-2 has profoundly affected the way healthcare is delivered and has created significant strain on medical facilities globally. As a result, hospitals have had to continuously adapt in order to provide optimal patient care while minimizing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, particularly in the surgical setting. Texas Children's Hospital developed a set of protocols for surgical screening and clearance of patients in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. These screening protocols were designed to mitigate the risk of exposing patients and healthcare providers to SARS-CoV-2 and have evolved significantly as a result of the emerging changes in medicine, technology, and governmental regulations. In this article, we share the reasoning behind the development, implementation, and successive modification of our institutional screening protocols.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Preoperative Care , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Child , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438527

ABSTRACT

Specific memory B cells and antibodies are a reliable read-out of vaccine efficacy. We analysed these biomarkers after one and two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine. The second dose significantly increases the level of highly specific memory B cells and antibodies. Two months after the second dose, specific antibody levels decline, but highly specific memory B cells continue to increase, thus predicting a sustained protection from COVID-19. We show that although mucosal IgA is not induced by the vaccination, memory B cells migrate in response to inflammation and secrete IgA at mucosal sites. We show that the first vaccine dose may lead to an insufficient number of highly specific memory B cells and low concentration of serum antibodies, thus leaving vaccinees without the immune robustness needed to ensure viral elimination and herd immunity. We also clarify that the reduction of serum antibodies does not diminish the force and duration of the immune protection induced by vaccination. The vaccine does not induce sterilizing immunity. Infection after vaccination may be caused by the lack of local preventive immunity because of the absence of mucosal IgA.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antigens, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cryopreservation , Female , Health Personnel , Healthy Volunteers , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lactation , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane/immunology , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
14.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 953, 2021 09 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413410

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated rapid changes in healthcare delivery in the United States, including changes in the care of hospitalized children. The objectives of this study were to identify major changes in healthcare delivery for hospitalized children during the COVID-19 pandemic, identify lessons learned from these changes, and compare and contrast the experiences of children's and community hospitals. METHODS: We purposefully sampled participants from both community and children's hospitals serving pediatric patients in the six U.S. states with the highest COVID-19 hospitalization rates at the onset of the pandemic. We recruited 2-3 participants from each hospital (mix of administrators, front-line physicians, nurses, and parents/caregivers) for semi-structured interviews. We analyzed interview data using constant comparative methods to identify major themes. RESULTS: We interviewed 30 participants from 12 hospitals. Participants described how leaders rapidly developed new hospital policies (e.g., directing use of personal protective equipment) and how this was facilitated by reviewing internal and external data frequently and engaging all relevant stakeholders. Hospital leaders optimized communication through regular, transparent, multi-modal, and bi-directional communication. Clinicians increased use of videoconference and telehealth to facilitate physical distancing, but these technologies may have disadvantaged non-English speakers. Due to declining volumes of hospitalized children and surges of adult patients, clinicians newly provided care for hospitalized adults. This was facilitated by developing care teams supported by adult hospitalists, multidisciplinary support via videoconference, and educational resources. Participants described how the pandemic negatively impacted clinicians' mental health, and they stressed the importance of mental health resources and wellness activities/spaces. CONCLUSIONS: We identified several major changes in inpatient pediatric care delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic, including the adoption of new hospital policies, video communication, staffing models, education strategies, and staff mental health supports. We outline important lessons learned, including strategies for successfully developing new policies, effectively communicating with staff, and supporting clinicians' expanding scope of practice. Potentially important focus areas in pandemic recovery include assessing and supporting clinicians' mental health and well-being, re-evaluating trainees' skills/competencies, and adapting educational strategies as needed. These findings can help guide hospital leaders in supporting pandemic recovery and addressing future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Child , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
15.
Med Educ Online ; 25(1): 1777066, 2020 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Residency programs invest a significant amount of time and resources on the recruitment process, and maintaining efficiency and cost-effectiveness are very important. Virtual Reality (VR) has become an adaptive substitute for 'real life' experiences and its use during the interview season could help save time and resources. OBJECTIVE: With the intention to maximize the interview day and provide a cost-effective alternative to facility tours, a Med-Peds residency training program introduced a VR tour of their children's hospital during recruitment. DESIGN: The Med-Peds program replaced an in-person facility tour of the children's hospital with a VR tour. Applicants were asked to complete an anonymous, voluntary survey on their VR experience at the end of the interview season, and rank features of the interview day in order of importance. RESULTS: There were 33 respondents out of 54 interviewees. Approximately two thirds (63-66%) agreed that VR was non-inferior and superior to in-person facility tours, and that the use of VR had a favorable impact on their perception of the program. However, almost 50% of the applicants had some difficulty using VR technology. CONCLUSION: Use of VR facility tours as an alternative to in-person tours of affiliate training facilities during a residency interview day is a viable and innovative option that can save time and money and favorably impact the applicant's impression of the program. More research is necessary to assess whether VR tours can replace in-person tours at the main teaching site, however, while social distancing measures are in place, VR tours may become necessary for programs moving forward. ABBREVIATIONS: Med-Peds: Internal Medicine-Pediatrics; VR: Virtual Reality; AAMC: Association of American Medical Colleges; IRB: Institutional Review Board.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/methods , Interviews as Topic/methods , Virtual Reality , Consumer Behavior , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Hospitals, Pediatric/economics , Humans , Internship and Residency/economics , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12999, 2021 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387481

ABSTRACT

An ever-increasing number of medical staff use mobile phones as a work aid, yet this may pose nosocomial diseases. To assess and report via a survey the handling practices and the use of phones by paediatric wards healthcare workers. 165 paediatric healthcare workers and staff filled in a questionnaire consisting of 14 questions (including categorical, ordinal and numerical data). Analysis of categorical data used non-parametric techniques such as the Chi-squared test. Although 98% of respondents (165 in total) report that their phones may be contaminated, 56% have never cleaned their devices. Of the respondents that clean their devices, 10% (17/165) had done so with alcohol swabs or disinfectant within that day or week; and an additional 12% respondents (20/165) within that month. Of concern, 52% (86/165) of the respondents use their phones in the bathroom, emphasising the unhygienic environments in which mobile phones/smartphones are constantly used. Disinfecting phones is a practice that only a minority of healthcare workers undertake appropriately. Mobile phones, present in billions globally, are therefore Trojan Horses if contaminated with microbes and potentially contributing to the spread and propagation of micro-organisms as per the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus in the world.


Subject(s)
Bathroom Equipment/virology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Phone/instrumentation , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disinfection/methods , Hospitals, Pediatric , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/virology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Male , Risk Factors , Self Report
17.
World J Pediatr ; 17(5): 484-494, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366410

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers are considered a particularly high-risk group during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Healthcare workers in paediatrics are a unique subgroup: they come into frequent contact with children, who often experience few or no symptoms when infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and, therefore, may transmit the disease to unprotected staff. In Germany, no studies exist evaluating the risk of COVID-19 to healthcare workers in paediatric institutions. METHODS: We tested the staff at a large children's hospital in Germany for immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies against the nucleocapsid protein of SARS-CoV-2 in a period between the first and second epidemic wave in Germany. We used a questionnaire to assess each individual's exposure risk and his/her own perception of having already been infected with SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: We recruited 619 participants from all sectors, clinical and non-clinical, constituting 70% of the entire staff. The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was 0.325% (95% confidence interval 0.039-1.168). Self-perceived risk of a previous SARS-CoV-2 infection decreased with age (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.93). Having experienced symptoms more than doubled the odds of a high self-perceived risk (odds ratio, 2.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-3.00). There was no significant difference in self-perceived risk between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Seroprevalence was low among healthcare workers at a large children's hospital in Germany before the second epidemic wave, and it was far from a level that confers herd immunity. Self-perceived risk of infection is often overestimated.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Assessment , Seroepidemiologic Studies
18.
Front Public Health ; 9: 644702, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354895

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCWs) play a central role in handling the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Monitoring HCWs, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, through screening programs, are critical to avoid the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the hospital environment to rapidly identify and isolate infected individuals and to allow their prompt return to work as soon as necessary. We aim to describe our healthcare surveillance experience (April 2-May 6, 2020) based on a combined screening consisting of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) on nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs and rapid serologic tests (RST) for SARS-CoV-2 in all HCWs of Meyer Children's University Hospital in Florence. Among the analyzed workers, 13/1690 (0.8%), all of them without clinical manifestations, was found positive for SARS-CoV-2 by using RT-PCR on NP swab: 8/1472 (0.5%) were found positive during the screening, 1/188 (0.5%) during contact with a positive individual (p > 0.05 vs. screening group), while 4/30 (13.3%) were found positive on the day of re-admission at work after an influenza-like-illness (p < 0.05). Concerning working areas, the majority of RT-PCR positivity (12/13) and serologic positivity (34/42) was found in non-COVID-19 dedicated areas (p > 0.05 vs. COVID-19 dedicated areas). No cases were registered among non-patients-facing workers (p = 0.04 vs. patient-facing group). Nurses and residents represented, respectively, the working role with the highest and lowest percentage of RT-PCR positivity. In conclusion, accurate surveillance is essential to reduce virus spread among HCWs, patients, and the community and to limit the shortage of skilled professionals. The implementation of the surveillance system through an efficient screening program was offered to all professionals, regardless of the presence of clinical manifestations and the level of working exposure risk, maybe wise and relevant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Tertiary Healthcare
19.
Hosp Pediatr ; 11(8): e164-e166, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354784
20.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 5(7): 473-482, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Paediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a new, rare, post-infectious complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children. We aimed to describe the 6-month outcomes of PIMS-TS. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study comprised children (aged <18 years) who fulfilled the UK Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) diagnostic criteria for PIMS-TS and were admitted to Great Ormond Street Hospital (London, UK) between April 4 and Sept 1, 2020. Patients were followed up by a multidisciplinary team of specialists at 6 weeks and 6 months after admission. Biochemical and functional outcomes were analysed. FINDINGS: 46 children were included in this study. The median age at presentation was 10·2 years (IQR 8·8-13·3), 30 (65%) patients were male and 16 (35%) were female, 37 (80%) were from minority ethnic groups, and eight (17%) had pre-existing comorbidities. All patients had elevated markers of systemic inflammation at baseline. None of the patients died. By 6 months, systemic inflammation was resolved in all but one patient. 38 (90%) of 42 patients who had positive SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies within 6 weeks of admission remained seropositive at 6 months. Echocardiograms were normal in 44 (96%) of 46 patients by 6 months, and gastrointestinal symptoms that were reported in 45 (98%) of 46 patients at onset were present in six (13%) of 46 patients at 6 months. Renal, haematological, and otolaryngological findings largely resolved by 6 months. Although minor abnormalities were identified on neurological examination in 24 (52%) of 46 patients at 6 weeks and in 18 (39%) of 46 at 6 months, we found minimal functional impairment at 6 months (median Expanded Disability Status Scale score 0 [IQR 0-1]). Median manual muscle test-8 scores improved from 53 (IQR 43-64) during hospital admission to 80 (IQR 68-80) at 6 months, but 18 (45%) of 40 patients showed 6-min walk test results below the third centile for their age or sex at 6 months. PedsQL responses revealed severe emotional difficulties at 6 months (seven [18%] of 38 by parental report and eight [22%] of 38 by self report). 45 (98%) of 46 patients were back in full-time education (virtually or face to face) by 6 months. INTERPRETATION: Despite initial severe illness, few organ-specific sequelae were observed at 6 months. Ongoing concerns requiring physical re-conditioning and mental health support remained, and physiotherapy assessments revealed persisting poor exercise tolerance. Longer-term follow-up will help define the extended natural history of PIMS-TS. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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