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1.
Med Educ Online ; 25(1): 1777066, 2020 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Residency programs invest a significant amount of time and resources on the recruitment process, and maintaining efficiency and cost-effectiveness are very important. Virtual Reality (VR) has become an adaptive substitute for 'real life' experiences and its use during the interview season could help save time and resources. OBJECTIVE: With the intention to maximize the interview day and provide a cost-effective alternative to facility tours, a Med-Peds residency training program introduced a VR tour of their children's hospital during recruitment. DESIGN: The Med-Peds program replaced an in-person facility tour of the children's hospital with a VR tour. Applicants were asked to complete an anonymous, voluntary survey on their VR experience at the end of the interview season, and rank features of the interview day in order of importance. RESULTS: There were 33 respondents out of 54 interviewees. Approximately two thirds (63-66%) agreed that VR was non-inferior and superior to in-person facility tours, and that the use of VR had a favorable impact on their perception of the program. However, almost 50% of the applicants had some difficulty using VR technology. CONCLUSION: Use of VR facility tours as an alternative to in-person tours of affiliate training facilities during a residency interview day is a viable and innovative option that can save time and money and favorably impact the applicant's impression of the program. More research is necessary to assess whether VR tours can replace in-person tours at the main teaching site, however, while social distancing measures are in place, VR tours may become necessary for programs moving forward. ABBREVIATIONS: Med-Peds: Internal Medicine-Pediatrics; VR: Virtual Reality; AAMC: Association of American Medical Colleges; IRB: Institutional Review Board.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/methods , Interviews as Topic/methods , Virtual Reality , Consumer Behavior , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Hospitals, Pediatric/economics , Humans , Internship and Residency/economics , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Emerg Med J ; 38(9): 692-693, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320446

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent research suggests that between 20% and 50% of paediatric head injuries attending our emergency department (ED) could be safely discharged soon after triage, without the need for medical review, using a 'Head Injury Discharge At Triage' tool (HIDAT). We sought to implement this into clinical practice. METHODS: Paediatric ED triage staff underwent competency-based assessments for HIDAT with all head injury presentations 1 May to 31 October 2020 included in analysis. We determined which patients were discharged using the tool, which underwent CT of the brain and whether there was a clinically important traumatic brain injury or representation to the ED. RESULTS: Of the 1429 patients screened; 610 (43%) screened negative with 250 (18%) discharged by nursing staff. Of the entire cohort, 32 CTs were performed for head injury concerns (6 abnormal) with 1 CT performed in the HIDAT negative group (normal). Of those discharged using HIDAT, four reattended, two with vomiting (no imaging or admission) and two with minor scalp wound infections. Two patients who screened negative declined discharge under the policy with later medical discharge (no imaging or admission). Paediatric ED attendances were 29% lower than in 2018. CONCLUSION: We have successfully implemented HIDAT into local clinical practice. The number discharged (18%) is lower than originally described; this is likely multifactorial. The relationship between COVID-19 and paediatric ED attendances is unclear but decreased attendances suggest those for whom the tool was originally designed are not attending ED and may be accessing other medical/non-medical resources.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , Head Injuries, Closed/diagnosis , Head Injuries, Penetrating/diagnosis , Triage/methods , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/etiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/standards , Head Injuries, Closed/complications , Head Injuries, Penetrating/complications , Health Plan Implementation , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Humans , Nurses, Pediatric/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Discharge , Professional Role , Triage/organization & administration , Triage/standards
4.
Phys Ther ; 101(9)2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281870

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this case report is to describe the challenges that COVID-19 presented for therapists in a pediatric hospital and the response to these challenges. METHODS: The case report setting is a physical therapy and occupational therapy department (department) of an academic pediatric medical center that provides a range of health care services for children and youth. Challenges that COVID-19 presented to the department included (1) managing safety concerns for patients, their families, and staff; (2) continuing to provide high-quality therapy services within state-mandated restrictions; (3) triaging patients; and (4) keeping clinicians employed and working productively. RESULTS: The department therapists responded to these challenges by (1) increasing communication huddles; (2) developing procedures for staffing and triaging of patients; (3) developing procedures for telehealth therapy services; and (4) designing a remote work program for all department employees. The number of patients and staff on site were reduced by initiating telehealth services, triaging patients, and developing a remote work plan. Communication huddles, department meetings, and supervision meetings were converted to virtual meetings. Staffing rates, patient-care productivity, and department project work were maintained. CONCLUSION: In response to COVID-19, the department developed new protocols and provided information about the protocols, which might be helpful for other pediatric hospitals or outpatient settings when planning for future pandemics or other issues that challenge the ability to provide usual care. Increasing the frequency of verbal and written communication on operational topics is recommended. Primary sources of information from national organizations (eg, the American Physical Therapy Association and the American Occupational Therapy Association) can assist with determining the scope of practice and code of conduct during a pandemic. IMPACT: COVID-19 posed challenges to operations and delivery of patient care. Although this case report is specific to COVID-19, principles applied and lessons learned from this experience can be applied to other emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Occupational Therapy Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Physical Therapy Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Rehabilitation/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Protocols , Humans , Massachusetts , Organizational Case Studies , Patient Selection , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
5.
S Afr Med J ; 111(4): 295-298, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215690

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic necessitated rapid changes in healthcare systems and at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCWMCH), Cape Town, South Africa. Paediatric services in particular required adjustment, not only for the paediatric patients but also for their carers and the staff looking after them. Strategies were divided into streams, including the impact of COVID-19 on the hospital and the role of RCWMCH in Western Cape Province, communication strategies, adaptation of clinical services at the hospital, specifically with a paediatric-friendly approach, and staff engagement. Interventions utilised: (i) Specific COVID-19 planning was required at a children's hospital, and lessons were learnt from other international children's hospitals. A similar number of patients and staff were infected by the virus (244 patients and 212 staff members by 21 December 2020). (ii) Measures were put in place to assist creation of capacity at metro hospitals' adult services by accepting children with emergency issues directly to RCWMCH, as well as accepting adolescents up to age 18 years. (iii) The communication strategy was improved to include daily engagement with heads of departments/supervisors by earlymorning structured information meetings. There were also changes in the methods of communication with staff using media such as Zoom, MS Teams and WhatsApp. Hospital-wide information and discussion sessions were held both on social platforms and in the form of smallgroup physical meetings with senior hospital administrators (with appropriate distancing). Labour union representatives were purposefully directly engaged to assess concerns. (iv) Clinical services at the hospital were adapted. These included paediatric-friendly services and physical changes to the hospital environment. (v) Staff engagement was particularly important to assist in allaying staff anxiety, developing a staff screening programme, and provision and training in use of personal protective equipment, as well as focusing on staff wellness. In conclusion, visible management and leadership has allowed for flexibility and adaptability to manage clinical services in various contexts. It is important to utilise staff in different roles during a crisis and to consider the different perspectives of people involved in the services. The key to success, that included very early adoption of the above measures, has been hospital staff taking initiative, searching for answers and identifying and implementing solutions, effective communication, and leadership support. These lessons are useful in dealing with second and further waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , South Africa/epidemiology , Tertiary Healthcare/organization & administration
6.
J Ambul Care Manage ; 44(3): 184-196, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165539

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic produced an abrupt and near shutdown of nonemergent patient care. Children's National Hospital (CNH) mounted a multidisciplinary, coordinated ambulatory response that included supply chain management, human resources, risk management, infection control, and information technology. To ensure patient access, CNH expanded telemedicine and instituted operational innovations for outpatient procedures. While monthly in-person ambulatory subspecialty visits decreased from 25 889 pre-COVID-19 to 4484 at nadir of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine visits increased from 70 to 13 539. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of innovations in health care delivery and operations that the crisis prompted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Planning , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine
7.
Bol Med Hosp Infant Mex ; 78(1): 3-9, 2020 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138997

ABSTRACT

Overview of the pandemic In December 2019, a new virus named SARS-CoV-2 was reported in Wuhan province, China. The first case of COVID-19 in Mexico was confirmed on February 28, 2020, and the World Health Organization declared the pandemic on March 11.


Subject(s)
Bed Occupancy/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Pandemics , Algorithms , Health Personnel , Humans , Mexico , Needs Assessment , Triage , Workforce
8.
Pediatr Surg Int ; 37(7): 871-880, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130763

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: With the emergence of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, institutions were tasked with developing individualized pre-procedural testing strategies that allowed for re-initiation of elective procedures within national and state guidelines. This report describes the experience of a single US children's hospital (Children's Wisconsin, CW) in developing a universal pre-procedural COVID-19 testing protocol and reports early outcomes. METHODS: The CW pre-procedural COVID-19 response began with the creation of a multi-disciplinary taskforce that sought to develop a strategy for universal pre-procedural COVID-19 testing which (1) maximized patient safety, (2) prevented in-hospital viral transmission, (3) conserved resources, and (4) allowed for resumption of procedural care within institutional capacity. RESULTS: Of 11,209 general anesthetics performed at CW from March 16, 2020 to October 31, 2020, 11,150 patients (99.5%) underwent pre-procedural COVID-19 testing. Overall, 1.4% of pre-procedural patients tested positive for COVID-19. By June 2020, CW was operating at near-normal procedural volume and there were no documented cases of in-hospital viral transmission. Only 0.5% of procedures were performed under augmented COVID-19 precautions (negative pressure environment and highest-level personal protective equipment). CONCLUSION: CW successfully developed a multi-disciplinary pre-procedural COVID-19 testing protocol that enabled resumption of near-normal procedural volume within three months while limiting in-hospital viral transmission and resource use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , COVID-19/transmission , Child , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Healthcare/organization & administration , Wisconsin/epidemiology
9.
Bol Med Hosp Infant Mex ; 78(2): 102-109, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115630

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the experience in a public pediatric hospital when implementing the Mexican Health Ministry's recommendations on the inclusion and importance of a chosen caregiver during the hospitalization of a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pediatric patient. The implementation includes the adjustments, observations, and limitations made in real practice and process. In conclusion, the value and benefits of the accompaniment of hospitalized children with COVID-19 by a primary or chosen caregiver are evidenced and supported by family-centered care. Furthermore, the recommendations mentioned result in comprehensive bio-psycho-social care for the benefit of pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Caregivers/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Child , Hospitalization , Humans , Mexico , Patient-Centered Care/methods
11.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 65(6): 755-760, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096648

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial wave of the Covid-19 pandemic has hit Italy, and Lombardy in particular, with violence, forcing to reshape all hospitals' activities; this happened even in pediatric hospitals, although the young population seemed initially spared from the disease. "Vittore Buzzi" Children's Hospital, which is a pediatric/maternal hospital located in Milan (Lombardy Region), had to stop elective procedures-with the exception of urgent/emergent ones-between February and May 2020 to leave space and resources to adults' care. We describe the challenges of reshaping the hospital's identity and structure, and restarting pediatric surgery and anesthesia, from May on, in the most hit area of the world, with the purpose to avoid and contain infections. Both patients and caregivers admitted to hospital have been tested for Sars-CoV-2 in every case. METHODS: Observational cohort study via review of clinical charts of patients undergoing surgery between 16th May and 30th September 2020, together with SARS-CoV -2 RT-PCR testing outcomes, and comparison to same period surgeries in 2019. RESULTS: An increase of approximately 70% in pediatric surgeries (OR 1.68 [1.33-2.13], P < .001) and a higher increase in the number of surgeries were reported (OR 1.75 (1.43-2.15), P < .001). Considering only urgent procedures, a significant difference in the distribution of the type of surgery was observed (Chi-squared P-value < .001). Sars-CoV-2-positive patients have been 0.8% of total number; 14% of these was discovered through caregiver's positivity. CONCLUSION: We describe our pathway for safe pediatric surgery and anesthesia and the importance of testing both patient and caregiver.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Caregivers , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Diagnosis-Related Groups , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergencies/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Patients , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Symptom Assessment , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
12.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 9(6): 772-776, 2020 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072399

ABSTRACT

We describe the adaptive coping strategies required in the management of a heterogeneous group of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pediatric patients. The diverse range of presentations, presenting in distinct phenotypic waves, exemplified the importance of preparedness for the unknown. Lessons learned will be essential in planning for a likely second wave of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitals, Pediatric , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Humans , Male , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , United Kingdom/epidemiology
16.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 19, 2021 Jan 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054827

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has markedly affected emergency care, due to sudden limitation of health care capacity by general practitioners (GP) and urgent need for infection control strategies. We evaluated the activity of the Emergency Department (ED) during the national lockdown (March 8-April 30), as well as the outcomes of our infection control strategy. RESULTS: Despite a reduction in access by one fifth, a proportion of febrile patients comparable to 2019 was seen (829/2492, 33.3% vs 4580/13.342, 34.3%, p = 0.3). Diagnostic swab for COVID-19 was performed in 25% of patients, especially in subjects with co-morbidities or multiple access. Six infected cases were identified, all presenting with febrile disease. Only two positive patients fulfilled the criteria for diagnostic swab provided by the Italian Health Authorities, because of close contact with suspected or confirmed cases. The rate of admission for febrile or respiratory conditions was higher than the same period of 2019 (33.4% vs 25.9%, p < 0.0001). None of the 105 health-care professionals working during the study time lapse exhibited anti-SARS-CoV-2 seroconversion. Among the 589 patients with information available, 54.9% declared no medical consultation at all prior to coming to ED, while only 40 (of which 27 with fever) had been examined by their GP before coming to ED. Nevertheless, 35.6% of the cases were already taking medications. None of the 9 patients requiring intensive care reported recent pediatric consultation, despite symptoms duration up to 30 days. CONCLUSION: Our results provide evidence that the reduced capacity of primary care facilities during the national lockdown may have caused a high rate of self-medication as well as a delayed provision of care in some patients. Identification of pediatric patients affected with SARS-CoV-2 infection remains a challenge because of the absence of reliable predictive factors. Finally, the use of specific triage centers, with dedicated pathways to diagnose SARS-CoV-2 infection, trace contacts and allow adequate care after swabs, is effective in preventing spreading of the infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Triage
19.
Hosp Top ; 99(1): 44-47, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998084

ABSTRACT

Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) is a growing subspecialty with a broad scope. The Covid-19 pandemic demands flexible staffing models. Advanced practice providers (APPs) can be a valuable addition to hospital medicine teams, although there is no established training program for APPs within PHM. The authors' purpose is to describe how one institution rapidly established a PHM APP team by collaborating with experienced APPs working in other areas of the hospital. This APP team cared for 16% of the average daily census during the pilot period with no significant difference in length of stay compared to traditional teams.


Subject(s)
Advanced Practice Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/trends , Advanced Practice Nursing/trends , COVID-19/nursing , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Care Team , Pilot Projects , Surge Capacity/standards , Surge Capacity/statistics & numerical data
20.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 31(1): 53-60, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-952586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All anesthetists are at risk of mental ill health and pediatric anesthetists face additional stressors that may impact upon well-being, particularly after an adverse outcome. The SARS COV-2 pandemic has resulted in a plethora of resources to support the well-being of frontline workers. Developing a well-being system for an anesthesia department using these resources may be complex to implement. AIMS: In this article we outline how an anesthesia department can design and implement a framework for wellbeing, regardless of resources and financial constraints. We use the example of a free online toolkit developed in Australia for anesthetists. METHODS: The "Long lives, Healthy Workplaces toolkit" is a framework which has been specifically developed by mental health experts for anesthetists, and does not require departments to pay for external experts.1 Departments can design a long-term model of evidence-based mental health strategies to meet their unique needs using five steps outlined in the toolkit and detailed in this article. The framework uses cycles of assessment and review to create an adaptable approach to incorporate emerging evidence. We explain how culture can impact the implementation of a well-being framework and we outline how departments can set goals and priorities. CONCLUSION: Departments have different constraints which will alter how they approach supporting anaesthetists' wellbeing. Regardless of location or funding all departments should explicitly address anesthetists well-being. Long term sustainable well-being programs require a strategic and coordinated approach.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Anesthetists/organization & administration , Anesthetists/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics
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