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1.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 38(4): 653-659, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780361

ABSTRACT

The objective of this article is to present the experiences of telehealth in a hospital specialized in mental health in Lima, Peru during 2020. In accordance with the provisions such as the temporary closure of face-to-face care and mandatory confinement between the months of March As of December, care was progressively provided through telephone calls, video calls or digital platforms, with 57,398 teleconsultations and telemonitoring, 4411 mental health orientations, 295 teleinterconsultations in psychiatry, 42 teletraining activities and 29 educational sessions in mental health aimed at the general population. We conclude that the implementation of telehealth for the care of the users of the Hermilio Valdizán Hospital contributed to mental health care and reduces the gaps in access to specialized care in psychiatry due to the consequences of COVID-19.


El objetivo de este artículo es dar a conocer las experiencias de telesalud en un hospital especializado en salud mental en Lima, Perú durante la pandemia de COVID-19. En concordancia con las disposiciones, como el cierre temporal de la atención presencial y el confinamiento obligatorio entre los meses de marzo a diciembre del 2020, se brindó progresivamente atención a través de llamadas telefónicas, videollamadas o plataformas digitales; se realizaron 57398 atenciones de teleconsultas y telemonitoreos; 4411 orientaciones en salud mental; 295 teleinterconsultas en psiquiatría; 42 actividades de telecapacitación y 29 sesiones educativas en salud mental dirigidas a la población general. Concluimos que la implementación de la telesalud para la atención de los usuarios del Hospital Hermilio Valdizán contribuyó al cuidado de la salud mental y permite reducir las brechas de acceso a la atención especializada en psiquiatría por las consecuencias de la COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Circ J ; 86(3): 458-463, 2022 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714688

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) among hospitalized psychiatric patients after coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection remains unclear.Methods and Results:We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of proximal DVT after COVID-19 infection among 50 hospitalized patients in a Japanese psychiatric hospital that in which a COVID-19 cluster developed between August and September 2020. The prevalence of proximal DVT was 10.0%. Patients with proximal DVT had a lower body weight and higher maximum D-dimer levels and International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous Thromboembolism (IMPROVE) VTE scores. CONCLUSIONS: After COVID-19 infection, hospitalized psychiatric patients are at high risk of DVT and should be carefully followed up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thrombosis/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy , Venous Thrombosis/etiology
3.
Gac Med Mex ; 157(4): 443-447, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704408

ABSTRACT

In the context of the emerging COVID-19 pandemic, one of the great challenges is to generate effective strategies for the control of nosocomial infections, specifically in psychiatric hospitals with populations considered at risk (older adults or individuals with comorbidities). This article describes the strategies for prevention, containment and treatment of infection transmission implemented during a COVID-19 outbreak that occurred in July 2020 in a psychiatric hospital of the State of Mexico. The population was comprised by women with prolonged hospital stay (mean = 24 years), mostly geriatric (mean = 64 years), with various psychiatric disorders and comorbidities. In total, 19 COVID-19-positive cases were diagnosed, out of which thirteen had mild symptoms and six were asymptomatic. There were no alterations in mental state, psychiatric symptoms or underlying diseases. Algorithms were developed for the management and treatment of suspected/confirmed COVID-19 cases. Finally, the generation of comprehensive strategies, quick and timely actions, as well as adequate management of human resources favoring interdisciplinary work, were deemed to have contributed to contain and mitigate the COVID-19 outbreak, which constitutes a precedent in the psychiatric field with institutionalized patients.


En el contexto de la emergente pandemia de COVID-19, uno de los grandes desafíos es generar estrategias eficaces de control de infecciones nosocomiales, específicamente en hospitales psiquiátricos con población considerada de riesgo (adultos mayores o con comorbilidades). En el presente artículo se describen las estrategias de prevención, contención y tratamiento de contagio, a partir de un brote de COVID-19 ocurrido en julio de 2020 en un hospital psiquiátrico del Estado de México. La población estuvo constituida por mujeres con estancia hospitalaria prolongada (media = 24 años), en su mayoría geriátricas (media = 64 años), con trastornos psiquiátricos diversos y comorbilidades. En total se diagnosticaron 19 casos positivos de COVID-19, de los cuales 13 cursaron con sintomatología leve y seis resultaron asintomáticos. No se presentaron alteraciones en el estado mental, en la sintomatología psiquiátrica ni en las enfermedades de base. Se realizaron algoritmos para el manejo y tratamiento de los casos sospechosos o confirmados de COVID-19. Finalmente, se consideró que la generación de estrategias integrales, acciones rápidas y oportunas, así como una adecuada gestión de recursos humanos favorecedora del trabajo interdisciplinario contribuyeron a contener y mitigar el brote de COVID-19, constituyéndose en un precedente en el ámbito psiquiátrico con pacientes institucionalizadas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Aged , Female , Humans , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 53(2): 70-76, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662730

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to implement an educational intervention on an inpatient, behavioral health care unit with the goal of reducing the number of crisis interventions of seclusion or restraint. METHOD: A quasi-experimental pretest and posttest design using De-escalate Anyone, Anywhere, Anytime training was employed with a focus of an increased understanding of a range of de-escalation techniques to use instead of restraint and seclusion. RESULTS: A convenience sample of 21 mental health employees participated in the training. The rates of restraint declined from a mean of 6 preintervention to 2 postintervention. The number of seclusions on the designated unit declined from a mean of 4.33 preintervention to a mean of 1.667 postintervention. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that an educational intervention to increase the knowledge of direct care staff in a broad range of de-escalation techniques resulted in a reduction in the use of restraint and seclusion. Ongoing training for nursing staff may reassure them of the efficacy of alternative methods for dealing with aggressive patients. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2022;53(2):70-76.].


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Patient Isolation , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Inpatients , Mental Disorders/therapy , Restraint, Physical
5.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 69: 103004, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637202

ABSTRACT

Catatonia has been reported as one among many neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with COVID-19 infection. Catatonia and COVID-19 co-occurrence remain clinical concerns, often posing challenges pertaining to diagnosis, and especially management. Limited information is available regarding the appropriate approaches to the management of catatonia in COVID-19 infection, particularly with reference to the safety and efficacy of benzodiazepines and Electro-convulsive therapy (ECT). We present our experience of five patients with catatonia consequent to heterogeneous underlying causes and concurrent COVID-19 infection, who received care at the psychiatric COVID unit of our tertiary care psychiatric hospital. An interesting observation included varying underlying causes for catatonia and the potential role that COVID-19 infection may have played in the manifestation of catatonia. In our experience, new-onset catatonia with or without pre-existing psychiatric illness and concurrent COVID-19 can be safely and effectively managed with lorazepam and/or ECTs. However, critical to the same is the need to implement modified protocols that integrate pre-emptive evaluation for COVID-19 disease and proactive monitoring of its relevant clinical parameters, thereby permitting judicious and timely implementation of catatonia-specific treatment options.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Catatonia , Electroconvulsive Therapy , Catatonia/diagnosis , Catatonia/etiology , Catatonia/therapy , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Healthcare
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 40: 39, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502776

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spreads, sleep problems are expected to increase among healthcare workers. Therefore, we aimed to assess the knowledge of COVID-19, sleep problem and identify sociodemographic factors associated with sleep problems among healthcare workers in a Nigerian neuropsychiatric hospital. METHODS: a cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 healthcare workers in a neuropsychiatric hospital using self-administered questionnaires to assess knowledge of COVID-19, sleep problem, social support, and sociodemographic factors that affect sleep. Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation were applied to assess the association between sociodemographic factors and sleep problems. RESULTS: about 23.9% of the healthcare workers reported having a sleep problem. However, there was no association of sleep problems with any sociodemographic factors except age (r=0.26) and social support (r=-0.18). CONCLUSION: the study offered insight into the occurrence of sleep problems among healthcare workers and suggested a guide for planning interventions targeted at improving the psychological well-being of healthcare workers in the face of current global pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Male , Nigeria , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21002, 2021 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483148

ABSTRACT

COVID19 infection was associated with possible psychiatric manifestations, including psychosis and mania. In addition, psychiatric disorders might be triggered by severe psychological reactions to the pandemic or the measures taken to contain it. This study aimed to assess the trends of new-onset psychosis/mania during the pandemic timeline. Psychiatric emergency department records during January-July 2019 and 2020 of two regional mental health centers were manually examined. Cases of new-onset psychosis or mania were found in 326 out of 5161 records examined. The ratio of these cases increased by 45.5% in 2020 compared to 2019 (189 out of 2367, 137 out of 2479, respectively, p = 0.001). The peak increase was in April 2020 (9.4% vs. 4.7%, p = 0.015). There was no association between the rise of new-onset psychotic or manic episodes and national incidence of COVID19 cases, as observed during Israel 2nd wave. PCR tests were negative, except a single case. In this study, an increase in new-onset psychosis/mania was identified during the initial phase of the pandemic. Though causality could not be directly inferred, lack of infection symptoms, negative PCR testing and temporal distribution incongruent with COVID19 caseload did not support a direct effect of SARS-CoV-2. Alternative explanations are discussed, such as psychological reaction to stress and preventive measures, as well as case-shifting between different mental health settings.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Psychiatric/statistics & numerical data , Psychotic Disorders/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bipolar Disorder/psychology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Electronic Health Records , Emergency Service, Hospital/trends , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric/trends , Humans , Israel/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Psychotic Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Young Adult
9.
Am J Public Health ; 111(10): 1780-1783, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416983

ABSTRACT

Individuals with serious mental illness are particularly vulnerable to COVID-19. The New York State (NYS) Office of Mental Health implemented patient and staff rapid testing, quarantining, and vaccination to limit COVID-19 spread in 23 state-operated psychiatric hospitals between November 2020 and February 2021. COVID-19 infection rates in inpatients and staff decreased by 96% and 71%, respectively, and the NYS population case rate decreased by 6%. Repeated COVID-19 testing and vaccination should be priority interventions for state-operated psychiatric hospitals. (Am J Public Health. 2021;111(10):1780-1783. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306444).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Psychiatric/statistics & numerical data , Mass Vaccination/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , New York/epidemiology , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Vulnerable Populations
10.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(5)2021 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403942

ABSTRACT

Objective: The mental health community expected that seriously mentally ill (SMI) patients would be especially vulnerable to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection due to a higher medical comorbidity rate than the general population and disparities in access to medical care. Concern was voiced as to the impact on the psychiatric stability of this population due to anxiety about the pandemic, recommended isolation, and limited in-person interactions with treatment providers and support systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on a cohort of involuntarily hospitalized SMI patients.Methods: The electronic medical records from March 28 through December 31, 2020 of all COVID-positive psychiatric inpatients were retrospectively reviewed. No outpatients or readmissions were included in the sample.Results: During the study period 238, COVID-positive inpatients were identified out of approximately 12,859 discreet admissions. The sample consisted of 158 men (66%) and 80 women (34%). The mean age of positive patients was 41 years. Eight patients (3%) required medical hospitalizations related to COVID-19, with 1 death. Ninety-seven patients (41%) had at least 1 or more of the known medical comorbidities related to increased risk for COVID-19 infection. Seclusion, restraints, and administration of as-needed medications (PRN) for anxiety or psychotic agitation occurred less frequently in the COVID-positive patients compared to those without infection.Conclusions: Medical hospitalizations were infrequent in the study sample. Medical comorbidities were much higher in this group relative to statewide data. Seclusion, restraint, and PRN administration were lower in the COVID-positive cohort compared to COVID-negative inpatients. Overall, the sample group did not experience significant negative outcomes as might have been expected for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Inpatients , Adult , Demography , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Psychiatr Pol ; 55(3): 585-598, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English, Polish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395317

ABSTRACT

Within the scope of mental health protection, numerous practical problems arise concerning the issue of providing health services to a minor. Admission of a minor to a psychiatric hospital is associated in practice with numerous doubts. This part of the article describes the conditions of admission to hospital with the consent of the patient. It distinguishes and accurately describes situations where a minor is under or over 16 years of age. In addition, it explains situations where there is a contradiction of declarations of will by legal guardians in relation to admission, their inability to perform legal acts, or a contradiction of the statements of the minor and guardian. It also addresses the aspect of receiving written consent during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
Commitment of Mentally Ill/legislation & jurisprudence , Informed Consent/legislation & jurisprudence , Legal Guardians/legislation & jurisprudence , Minors/legislation & jurisprudence , Patient Admission/legislation & jurisprudence , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Psychiatric/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Poland
12.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 60(11): 1332-1334, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385763

ABSTRACT

Increasing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination rates has been identified by the US Centers of Disease Control and Prevention as critical to ending the COVID-19 pandemic.1 On May 10, 2021, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine (BNT162b2; Pfizer, Inc, New York, New York, and BioNTech SE, Mainz, Germany) was approved for emergency use authorization by the US Food and Drug Administration for patients 12 years of age or older. Here we report a retrospective study describing the implementation of a COVID-19 vaccination program at our child and adolescent psychiatric hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first report detailing the administration of the COVID-19 vaccination in this setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
14.
J Psychiatr Res ; 143: 16-20, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364281

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As patients with severe mental illness are at increased risk for COVID-19 mortality, the issue of willingness to be vaccinated is of extreme importance. METHODS: During February 2021 Shalvata Mental Health hospital provided Covid-19 vaccines to its patients. Fifty one patients suffering from severe mental illness, out of 196 patients hospitalized in closed, open or day wards during that period, signed the informed consent and were assessed for their clinical condition (OQ-45), fear of Covid-19 (FCV-19S) and approach to the vaccine (C19-VHS). All patients who were not vaccinated in February 2021 (baseline) were re-approached a month later to assess whether they had gotten vaccinated since. RESULTS: Patients who were not vaccinated at baseline had an oppositional approach to the vaccine, and did not significantly differ in their fear of Covid-19 levels or in levels of clinical severity (t(49) = 2.51, p = 0.02) from those who were vaccinated. From the 29 patients who were not vaccinated at baseline approach to the vaccine was a good predictor to getting vaccinated after one month (79% positive predictive value). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of patients suffering from a severe mental illness are willing to get vaccinated, and their decision of whether or not to get vaccinated is based on their viewpoint on the vaccine rather than being an outcome of their level of distress (OQ-45). It is important to allow vaccine accessibility to hospitalized patients, to consider their opinions and to provide useful information to lower vaccine hesitancy and improve vaccination rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(15)2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335062

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: While in many countries, the psychiatric and mental health sectors had been in crisis for years, the onset of a novel coronavirus pandemic impacted their structures, organizations, and professionals worldwide. (2) Methods: To document the early impacts of the COVID-19 health crisis on psychiatry and mental health sectors, a systematic review of the international literature published in 2020 was conducted in PubMed (MEDLINE), Cairn.info, and SantéPsy (Ascodocpsy) databases. (3) Results: After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 72 articles from scientific journals were selected, including papers documenting the early impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the organization of psychiatric care delivery, work processes in psychiatry and mental health units, and personal experiences of mental health professionals. This review identified the contributions aimed at preventing the onset of mental disorders in the early stages of the health crisis. It lists the organizational changes that have been implemented in the first place to ensure continuity of psychiatric care while reducing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission. It questions the evolution of the rights and duties of mental health professionals in the first months of the pandemic. (4) Discussion and conclusions: Although this literature review exclusively documented the early impacts of the COVID-19 health crisis, it is of significant interest, as it pictures the unprecedent situation in which psychiatry and mental health care professionals found themselves in the first stages of the pandemic. This work is a preliminary step of a study to be conducted with mental health professionals on an international scale-the Psy-GIPO2C project-based on more than 15 group interviews, 30 individual interviews, and 2000 questionnaires. The final aim of this study is to formulate concrete recommendations for decision-makers to improve work in psychiatry and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(4)2021 07 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302621

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the impact of masks and plastic partitions on patient-doctor communication and subjective anxiety for infection in patients with psychiatric disorders.Methods: Subjects were patients who visited a psychiatric clinic in Japan from April 27 to August 31, 2020. Anxiety of being infected and the psychological barrier to communication were evaluated on a 5-point scale.Results: The final analysis included 425 patients. Most participants answered that there was no change with regard to communication when the doctor was wearing a mask (n = 353, 91.0%) or using a plastic partition (n = 318, 82.8%). Most participants responded that anxiety for being infected was very mild, a little mild, or not changed by the doctor wearing a mask and using a plastic partition. Most participants felt significantly less anxiety with the doctor wearing a mask/using a plastic partition before than after the state of emergency declaration (P = .005 for mask and P < .001 for plastic partition). Participants in the older age range felt significantly higher anxiety compared to those in the younger and middle age range groups from doctors wearing masks (P < .001) and compared to those in the middle age range group from plastic partitions (P = .001).Conclusions: Use of masks and plastic partitions in psychiatric practice is recommended, as it may result in reduction of anxiety for infection without affecting patient-doctor communication in patients with psychiatric disorders. The generalizability of the results of the present study should be tested.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Masks , Mentally Ill Persons/psychology , Physician-Patient Relations , Protective Devices , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Young Adult
18.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry ; 60(10): 1171-1175, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293872

ABSTRACT

The impact of COVID-19 changed the use and delivery of health care services, requiring an abrupt shift in treatment and staffing models 1,2. This is particularly salient in youth acute and intensive treatment services (AITS), including inpatient psychiatric hospitals (IPH), intensive outpatient programs (IOP), and partial hospitalization programs (PHP), because of challenging issues of maintaining high-quality care and a safe therapeutic milieu during increased demand for acute services,3 all while limiting transmission of COVID-19 on locked units, in close quarters, and for youths traveling back and forth to day-programs. Over the past year, AITS adapted and evolved without the ability to pause services and plan, increase staffing, or allocate additional resources. This article discusses themes of changes made based on more than 20 facilities across the United States through the American Psychological Association Child and Adolescent Psychology Division's Acute, Intensive, and Residential Service Special Interest Group.4 These facilities include psychiatric inpatient units and day-treatment programs. We discuss lessons learned from these changes, the need for evaluating these changes, and application of these lessons in future crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Child , Day Care, Medical , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
19.
J Psychiatr Pract ; 27(2): 137-144, 2021 Mar 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292182

ABSTRACT

The widespread prevalence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) means that inpatient psychiatric units will necessarily manage patients who have COVID-19 that is comorbid with acute psychiatric symptoms. We report a case of recurrence of respiratory symptoms and positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing in a patient on an inpatient psychiatric unit occurring 42 days after the initial positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR test, 38 days after initial symptom resolution, and 30 days after the first of 3 negative SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR tests. Over the course of the admission, the patient was safely initiated on clozapine. Recent literature on COVID-19's potential recurrence and neuropsychiatric effects is reviewed and implications for the management of COVID-19 on inpatient psychiatric units are discussed. In the era of COVID-19 and our still-developing understanding of this illness, psychiatrists' role as advocates and collaborators in our patients' physical health care has become even more critical.


Subject(s)
Antidepressive Agents/therapeutic use , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Depressive Disorder, Major/complications , Depressive Disorder, Major/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Adult , Alcoholism/complications , Alcoholism/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Clozapine , Depressive Disorder, Major/diagnosis , Hospitals, Psychiatric , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Male , Mirtazapine/therapeutic use , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Sertraline/therapeutic use , Suicide, Attempted
20.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 34(2): 16-20, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291998

ABSTRACT

In their paper, Stelnicki and Carleton (2021) highlight both the findings of their 2019 survey of nurses' mental health (Stelnicki et al. 2020) and more recent literature published during the COVID-19 pandemic. This response outlines the role of nursing leaders in enabling the mental health of nurses in a mental health and addiction setting, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Psychiatric Nursing/organization & administration , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Leadership , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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