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1.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 993, 2023 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic increases the risk of psychological problems, especially for the infected population. Sleep disturbance and feelings of defeat and entrapment are well-documented risk factors of anxiety symptoms. Exploring the psychological mechanism of the development of anxiety symptoms is essential for effective prevention. This study aimed to examine the mediating effects of entrapment and defeat in the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms among asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers in Shanghai, China. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April, 2022. Participants were 1,283 asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers enrolled from the Ruijin Jiahe Fangcang Shelter Hospital, Shanghai (59.6% male; mean age = 39.6 years). Questionnaire measures of sleep disturbance, entrapment, defeat, anxiety symptoms, and background characteristics were obtained. A mediation model was constructed to test the mediating effects of entrapment and defeat in the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms were 34.3% and 18.8%. Sleep disturbance was positively associated with anxiety symptoms (OR [95%CI] = 5.013 [3.721-6.753]). The relationship between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms (total effect: Std. Estimate = 0.509) was partially mediated by entrapment (indirect effect: Std. Estimate = 0.129) and defeat (indirect effect: Std. Estimate = 0.126). The mediating effect of entrapment and defeat accounted for 50.3% of the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: Sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms were prevalent among asymptomatic COVID-19 carriers. Entrapment and defeat mediate the association between sleep disturbance and anxiety symptoms. More attention is needed to monitoring sleep conditions and feelings of defeat and entrapment to reduce the risk of anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Humans , Male , Adult , Female , Depression/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , Anxiety/epidemiology , Sleep , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(10)2023 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238612

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, Fangcang shelter hospitals have been built and operated in several cities, and have played a huge role in epidemic prevention and control. How to use medical resources effectively in order to maximize epidemic prevention and control is a big challenge that the government should address. In this paper, a two-stage infectious disease model was developed to analyze the role of Fangcang shelter hospitals in epidemic prevention and control, and examine the impact of medical resources allocation on epidemic prevention and control. Our model suggested that the Fangcang shelter hospital could effectively control the rapid spread of the epidemic, and for a very large city with a population of about 10 million and a relative shortage of medical resources, the model predicted that the final number of confirmed cases could be only 3.4% of the total population in the best case scenario. The paper further discusses the optimal solutions regarding medical resource allocation when medical resources are either limited or abundant. The results show that the optimal allocation ratio of resources between designated hospitals and Fangcang shelter hospitals varies with the amount of additional resources. When resources are relatively sufficient, the upper limit of the proportion of makeshift hospitals is about 91%, while the lower limit decreases with the increase in resources. Meanwhile, there is a negative correlation between the intensity of medical work and the proportion of distribution. Our work deepens our understanding of the role of Fangcang shelter hospitals in the pandemic and provides a reference for feasible strategies by which to contain the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Hospitals, Special , Mobile Health Units , China/epidemiology
3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1129322, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276101

ABSTRACT

Introduction: With the COVID-19 pandemic in China, a large number of mild or ordinary confirmed cases have been sent to Fangcang shelter hospitals for treatment. We aimed to investigate the mental health condition of Fangcang patients 2 years after the pandemic when patients knew more about COVID-19 and the virus was less virulent. We focused on the effect of dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep on depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Methods: A total of 1,014 patients from two large Fangcang shelter hospitals in Shanghai between 22 April and 8 May 2022 completed a set of questionnaires comprising: the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the Insomnia Severity Index scale. Results: Results show that the positive screening rates for anxiety, depression, and insomnia among tested patients were 55.3, 27.0, and 47.8%, respectively. Patients were more likely to report higher anxiety, depression, and insomnia, and to endorse affective and sleep disorders if they were: female, aged 18-40 years, with undergraduate course or above, white-collar employees, or those who thought the pandemic would have severe economic effects. About 51.4% of the participants had dysfunctional beliefs about sleep to varying degrees. Compared with patients who had accurate beliefs about sleep, the ratios of insomnia, anxiety, and depression were significantly higher among patients with dysfunctional beliefs about sleep. Discussion: Attention should be paid to the mental health problems of patients in Fangcang shelter hospitals. The results indicate that dysfunctional beliefs about sleep significantly increased anxiety, depression, and insomnia of Fangcang patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , Female , Mental Health , Sleep Quality , Pandemics , Hospitals, Special , Depression/psychology , Mobile Health Units , China , Sleep
4.
BMJ Open ; 13(4): e066930, 2023 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261406

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aims to assess the volunteer motivation and stress load of patient volunteers in the Fangcang shelter hospitals (FSHs), examine their associations, and explore the potential influence factors of volunteer motivation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional online survey conducted from 21 April to 20 May 2022. SETTING: Questionnaires were collected from patient volunteers selected by random cluster sampling in the FSHs in Shanghai, China. PARTICIPANTS: 197 participants who met the inclusion criteria as patients who were asymptomatic or presenting with mild symptoms in the FSHs and who volunteered to assist with routine work under quarantined settings. OUTCOME MEASURES: We investigated sociodemographic information, stress load and volunteer motivation through an online survey using the Volunteer Function Inventory and the Stress Overload Scale. Comparisons between groups were conducted by applying t-tests or analysis of variance. The correlation between volunteer motivation and stress was analysed by Pearson correlation. Influencing factors of volunteer motivation were determined by multivariable linear regression models. A value of p<0.05 was used to declare statistical significance. RESULTS: The mean score of volunteer motivation of patient volunteers was 73.24 (SD 12.00), while that of stress load was 46.08 (SD 21.28). The mean scores of the personal vulnerability (PV) and event load (EL), two dimensions of stress load, were 26.99 (SD 12.46) and 19.09 (SD 9.63), respectively. The majority of the participants (136, 69.04%) were grouped in the low (PV)-low (EL) stress category. Participants' volunteer motivation was negatively correlated with stress load (r=-0.238, p<0.001), as well as PV (r=-0.188, p<0.01) and EL (r=-0.283, p<0.001). Multivariable linear regression analysis identified that the potential influencing factors of volunteer motivation were occupation (B=1.100, 95% CI 0.037 to 2.164, p=0.043), health condition (B=-3.302, 95% CI -5.287 to -1.317, p<0.001) and EL (B=-0.434, 95% CI -0.756 to -0.111, p=0.009). Participants who worked in the public sector, had better health conditions and had lower EL were more likely to have higher volunteer motivation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested that reducing stress load might be a possible pathway to encourage and maintain volunteerism in the FSH context. Implications and suggestions for future research on patient volunteer recruitment and management could be drawn from our findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Motivation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , Mobile Health Units , China/epidemiology , Volunteers
5.
Int J Infect Dis ; 130: 60-70, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2265428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Asymptomatic infections and mild diseases were more common during the Omicron outbreak in Shanghai, China in 2022. This study aimed to assess the characteristics and viral RNA decay between patients with asymptomatic and mild infections. METHODS: A total of 55,111 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 who were quarantined in the National Exhibition & Convention Center (Shanghai) Fangcang shelter hospital within 3 days after diagnosis from April 9 to May 23, 2022 were enrolled. The kinetics of cycle threshold (Ct) values of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were assessed. The influencing factors for disease progression and the risk factors for the viral RNA shedding time (VST) were investigated. RESULTS: On admission, 79.6% (43,852/55,111) of the cases were diagnosed with asymptomatic infections, and 20.4% were mild diseases. However, 78.0% of initially asymptomatic subjects developed mild diseases at the follow-up. The final proportion of asymptomatic infections was 17.5%. The median time of symptom onset, the duration of symptoms, and the VST were 2 days, 5 days, and 7 days, respectively. Female, age 19-40 years, underlying comorbidities with hypertension and diabetes, and vaccination were associated with higher risks of progressing to mildly symptomatic infections. In addition, mildly symptomatic infections were found to be associated with prolonged VST compared with asymptomatic infections. However, the kinetics of viral RNA decay and dynamics of Ct values were similar among asymptomatic subjects, patients with asymptomatic-to-mild infection, and patients with mild infection. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of initially diagnosed asymptomatic Omicron infections is in the presymptomatic stage. The Omicron infection has a much shorter incubation period and VST than previous variants. The infectivity of asymptomatic infections and mildly symptomatic infections with Omicron is similar.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Female , Young Adult , Adult , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Hospitals, Special , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units
6.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1073387, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2242670

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the clinical characteristics and risk factors of viral shedding time in mildly symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant (BA.2 and BA2.2) infection in Shanghai, and the effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment, so as to provide a reference basis for epidemic prevention, control and clinical treatment. Methods: A total of 6,134 asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic Omicron-infected patients admitted to Tianhua Road fangcang shelter hospital in Jinshan, Shanghai, between April 2022 and May 2022 were included. Demographic characteristics and clinical histories were collected and compared in subgroups according to the different durations of viral shedding. Spearman's correlation analysis was performed to explore the association between virus shedding time and clinical variables. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the risk factors for viral shedding time. Result: Most patients with asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic Omicron infection were male, and more than half of patients had a viral shedding time of 8-15 days. The patients were divided into three groups according to the time of viral shedding: short-duration (≤ 7 days), intermediate-duration (8-15 days) and long-duration group (≥16 days). The proportion of patients aged ≤ 29 years was the highest in the short-duration group (30.2%), whereas the proportion of patients aged 50-64 yeas was the highest in the long-duration group (37.9%). The proportion of patients with the chronic non-communicable diseases among the short-, intermediate- and long-duration groups was 6.2, 9.4, and 14.9%, respectively. Among them, hypertension was the most found (4.9, 7.8, and 11.7%, respectively). By multivariate analyses, we identified that viral shedding time of Omicron variants was independently negatively correlated with male patients, TCM treatment, and manual laborers, while it was independently positively associated with age and hypertension. Additionally, TCM treatment could significantly shorten the length of viral shedding time, especially for men, age ≥30 years, comorbid chronic non-communicable diseases, unemployed people and manual worker. Conclusions: Our results suggested that age and hypertension were independent risk factors for the duration of viral shedding in asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic omicron infected patients. TCM can effectively shorten viral shedding time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , Male , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Shedding , Hospitals, Special , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , China/epidemiology
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1048358, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2230560

ABSTRACT

The Omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected Shanghai, China, from March to June 2022. Numbers of Fangcang Shelter Hospitals (FSHs) were conversed from stadiums and exhibition centers to tackle the pandemic. This study aimed to identify the stress load profiles of nurses working in FSHs and explore the characteristics and factors influencing stress load profiles. Totally, 609 out of 700 FSH nurses (with an effective response rate of 87%) participated in an online survey investigating their socio-demographic information, work-related stressors, and stress load. Results of the latent profile analysis identified four classes of stress load, which were labeled as the low (Class 1), mild (Class 2), moderate (Class 3), and high (Class 4) stress load class. Maternity status and self-perceived health condition were significantly different between the four stress load classes by comparisons using the Chi-square test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. The contributors to the stress load profiles were determined by the multinomial logistic regression analysis, including age, education, maternity status, self-perceived health condition, working time in FSHs, and the four dimensions of work-related stressors. Participants who were less healthy (OR = 0.045, 95% CI:0.012,0.171), worked longer time in FSHs (OR = 40.483, 95% CI: 12.103,135.410), faced with more workload (OR = 3.664, 95% CI: 1.047,12.815), and worse working environment (OR = 12.274, 95% CI: 3.029,49.729) were more likely to be classified to the high stress load class. The task arrangement and working environment for FSH nurses should be optimized, and psychological training should be conducted routinely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , East Asian People , Hospitals , Nurses , Stress, Psychological , Female , Humans , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , East Asian People/psychology , Follicle Stimulating Hormone , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Special/statistics & numerical data , Mobile Health Units/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload/psychology , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Working Conditions/psychology , Working Conditions/statistics & numerical data , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1038296, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2224930

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic had a major impact on people's mental health. As the SAS-Cov-2 evolves to become less virulent, the number of asymptomatic patients increases. It remains unclear if the mild symptoms are associated with mild perceived stress and mental illness, and the interventions to improve the mental health of the patients are rarely reported. Methods: This cross-sectional study investigated the level of depression, anxiety and perceived stress of 1,305 COVID-19 patients who received treatment in the Fangcang shelter hospitals in Shanghai, China. Network analysis was used to explore the relationship among depression, anxiety and perceived stress. Results: The prevalence of depression, anxiety and perceived stress in the patients with Omicron infection were 9.03, 4.60, and 17.03%, respectively, lower than the prevalence reported during the initial outbreak of COVID-19. "Restlessness (A5)," "Uncontrollable worry (A2)," "Trouble relaxing (A4)" and "Fatigue (D4)" had the highest expected influence values. "Irritability (A6)" and "Uncontrollable (S1)" were bridge symptoms in the network. Comparative analysis of the network identified differences in the network structures between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Conclusion: This study investigated the prevalence of depression, anxiety and perceived stress and the correlation among them in Omicron-infected patients in Fangcang shelter hospital, in Shanghai, China. The core symptoms identified in the study provide insight into targeted clinical prevention and intervention of mental health in non-severe Omicron-infected patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1032957, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199504

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory-related disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). More than 200 countries worldwide are affected by this disease. The Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 is the major epidemic variant worldwide and is characterized by higher infectivity. However, the immunity and risk factors for prolonged viral elimination in patients with non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant infections are unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the relationship between immunity and duration of viral elimination in non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant-infected patients in Shanghai. Methods: In total, 108 non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant-infected patients from Shanghai New International Expo Center Fangcang Shelter Hospital were recruited in this study. They were further allocated to the early elimination (EE) and prolonged elimination (PE) groups according to SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid positivity duration. Results: Compared to patients with EE, those with PE had increased serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, and IL-8; higher neutrophil count and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR); lower lymphocyte, eosinophil, and red blood cell counts; and lower concentrations of hemoglobin and albumin (ALB). In lymphocyte subpopulation analysis, lower numbers of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and NK cells and a higher CD4/CD8 ratio were observed in patients with PE. In addition, correlation analysis results revealed that cycle threshold values of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant ORF1ab and N were negatively correlated with IL-6 and IL-8 levels and positively correlated with eosinophil count in patients with COVID-19. Finally, multivariate regression analysis showed that ALB, CD4/CD8 ratio, NLR, and eosinophil count were predictors of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant elimination. Conclusion: In this study, we identified that the ALB, CD4/CD8 ratio, NLR, and eosinophil count were risk factors for prolonged viral elimination in non-severe SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant-infected patients. These factors might be efficient indicators in the diagnosis, evaluation, and prognosis monitoring of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Virus Shedding , Humans , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Hospitals, Special , Interleukin-6 , Interleukin-8 , Mobile Health Units , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2203, 2022 11 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2139241

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the psychological experience of Juvenile patient's parents in Fangcang shelter hospital during the Omicron wave of COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted by using a phenomenological research method. Sixteen parents of juvenile patients with COVID-19 were recruited from National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai, China) Fangcang shelter hospital (FSH) using purposive sampling. Data were collected by face-to-face in-depth interviews over 27 days, from April 9 to May 6, 2022. The interview data were analyzed using Colaizzi seven-step analysis method. RESULTS: The psychological experiences of the parents of juvenile patients in the Fangcang shelter hospital were summarized into three themes: "perception regarding the FSH", "worried about the unmet needs of juvenile patients ", and "the psychological burden after discharge". These themes were classified into 9 sub-themes, including the acceptance of FSH, adaptability to FSH, concerns about cross-infection in the FSH, special needs of infants and young children, psychological needs of preschool children, the learning demands of school-age children, concern about re-positive, fear of sequelae, worry about social acceptance. CONCLUSION: Juvenile patients and their parents in the Fangcang shelter hospitals have both positive and negative experiences. It is suggested that facilities for minors should be planned in advance. Humanistic care for adolescent patients and health education for the public are also critical.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Infant , Child, Preschool , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Special , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Mobile Health Units , Hospitals , Parents , Follicle Stimulating Hormone
11.
Artif Intell Med ; 135: 102456, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119903

ABSTRACT

This study mainly aims to develop two effective and practical multi-criteria group decision-making approaches by taking advantage of the ground-breaking theory of PROMETHEE family of outranking methods. The presented variants of Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) method are acknowledged to address the complex decision-making problems carrying the ambiguous information, expressible in terms of yes, no, abstinence and refusal, owing to the preeminent condition and wider structure of spherical fuzzy sets. Both of the proposed approaches seek help from the Shannon's entropy formula to evaluate the object weights of the decision criteria. The proposed techniques operate by taking into account the deviation between each pair of potential alternatives in accordance to different types of preference functions to determine the preference indices. The proposed technique of spherical fuzzy PROMETHEE I method carefully compares the positive and negative outranking flows of the alternative to get partial rankings. In contrast, the spherical fuzzy PROMETHEE II method has the edge to eliminate the incomparable pair by employing the net outranking flow to derive the final ranking. The application of proposed approaches is explained via a case study in the field of medical concerning the selection of appropriate site to establish Fangcang shelter hospital in Wuhan to treat COVID-19 patients. The convincing comparisons of the proposed methodologies with q-rung orthopair fuzzy PROMETHEE and spherical fuzzy TOPSIS methods are also included to verify the aptitude of the proposed methodology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fuzzy Logic , Humans , Hospitals, Special , Mobile Health Units , Decision Making
12.
BMJ Open ; 12(9): e065799, 2022 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029506

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to examine COVID-19 patients' experiences in a Fangcang shelter hospital in China, to provide insights into the effectiveness of this centralised isolation strategy as a novel solution to patient management during emerging infectious disease outbreaks. DESIGN: This study adopted a qualitative descriptive design. Data were collected by individual semistructured interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. SETTING: This study was undertaken in 1 of the 16 Fangcang shelter hospitals in Wuhan, China between 28 February 2020 and 7 March 2020. Fangcang shelter hospitals were temporary healthcare facilities intended for large-scale centralised isolation, treatment and disease monitoring of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 cases. These hospitals were an essential component of China's response to the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 27 COVID-19 patients were recruited by purposive sampling. Eligible participants were (1) COVID-19 patients; (2) above 18 years of age and (3) able to communicate effectively. Exclusion criteria were (1) being clinically or emotionally unstable and (2) experiencing communication difficulties. RESULTS: Three themes and nine subthemes were identified. First, COVID-19 patients experienced a range of psychological reactions during hospitalisation, including fear, uncertainty, helplessness and concerns. Second, there were positive and negative experiences associated with communal living. While COVID-19 patients' evaluation of essential services in the hospital was overall positive, privacy and hygiene issues were highlighted as stressors during their hospital stay. Third, positive peer support and a trusting patient-healthcare professional relationship served as a birthplace for resilience, trust and gratitude in COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, while sacrificing privacy, centralised isolation has the potential to mitigate negative psychological impacts of social isolation in COVID-19 patients by promoting meaningful peer connections, companionship and support within the shared living space. To our knowledge, this is the first study bringing patients' perspectives into healthcare service appraisal in emergency shelter hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics
13.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 28(5): e13085, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1968138

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate the current condition and degree of fear of disease progression and associated factors in patients with mild or common type COVID-19. BACKGROUND: At the end of 2019, COVID-19 spread from Wuhan in Hubei Province throughout China. Confirmed cases and deaths have since been reported in many countries around the world. However, fear of progression in these patients has been poorly explored. METHODS: During February 2020, we recruited 114 patients with mild or common type COVID-19 admitted to a Fangcang shelter hospital. We assessed patients' degree of fear using the simplified Fear of Progression Questionnaire (Chinese version). Multiple regression analysis was applied to explore potential factors. RESULTS: The fear of disease progression scores of patients with mild or common COVID-19 was at the low-to-moderate level. Current unemployment, disease duration of 28 days or more and not having a spouse diagnosed with COVID-19 were factors potentially associated with fear of progression. CONCLUSION: With a high prevalence of fear of disease progression in patients with COVID-19, the risk of psychological effects from the pandemic is significant and fear of progression is one of the manifestations. The need for psychological support services for patients should be included in all pandemic and disaster planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Fear , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Mobile Health Units , Phobic Disorders , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Front Public Health ; 10: 876558, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1929656

ABSTRACT

In the event of pandemic, it is essential for government authority to implement responses to control the pandemic and protect people's health with rapidity and efficicency. In this study, we first develop an evaluation framework consisting of the entropy weight method (EWM) and the technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) to identify the preliminary selection of Fangcang shelter hospitals; next, we consider the timeliness of isolation and treatment of patients with different degrees of severity of the infectious disease, with the referral to and triage in Fangcang shelter hospitals characterized and two optimization models developed. The computational results of Model 1 and Model 2 are compared and analyzed. A case study in Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province, China, is used to demonstrate the real-life applicability of the proposed models. The two-stage localization method gives decision-makers more options in case of emergencies and can effectively designate the location. This article may give recommendations of and new insights into parameter settings in isolation hospital for governments and public health managers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Mobile Health Units , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Front Public Health ; 10: 909241, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903242

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) broke out in 2019. In the past 4 years, China has adopted many measures to control the epidemic, including building Fangcang shelter hospitals to isolate confirmed positive cases. Therefore, we aim to explore the mental health status of medical staff in the Wuhan Fangcang shelter hospital and discuss the relevant factors that affect the medical staff's mental status. The subjects of the research were staff from several Fangcang shelter hospitals in Wuhan during the epidemic of COVID-19. Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items Scale (PHQ-9) was used to assess the severity of the participants' depressive symptoms, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items Scale (GAD-7) was used to evaluate the severity of the participants' anxiety symptoms. The demographic information and health adjustment methods were collected in a self-made questionnaire, and regression analysis on related factors that affect mental health was performed. The three most frequently used methods of psychological adjustment for the staff in the Fangcang shelter hospital are common recreational activities, such as reading, streaming videos, listening to music, and playing games. (93.8%), communicating with colleagues in the Fangcang shelter hospital (92.5%), and communicating with family members and friends (78.3%). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that developing depression symptoms has relation to 2 factors, which are having not participated in medical emergency rescue missions (odds ratio = 2.610; 95% confidence interval 1.398-4.872, P = 0.003) and inadequate training before entering the shelter hospital (odds ratio = 2.804, 95% confidence interval 1.293-6.08, P = 0.009). Compared with adequate pre-job training, insufficient training increases the risk of anxiety symptoms (odds ratio = 2.692; 95% confidence interval 1.3-5.575, P = 0.008). Lack of experience and inadequate training in medical emergency rescue missions exposed the medical staff to a higher risk of developing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Psychological adjustment methods that are helpful to adjust their mental state are most commonly used.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders , Big Data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Medical Staff , Mobile Health Units , SARS-CoV-2
17.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(3): e220873, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1849926

ABSTRACT

Importance: Early in the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the M Health Fairview Hospital System established dedicated hospitals for establishing cohorts and caring for patients with COVID-19, yet the association between treatment at COVID-19-dedicated hospitals and mortality and complications is not known. Objective: To analyze the mortality rate and complications associated with treatment at the COVID-19-dedicated hospitals. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study evaluated data prospectively collected from March 1, 2020, through June 30, 2021, from 11 hospitals in Minnesota, including 2 hospitals created solely to care for patients with COVID-19. Data obtained included demographic characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of interest for all patients with a confirmed COVID-19 infection admitted to this hospital system during the study period. Exposures: Patients were grouped based on whether they received treatment from 1 of the 2 COVID-19-dedicated hospitals compared with the remainder of the hospitals within the hospital system. Main Outcomes and Measures: Multivariate analyses, including risk-adjusted logistic regression and propensity score matching, were performed to evaluate the primary outcome of in-hospital mortality and secondary outcomes, including complications and use of COVID-specific therapeutics. Results: There were 5504 patients with COVID-19 admitted during the study period (median age, 62.5 [IQR, 45.0-75.6] years; 2854 women [51.9%]). Of these, 2077 patients (37.7%) (median age, 63.4 [IQR, 50.7-76.1] years; 1080 men [52.0%]) were treated at 1 of the 2 COVID-19-dedicated hospitals compared with 3427 (62.3%; median age, 62.0 [40.0-75.1] years; 1857 women (54.2%) treated at other hospitals. The mortality rate was 11.6% (n = 241) at the dedicated hospitals compared with 8.0% (n = 274) at the other hospitals (P < .001). However, risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality was significantly lower for patients in the COVID-19-dedicated hospitals in both the unmatched group (n = 2077; odds ratio [OR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.59-0.95) and the propensity score-matched group (n = 1317; OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.58-0.99). The rate of overall complications in the propensity score-matched group was significantly lower (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.99) and the use of COVID-19-specific therapeutics including deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis (83.9% vs 56.9%; P < .001), high-dose corticosteroids (56.1% vs 22.2%; P < .001), remdesivir (61.5% vs 44.5%; P < .001), and tocilizumab (7.9% vs 2.0; P < .001) was significantly higher. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, COVID-19-dedicated hospitals had multiple benefits, including providing high-volume repetitive treatment and isolating patients with the infection. This experience suggests improved in-hospital mortality for patients treated at dedicated hospitals owing to improved processes of care and supports the use of establishing cohorts for future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Special , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Minnesota/epidemiology , Multivariate Analysis , Odds Ratio , Propensity Score , Quality of Health Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 28(5): e13054, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779234

ABSTRACT

AIM: We aim to investigate the prevalence and associated factors for compassion fatigue among nurses in Fangcang Shelter Hospitals in Wuhan. Studies have shown that compassion fatigue was more common among nurses than other health-care providers, and its predictors were also different. In recent years, most studies have investigated compassion fatigue in emergency and oncology nurses, whereas there is little information on compassion fatigue among nurses from the frontline of Fangcang Shelter Hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used in this study. An online survey was conducted among nurses (n = 972) of five Fangcang Shelter Hospitals in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, from 6 March to 10 March 2020. A self-administered questionnaire including demographic information, work-related information, General Health Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale and Compassion Fatigue Scale was used. RESULTS: The prevalence of compassion fatigue among nurses in Fangcang Shelter Hospitals was moderate, and most cases were mild. There was a significant relationship between compassion fatigue and work-related factors, mental health and perceived stress among nurses working in Fangcang Shelter Hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Various factors contribute to compassion fatigue, including lower job satisfaction and job adaptability, less praise from patients, more fear of infection and more perceived stress. A good working atmosphere, organizational support and psychological consultation are essential to alleviate nurses' compassion fatigue during the anti-epidemic period.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Compassion Fatigue/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Empathy , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Mobile Health Units , Pandemics , Prevalence , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Folia Med Cracov ; 61(4): 5-44, 2021 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700594

ABSTRACT

The complex course of the COVID-19 and the distant complications of the SARS-CoV-2 infection still remain an unfaded challenge for modern medicine. The care of patients with the symptomatic course of COVID-19 exceeds the competence of a single specialty, often requiring a multispecialist approach. The CRACoV-HHS (CRAcow in CoVid pandemic - Home, Hospital and Staff) project has been developed by a team of scientists and clinicians with the aim of optimizing medical care at hospital and ambulatory settings and treatment of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The CRACoV project integrates 26 basic and clinical research from multiple medical disciplines, involving different populations infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus and exposed to infection. Between January 2021 and April 2022 we plan to recruit subjects among patients diagnosed and treated in the University Hospital in Cracow, the largest public hospital in Poland, i.e. 1) patients admitted to the hospital due to COVID-19 [main module: 'Hospital']; 2) patients with signs of infection who have been confirmed as having SARS-CoV-2 infection and have been referred to home isolation due to their mild course (module: 'Home isolation'); 3) patients with symptoms of infection and high exposure to SARS- CoV-2 who have a negative RT-PCR test result. In addition, survey in various professional groups of hospital employees, both medical and non-medical, and final-fifth year medical students (module: 'Staff') is planned. The project carries both scientific and practical dimension and is expected to develop a multidisciplinary model of care of COVID-19 patients as well as recommendations for the management of particular groups of patients including: asymptomatic patient or with mild symptoms of COVID-19; symptomatic patients requiring hospitalization due to more severe clinical course of disease and organ complications; patient requiring surgery; patient with diabetes; patient requiring psychological support; patient with undesirable consequences of pharmacological treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Crit Care Med ; 50(2): 256-263, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691786

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adult patients with coronavirus disease 2019 requiring weaning from prolonged mechanical ventilation. DESIGN: Observational cohort study of patients admitted to two long-term acute care hospitals from April 1, 2020, to March 31, 2021. SETTING: Two long-term acute care hospitals specialized in weaning from prolonged mechanical ventilation in the Chicagoland area, Illinois, United States. PATIENTS: Adult (≥ 18 yr old) ICU survivors of respiratory failure caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pneumonia receiving prolonged mechanical ventilation. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During the study period, 158 consecutive patients were transferred to the long-term acute care hospitals for weaning from prolonged ventilation. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected and analyzed. Final date of follow-up was June 1, 2021. Prior to long-term acute care hospital transfer, median length of stay at the acute care hospital was 41.0 days and median number of ventilator days was 35. Median age was 60.0 years, 34.8% of patients were women, 91.8% had a least one comorbidity, most commonly hypertension (65.8%) and diabetes (53.2%). The percentage of weaning success was 70.9%. The median duration of successful weaning was 8 days. Mortality was 9.6%. As of June 1, 2021, 19.0% of patients had been discharged home, 70.3% had been discharged to other facilities, and 1.3% were still in the long-term acute care hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients with coronavirus disease 2019 transferred to two Chicago-area long-term acute care hospitals successfully weaned from prolonged mechanical ventilation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospitals, Special , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilator Weaning , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Chicago/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Patient Transfer , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Treatment Outcome
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