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1.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1653-1660, 2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572711

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Educational interventions targeting health care professionals can contribute to improving knowledge and behaviors of antimicrobial agents prescribing. However, the unprecedented COVID-19 outbreak caused a disruption of the current practices and treatment guidelines. Therefore, it is highly likely that the pandemic had its disruptive effect on any educational interventions that were going on during the outbreak. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention in improving antimicrobial agents prescribing. METHODOLOGY: This was a randomized controlled study that included 69 resident physicians in a teaching hospital. The intervention group received an educational intervention focusing on antimicrobial agents prescribing and resistance. Before and after the intervention, outpatient antimicrobial agents prescribing rates for the two study arms were compared for the pre- and post-intervention periods. Additionally, all participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire that measured their knowledge, attitudes and behavioral intention towards antimicrobial agents resistance and prescription. The post-intervention period included the months of February, March, and June 2020. April and May were excluded from the study period since clinics were closed due to the COVID -19 pandemic. RESULTS: Post-intervention, the rate of antimicrobial agents prescribing by the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.001). Mean fear score for the intervention group was significantly lower than that for the control group after the intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate failure of the educational intervention in improving antimicrobial agents prescribing. However, an unexpected counter effect of the COVID-19 outbreak is highly likely.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Curriculum , Education, Medical , Fear , Female , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Jordan , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Am J Manag Care ; 27(11): e365, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1552170

ABSTRACT

This letter describes the experience of long-stay patients and provides a perspective of the need for more studies on outliers' impact on health care.


Subject(s)
Hospitals, Teaching , Colombia , Humans , Length of Stay
3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 1174, 2021 Nov 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 vaccines provide renewed hope in the fight against the recent pandemic. To ensure widespread vaccination, it is crucial to analyze vaccine willingness and its determinants among physicians, key health care influencers. This study aimed to assess acceptance rate and identify factors associated with vaccine hesitancy among Thai physicians. METHODS: A cross-sectional online-based questionnaire was distributed to all physicians at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital during March 31, 2021 to April 30, 2021 in order to assess their attitudes toward receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Reasons for vaccine acceptance and refusal as well as predictors of vaccine hesitancy were analyzed by bivariate and multivariable analysis. RESULTS: A total of 705 complete responses were received with 95.6% (n = 675) of physicians expressing willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Only one of the 31 physicians (4.4%) who expressed a hesitancy or unwillingness to be vaccinated was a faculty member; the others were physicians-in-training. Approximately one-fifths of physicians surveyed were also not willing to recommend the vaccine to their family members (21.4%, n = 151) or patients (18.7%, n = 132). Using multivariable logistic regression, vaccine hesitancy was independently associated with preference for particular vaccines over the government allocated option, especially for mRNA vaccine (aOR 8.86; 95% CI 1.1-71.54; p = 0.041). Vaccine literacy showed an inverse relationship (aOR 0.34; 95% CI 0.13-0.9; p = 0.029) with vaccine hesitancy. Uncertainty of the vaccine efficacy (83.9%) and fear of adverse events (48.4%) were major concerns contributing to vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSION: This study revealed a high rate of physician willingness to take the COVID-19 vaccine especially among staffs; however, a significant proportion would not currently suggest vaccination to their families or patients. Restrictions on vaccine choice and vaccine illiteracy, together with concerns over adverse effects and uncertainty of efficacy, were associated with negative attitudes toward vaccination. To raise acceptance of the vaccination program, efforts should be made to balance individual preference for vaccine type in addition to increasing the availability of accurate data on safety and efficacy for each vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Teaching , Hospitals, University , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Thailand , Universities , Vaccination
4.
Physiotherapy ; 113: 153-159, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525919

ABSTRACT

In this short report the authors characterise inpatient bed occupancy and predicted rehabilitation need of patients cared for in two acute hospitals of a large London NHS Trust during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, including 394 people with confirmed COVID-19. Data were captured on a single day (17th April 2020) from the two Trust hospitals to inform discharge planning in line with national COVID-19 Hospital Discharge Service policy guidance. Our data suggests that the proportion of COVID-19 patients predicted to require rehabilitation upon hospital discharge may be greater than the estimates described in the national COVID-19 Hospital Discharge Service policy guidance; posing the question is there a demand-capacity mismatch between rehabilitation need and service provision as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic?


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , London/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Saudi Med J ; 42(7): 742-749, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513260

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify the prevalence of COVID-19 antibodies among operating room and critical care staff. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 319 Healthcare workers employed in the operation theater and intensive care unit of King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), a tertiary teaching hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between August 9, 2020 and November 2, 2020. All participants completed a 20-item questionnaire on demographic data and COVID-19 risk factors and provided blood samples. Antibody testing was performed using an in-house enzyme immunoassay and microneutralization test. RESULTS: Of the 319 participants, 39 had detectable COVID-19 antibodies. Five of them had never experienced any symptoms suggestive of COVID-19, and only 19 were previously diagnosed with COVID-19. The odds of developing COVID-19 or having corresponding antibodies increased if participants experienced COVID-19 symptoms (odds ratio [OR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-7.5) or reported contact with an infected family member (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 2.5-11.2). Disease acquisition was not associated with employment in the ICU and involvement in the intubation of or close contact with COVID-19 patients. Of the 19 previously diagnosed participants, 6 did not possess any detectable COVID-19 antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers may have undiagnosed COVID-19, and those previously infected may not have long-lasting immunity. Therefore, hospitals must continue to uphold strict infection control during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Male , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms , Pandemics , Prevalence , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
6.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e050812, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504736

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This survey aimed to assess the awareness and readiness of healthcare providers to use telemonitoring (TM) technologies for managing diabetes patients as well as to identify associated factors in Ethiopia. DESIGN: An institution-based cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted by using a pretested self-administered questionnaire from February to March 2020. Data analysis used a binary logistic regression and partial proportional odds model for factor identification. PARTICIPANTS: Randomly selected 423 study physicians and nurses. SETTING: This study was conducted at the University of Gondar and Tibebe Ghion specialised teaching referral hospitals. OUTCOME MEASURES: Awareness and readiness towards TM in diabetes care. RESULT: Out of 406 healthcare providers (69.7%, n=283 nurses and 30.3%, n=123 physicians) who completed the survey, 345 (38.7%) heard about TM, when it came to readiness, 321 (25.1%) and 121 (65.5%) of respondents had average and low readiness towards TM, respectively. The result of regression analysis shows that awareness towards TM was higher among respondents who had access to a computer (adjusted OR (AOR): 2.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 7.1)), computer-related training (AOR: 4.6 (95% CI 1.63 to 12.95)) and those who had the experience of supporting patients through digital tools (AOR: 1.7 (95% CI 1.0 to 2.8)). Self-perceived innovators and those who had access to a computer, computer-related training and favourable attitude towards TM had significantly higher readiness to use TM. CONCLUSION: The findings of this survey revealed low awareness and readiness of participant's towards TM. However, this study suggests the need of improving participant's attitudes, access to smartphones and computers and technical skills to fill this gap.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Health Facilities , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Ethiopia , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Acta Biomed ; 92(S6): e2021447, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504263

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Seasonal influenza exerts a deep and multi-level impact on population and public health systems. Among at risk groups, healthcare workers (HCWs) represent a crucial one due to the threat of absenteeism and consequent disruption of healthcare services (and economic losses). Also in this group vaccine hesitancy is a well known issue, therefore innovative and 360-degree strategies are urgently needed to overcome the problem. METHODS: in the 2020-21 influenza vaccination campaign in a research and teaching hospital in Milan, Italy, the working group implemented three different strategies: the offer of vaccination through both an ad hoc ambulatory and several itinerant (on site) vaccinating teams, a promotional and educational communication campaign, a gaming strategy Results: vaccinated employees nearly doubled (2103 vs 1153 in 2019-20 flu vaccination campaign), reaching a comprehensive vaccination coverage rate (VCR) of 43,1%. A highly significant increase in the 40-59 age group was registered. While physicians and nursing staff confirmed to be the most represented categories among vaccinated subjects, administrative and auxiliary staffs performed the greatest increase compared to the previous campaign. The on site vaccination was clearly preferred than the ad hoc one (1693 HCWs, 80,5% vs 410, 19,5%). Vaccinated for the first time registered a significant increase (40,2% vs 36,2% in 2019-20 campaign). CONCLUSIONS: such meaningful results confirm the effectiveness of the strategies implemented in the present campaign, suggesting their possible application in the debated COVID19-third-dose vaccination campaign.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , COVID-19 Vaccines , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Immunization Programs , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
8.
Arch. argent. pediatr ; 119(5): 317-324, oct. 2021. tab, ilus
Article in English, Spanish | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1502723

ABSTRACT

Introducción. Los trabajadores de la salud se encuentran sometidos a una gran tensión en el desarrollo de sus actividades, lo que genera alta frecuencia de estrés, desgaste laboral e impacto psicopatológico. La pandemia de COVID-19 podría provocar un incremento de estas entidades en los médicos. El objetivo fue describir la frecuencia de estrés, síndrome de desgaste profesional (burnout), ansiedad y depresión durante la pandemia, y analizar las asociaciones con distintas variables independientes. Métodos. Estudio observacional, transversal, realizado dos meses después del inicio de la cuarentena en Argentina. Se encuestó a médicos de especialidades clínicas, quirúrgicas, solo de emergencias, y a aquellos sin contacto directo con pacientes, mediante un cuestionario sociodemográfico y tres inventarios autoadministrados: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory y la Escala de ansiedad y depresión hospitalaria. Resultados. La prevalencia de estrés fue del 93,7 % (IC95 %: 90,33-96,2), burnout 73,5 % (IC95 %: 68,2-78,4), ansiedad 44 % (IC95 %: 38,4-49,8) y depresión 21,9 % (IC95 %: 17,3-26,9). No se observó asociación entre la frecuencia y el tipo de especialidad realizada. La frecuencia de burnout, ansiedad y depresión fue significativamente mayor en los médicos residentes y en aquellos que trabajan en emergencias. Conclusiones. Los médicos residentes y quienes trabajan en emergencias en turnos de 24 horas mostraron porcentajes significativamente más altos de burnout, ansiedad y depresión, en comparación con médicos de planta y con aquellos en posiciones de liderazgo. Estos hallazgos pueden estar asociados con una mayor carga de trabajo y una menor experiencia. Es mandatorio tomar medidas preventivas y terapéuticas para preservar a quienes hacen frente a esta pandemia.


Introduction. Health care workers experience a tremendous strain while performing their activities, very frequently leading to stress, burnout syndrome, and psychopathological impact. The COVID-19 pandemic may cause physicians to suffer these effects even to a greater extent. Our objective was to describe the frequency of stress, burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression during the pandemic, and analyze the associations with different independent outcome measures. Methods. Observational, cross-sectional study conducted 2 months after the lockdown was established in Argentina. Clinical specialists, surgeons, emergency physicians, and those with no direct contact with patients were surveyed using a sociodemographic questionnaire and 3 self-administered inventories: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results. The prevalence of stress was 93.7 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 90.33-96.2), burnout syndrome 73.5 % (95 % CI: 68.2-78.4), anxiety 44 % (95 % CI: 38.4-49.8), and depression 21.9 % (95 % CI: 17.3-26.9). No association was observed between the frequency and medical specialty. The frequency of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression was significantly higher among residents and physicians working in the emergency department. Conclusions. Residents and emergency physicians working 24-hour shifts showed significantly higher percentages of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression compared to staff and head physicians. These findings may be associated with a higher workload and less experience. It is compulsory to take preventive and therapeutic measures to protect those in the pandemic front line.


Subject(s)
Humans , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Hospitals, Teaching
9.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(9): 1252-1256, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478143

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the role of environmental cleaning in controlling infection transmission in hospitals. However, cleaning practice remains inadequate. An important component of effective cleaning is to obtain feedback on actual cleaning practice. This study aimed to evaluate the cleaning process quality from an implementation perspective. METHODOLOGY: An observational study was conducted in a tertiary public hospital in Wuhan, China and 92 cleaning processes of units housing patients with multidrug-resistant organism infections were recorded. The bed unit cleaning quality and floor cleaning quality were measured by six and five process indicators respectively. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the cleaning quality. RESULTS: For bed unit cleaning quality, the appropriate rates of cleaning sequence, adherence to cleaning unit principle, use of cloth, use of cloth bucket, separation of clean and contaminated tools, and disinfectant concentration were 35.9%, 71.7%, 89.7%, 11.5%, 65.4%, and 48.7%, respectively. For floor cleaning quality, the appropriate rates of adherence to cleaning unit principle, use of cloth, use of cloth bucket, separation of clean and contaminated tools, and disinfectant concentration were 13.4%, 50.0%, 35.5%, 11.0%, and 36.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The cleaning staff showed poor environmental cleaning quality, especially the floor cleaning quality. The findings can help reveal deficiencies in cleaning practices, raise awareness of these deficiencies, and inform targeted strategies to improve cleaning quality and hospital safety.


Subject(s)
Disinfection/methods , Infection Control/methods , China , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disinfection/standards , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Guideline Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Public , Hospitals, Teaching , Infection Control/standards , Tertiary Care Centers
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e051573, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476605

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the SARS-CoV-2 infection rate among hospital healthcare workers after the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, and provide more knowledge in the understanding of the relationship between infection, symptomatology and source of infection. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study in healthcare workers. SETTING: Northern Limburg, the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: All employees of VieCuri Medical Center (n=3300) were invited to enrol in current study. In total 2507 healthcare workers participated. INTERVENTION: Between 22 June 2020 and 3 July 2020, participants provided venous blood samples voluntarily, which were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies with the Wantai SARS-CoV-2 Ig total ELISA test. Work characteristics, exposure risks and prior symptoms consistent with COVID-19 were gathered through a survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Proportion of healthcare workers with positive SARS-CoV-2 serology. RESULTS: The overall seroprevalence was 21.1% (n=530/2507). Healthcare workers between 17 and 30 years were more likely to have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies compared with participants >30 years. The probability of having SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was comparable for healthcare workers with and without direct patient (OR 1.42, 95% CI 0.86 to 2.34) and COVID-19 patient contact (OR 1.62, 95% CI 0.80 to 3.33). On the contrary, exposure to COVID-19 positive coworkers (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.93) and household members (OR 6.09, 95% CI 2.23 to 16.64) was associated with seropositivity. Of those healthcare workers with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, 16% (n=85/530) had not experienced any prior COVID-19-related symptoms. Only fever and anosmia were associated with seropositivity (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.42 to 2.55 and OR 10.51, 95% CI 7.86 to 14.07). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers caring for hospitalised COVID-19 patients were not at an increased risk of infection, most likely as a result of taking standard infection control measures into consideration. These data show that compliance with infection control measures is essential to control secondary transmission and constrain the spread of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Pandemics , Seroepidemiologic Studies
11.
Acta Biomed ; 92(S6): e2021450, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472541

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Comirnaty® was the first COVID-19 vaccine available for the vaccination campaign of healthcare workers in Italy. With the aim of assessing vaccine safety, we conducted a cross-sectional survey administrating a voluntary-based questionnaire on adverse events following immunisation (AEFIs) in San Raffaele Hospital, Milano, Italy. METHODS: From 4th January 2021 to 27th April 2021, we collected 2,659 questionnaires (response rate: 24,5%). We analyzed data, reporting AEFIs by gender, age, self-reported severity, type, time of insurgence and duration, and estimating relative-risk ratios (RRR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: The most reported symptoms were injection site pain, fatigue, headache, myalgia, chills, fever, and arthralgia. Severe systemic reactions were more frequent after receiving the second dose (RRR 6.25, 95% CI 4.57-8.55), in women (RRR 3.33, 95% CI 2.30-4.82), and less frequent in individuals aged 60 or more (RRR 0.26, 95% CI 0.14-0.49). In addition, we noted a wide range of adverse events of special interest (AESIs). CONCLUSIONS: Consistently with clinical trials and pharmacovigilance surveillance, AEFIs were frequent, but severe ones were uncommon, supporting the massive implementation of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign and providing valuable data for a risk profiling of vaccinees. (www.actabiomedica.it).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , RNA, Messenger , Vaccination/adverse effects
12.
Nurs Open ; 8(6): 3161-3169, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460255

ABSTRACT

AIM: The study explored the experiences of women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy at Ho Teaching Hospital. DESIGN: A qualitative design which was exploratory and descriptive in nature was employed. METHODS: Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview guide. Saturation of data was reached after the eighth participant was interviewed. The interviews were audio-recorded and lasted between 30-70 min, and the data were analysed concurrently with data collection using content analysis. Three major themes emerged. RESULTS: Participants experienced hair loss, changes in skin and nail pigmentation and social isolation. The study further revealed that inadequate access to information from healthcare providers and lack of resources coupled with financial constraints were among the major challenges participants faced. However, varied supports from significant others were of much help which enabled participants to go through their chemotherapy successfully.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Female , Ghana/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Qualitative Research
13.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 26(1): 99, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448180

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this article, we aim to share our experience in the hospital reorganization made to conduct the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaign, based on the principles of flexibility and adaptability. STUDY DESIGN: A descriptive study. METHODS: The data concerning the organization of the vaccination campaign were taken from the operative protocol developed by the hospital dedicated task force, composed by experts in hygiene, public health, occupational medicine, pharmacists, nurses, hospital quality, and disaster managers. Data about the numbers of vaccine administered daily were collected by the Innovation and Development Operative Unit database. RESULTS: Vaccinations against COVID-19 started across the EU on the 27th of December 2020. The first phase of the vaccination campaign carried out in our hospital was directed to healthcare workers immunization including medical residents, social care operators, administrative staff and technicians, students of medicine, and health professions trainees. The second phase was enlarged to the coverage of extremely fragile subjects. Thanks to the massive employment of healthcare workers and the establishment of dynamic pathways, it was possible to achieve short turnaround times and a large number of doses administered daily, with peaks of 870 vaccines per day. From the 27th of December up to the 14th of March a total of 26,341 doses of Pfizer have been administered. 13,584 were first doses and 12,757 were second doses. From the 4th to the 14th of March, 296 first doses of Moderna were dispensed. It was necessary to implement adequate spaces and areas adopting anti-contagion safety measures: waiting area for subjects to be vaccinated, working rooms for the dilution of the vaccine and the storage of the material, vaccination rooms, post-vaccination observation areas, room for observation, and treatment of any adverse reactions, with an emergency cart available in each working area. CONCLUSIONS: The teaching hospital of Pisa faced the beginning of the immunization campaign readjusting its spaces, planning an adequate hospital vaccination area and providing an organization plan to ensure the achievement of the targets of the campaign. This represented a challenge due to limited vaccine doses supplied and the multisectoral teams of professionals to coordinate in the shortest time and the safest way possible. The organizational model adopted proved to be adequate and therefore exploited also for the second phase aimed to extremely fragile subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Humans , Italy/epidemiology
14.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(5): 317-324, 2021 10.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441336

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health care workers experience a tremendous strain while performing their activities, very frequently leading to stress, burnout syndrome, and psychopathological impact. The COVID-19 pandemic may cause physicians to suffer these effects even to a greater extent. Our objective was to describe the frequency of stress, burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression during the pandemic, and analyze the associations with different independent outcome measures. METHODS: Observational, cross-sectional study conducted 2 months after the lockdown was established in Argentina. Clinical specialists, surgeons, emergency physicians, and those with no direct contact with patients were surveyed using a sociodemographic questionnaire and 3 self-administered inventories: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: The prevalence of stress was 93.7 % (95 % confidence interval [CI]: 90.33-96.2), burnout syndrome 73.5 % (95 % CI: 68.2-78.4), anxiety 44 % (95 % CI: 38.4-49.8), and depression 21.9 % (95 % CI: 17.3-26.9). No association was observed between the frequency and medical specialty. The frequency of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression was significantly higher among residents and physicians working in the emergency department. CONCLUSIONS: Residents and emergency physicians working 24-hour shifts showed significantly higher percentages of burnout syndrome, anxiety, and depression compared to staff and head physicians. These findings may be associated with a higher workload and less experience. It is compulsory to take preventive and therapeutic measures to protect those in the pandemic front line.


Introducción. Los trabajadores de la salud se encuentran sometidos a una gran tensión en el desarrollo de sus actividades, lo que genera alta frecuencia de estrés, desgaste laboral e impacto psicopatológico. La pandemia de COVID-19 podría provocar un incremento de estas entidades en los médicos. El objetivo fue describir la frecuencia de estrés, síndrome de desgaste profesional (burnout), ansiedad y depresión durante la pandemia, y analizar las asociaciones con distintas variables independientes. Métodos. Estudio observacional, transversal, realizado dos meses después del inicio de la cuarentena en Argentina. Se encuestó a médicos de especialidades clínicas, quirúrgicas, solo de emergencias, y a aquellos sin contacto directo con pacientes, mediante un cuestionario sociodemográfico y tres inventarios autoadministrados: Health Professions Stress Inventory, Maslach Burnout Inventory y la Escala de ansiedad y depresión hospitalaria. Resultados. La prevalencia de estrés fue del 93,7 % (IC95 %: 90,33-96,2), burnout 73,5 % (IC95 %: 68,2-78,4), ansiedad 44 % (IC95 %: 38,4- 49,8) y depresión 21,9 % (IC95 %: 17,3-26,9). No se observó asociación entre la frecuencia y el tipo de especialidad realizada. La frecuencia de burnout, ansiedad y depresión fue significativamente mayor en los médicos residentes y en aquellos que trabajan en emergencias. Conclusiones. Los médicos residentes y quienes trabajan en emergencias en turnos de 24 horas mostraron porcentajes significativamente más altos de burnout, ansiedad y depresión, en comparación con médicos de planta y con aquellos en posiciones de liderazgo. Estos hallazgos pueden estar asociados con una mayor carga de trabajo y una menor experiencia. Es mandatorio tomar medidas preventivas y terapéuticas para preservar a quienes hacen frente a esta pandemia. Palabras clave: COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 33-38, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436192

ABSTRACT

The study examined the clinical characteristics and outcomes of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infections among hospitalized patients. Design: Study design was a retrospective single-center review of hospital data. Setting: The study was conducted at the COVID-19 Treatment Center of the Department of Medicine and Therapeutics of the Korle-Bu Teaching hospital in Accra, Ghana. Participants and study tools: A total of fifty patients with laboratory (rRT-PCR) confirmed COVID-19 infection were involved in the study. A chart review of the medical records of the patients was conducted and the data obtained was documented using a data extraction form. Results: The median age was 53 years and most (36% (18/50)) of the patients were at least 60 years of age. Eighty percent (40/50) of the patients were symptomatic, with cough and difficulty in breathing being the commonest presenting symptoms. The mean duration of hospitalization was 12.3 ± 7.3 days. Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus were the commonest co-morbidities occurring in 52% (26/50) and 42% (21/50) of patients respectively. Fifty percent of patients developed COVID-19 pneumonia as a complication. The mortality rate was 12% (6/50). Conclusion: In this study, SARS-CoV2 infection affected older adults with hypertension and diabetes mellitus being the common comorbidities. Patients with these comorbid conditions should be counselled by their clinicians to strictly observe the COVID-19 prevention protocols to reduce their risk of acquiring the infection. There is a need to pay critical and prompt attention to the management of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia particularly among people with diabetes to improve outcomes. Funding: None declared.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Female , Ghana/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
17.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(8): 1059-1065, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405467

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Information on the clinical characteristics of local patients with confirmed COVID-19 is limited. This study aims to report the clinical characteristics of 147 patients admitted and receiving treatment at a teaching hospital. METHODOLOGY: Patients' socio-demographic and epidemiological data, clinical features, laboratory findings and clinical outcomes were extracted using a data sheet. RESULTS: The median patient age was 25 [interquartile range (IQR)] 20-44) years, and most of patients were male (68.7%) and of Malaysian nationality (88.4%). Almost half of the patients were from a case cluster related to a religious event (48.3%) and 12.9% had a history of overseas travel. A total of 33.3% of patients were not related to any case cluster, i.e. sporadic cases. Radiological investigation showed that 13.6% of the patients had chest X-ray changes and all laboratory parameters were within the normal ranges. Sixty-six patients (44.9%) experienced symptoms. The most common symptoms were rhinitis (66.7%), followed by fever (19.7%) and cough (15.2%). Age, gender, case cluster, comorbidity status, haemoglobin, albumin, total protein, bilirubin total and alkaline phosphatase level were associated with symptomatic status. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-centre study, COVID-19 infection led not only to case clusters, but also to sporadic infections, with patients being either symptomatic or asymptomatic. These sporadic cases and asymptomatic patients may hamper effective contact tracing, leading to rapid human-to-human transmission in our population. Future studies on the prevalence and clinical significance of asymptomatic and presymptomatic COVID-19 patients would pre-emptively address issues on further containment of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Comorbidity , Female , Fever/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Young Adult
18.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(8): e2121931, 2021 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377571

ABSTRACT

Importance: Significant differences in hesitancy to receive COVID-19 vaccination by race/ethnicity have been observed in several settings. Racial/ethnic differences in COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among health care workers (HCWs), who face occupational and community exposure to COVID-19, have not been well described. Objective: To assess hesitancy to COVID-19 vaccination among HCWs across different racial/ethnic groups and assess factors associated with vaccine hesitancy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study was conducted among HCWs from 2 large academic hospitals (ie, a children's hospital and an adult hospital) over a 3-week period in November and December 2020. Eligible participants were HCWs with and without direct patient contact. A 3-step hierarchical multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between race/ethnicity and vaccine hesitancy controlling for demographic characteristics, employment characteristics, COVID-19 exposure risk, and being up to date with routine vaccinations. Data were analyzed from February through March 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: Vaccine hesitancy, defined as not planning on, being unsure about, or planning to delay vaccination, served as the outcome. Results: Among 34 865 HCWs eligible for this study, 12 034 individuals (34.5%) completed the survey and 10 871 individuals (32.2%) completed the survey and reported their race/ethnicity. Among 10 866 of these HCWs with data on sex, 8362 individuals (76.9%) were women, and among 10 833 HCWs with age data, 5923 individuals (54.5%) were younger than age 40 years. (Percentages for demographic and clinical characteristics are among the number of respondents for each type of question.) There were 8388 White individuals (77.2%), 882 Black individuals (8.1%), 845 Asian individuals (7.8%), and 449 individuals with other or mixed race/ethnicity (4.1%), and there were 307 Hispanic or Latino individuals (2.8%). Vaccine hesitancy was highest among Black HCWs (732 individuals [83.0%]) and Hispanic or Latino HCWs (195 individuals [63.5%]) (P < .001). Among 5440 HCWs with vaccine hesitancy, reasons given for hesitancy included concerns about side effects (4737 individuals [87.1%]), newness of the vaccine (4306 individuals [79.2%]), and lack of vaccine knowledge (4091 individuals [75.2%]). The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for vaccine hesitancy was 4.98 (95% CI, 4.11-6.03) among Black HCWs, 2.10 (95% CI, 1.63-2.70) among Hispanic or Latino HCWs, 1.48 (95% CI, 1.21-1.82) among HCWs with other or mixed race/ethnicity, and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.26-1.71) among Asian HCWs compared with White HCWs (P < .001). The aOR was decreased among Black HCWs when adjusting for employment characteristics and COVID-19 exposure risk (aOR, 4.87; 95% CI, 3.96-6.00; P < .001) and being up to date with prior vaccines (aOR, 4.48; 95% CI, 3.62-5.53; P < .001) but not among HCWs with other racial/ethnic backgrounds. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that vaccine hesitancy before the authorization of the COVID-19 vaccine was increased among Black, Hispanic or Latino, and Asian HCWs compared with White HCWs. These findings suggest that interventions focused on addressing vaccine hesitancy among HCWs are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Teaching , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Adult , African Americans , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Motivation , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 134, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359429

ABSTRACT

Introduction: the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has challenged health systems around the world. This study was designed to describe the socio-demographic characteristics of pregnant women with COVID-19 infection, the common clinical features at presentation and the pregnancy outcome at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Edo State, Nigeria. Methods: a cross-sectional analytical study of all confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection from April to September 2020. Results: out of 69 suspected cases that were tested, 19 (28.4%) were confirmed with COVID-19 infection. The common presenting complaints were fever (68.4 %), cough (57.9 %), sore throat (31.6%), malaise (42.1%), loss of taste (26.3%), anosmia (21.1%), and difficulty with breathing (10.6%). In terms of treatment outcome, 57.9% delivered while 36.8% recovered with pregnancy on-going, and 1 (5.3%) maternal death. Of the 11 women who delivered, 45.4% had vaginal deliveries and 54.6 % had Caesarean section. The mean birth weight was 3.1kg and most of the neonates (81.8%) had normal Apgar scores at birth. There was 1 perinatal death from prematurity, birth asphyxia, and intrauterine growth restriction. The commonest diagnosed co-morbidity of pregnancy was preeclampsia and it was significantly associated with severe COVID-19 disease requiring oxygen supplementation (P = 0.028). Conclusion: the clinical symptoms of COVID-19 in pregnancy are similar to those described in the non-pregnant population. It did not seem to worsen the maternal or foetal pregnancy outcome. The occurrence of preeclampsia is significantly associated with severe COVID-19 infection requiring respiratory support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Maternal Death/statistics & numerical data , Nigeria , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Premature Birth/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
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