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2.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 26(1): 99, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448180

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this article, we aim to share our experience in the hospital reorganization made to conduct the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination campaign, based on the principles of flexibility and adaptability. STUDY DESIGN: A descriptive study. METHODS: The data concerning the organization of the vaccination campaign were taken from the operative protocol developed by the hospital dedicated task force, composed by experts in hygiene, public health, occupational medicine, pharmacists, nurses, hospital quality, and disaster managers. Data about the numbers of vaccine administered daily were collected by the Innovation and Development Operative Unit database. RESULTS: Vaccinations against COVID-19 started across the EU on the 27th of December 2020. The first phase of the vaccination campaign carried out in our hospital was directed to healthcare workers immunization including medical residents, social care operators, administrative staff and technicians, students of medicine, and health professions trainees. The second phase was enlarged to the coverage of extremely fragile subjects. Thanks to the massive employment of healthcare workers and the establishment of dynamic pathways, it was possible to achieve short turnaround times and a large number of doses administered daily, with peaks of 870 vaccines per day. From the 27th of December up to the 14th of March a total of 26,341 doses of Pfizer have been administered. 13,584 were first doses and 12,757 were second doses. From the 4th to the 14th of March, 296 first doses of Moderna were dispensed. It was necessary to implement adequate spaces and areas adopting anti-contagion safety measures: waiting area for subjects to be vaccinated, working rooms for the dilution of the vaccine and the storage of the material, vaccination rooms, post-vaccination observation areas, room for observation, and treatment of any adverse reactions, with an emergency cart available in each working area. CONCLUSIONS: The teaching hospital of Pisa faced the beginning of the immunization campaign readjusting its spaces, planning an adequate hospital vaccination area and providing an organization plan to ensure the achievement of the targets of the campaign. This represented a challenge due to limited vaccine doses supplied and the multisectoral teams of professionals to coordinate in the shortest time and the safest way possible. The organizational model adopted proved to be adequate and therefore exploited also for the second phase aimed to extremely fragile subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Humans , Italy/epidemiology
4.
Nurs Manag (Harrow) ; 28(5): 26-31, 2021 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280942

ABSTRACT

India reported its index case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in January 2020 and since then there has been an alarming rise in cases. In response to the worsening pandemic and the challenge presented by COVID-19 for hospitals in the public sector, the Government of India asked the country's private hospitals to reserve a percentage of their beds for COVID-19 patients. This article describes how nursing services at the Christian Medical College, Vellore - an unaided, not-for-profit quaternary care teaching hospital in Tamil Nadu, India - addressed various challenges to ensure a sustained, high-quality nursing care response to increased patient load. The main challenges included changing COVID-19 policies, ensuring the hospital was prepared to care for COVID-19 patients, and ensuring the availability of nurses. The article demonstrates how proactive planning, empowered involvement of nursing leaders and collaborative efforts resulted in deployment and training of 1,400 nurses, and ensured coordinated care for more than 10,000 patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Voluntary/organization & administration , Humans , India/epidemiology , Nursing Administration Research
8.
Postgrad Med J ; 97(1149): 417-422, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1088285

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 led to the widespread withdrawal of face-to-face hospital-based clinical placements, with many medical schools switching to online learning. This precipitated concern about potential negative impact on clinical and interprofessional skill acquisition. To overcome this problem, we piloted a 12-week COVID-19 safe face-to-face clinical placement for 16 medical students at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, London, during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 infection control measures necessitated that students remained in 'social bubbles' for placement duration. This facilitated an apprenticeship-style teaching approach, integrating students into the clinical team for placement duration. Team-based learning was adopted to develop and deliver content. Teaching comprised weekly seminars, experiential ward-based attachments and participation in quality improvement and research projects. The taught content was evaluated through qualitative feedback, reflective practice, and pre-apprenticeship and post-apprenticeship confidence questionnaires across 17 domains. Students' confidence improved in 14 of 17 domains (p<0.05). Reflective practice indicated that students valued the apprenticeship model, preferring the longer clinical attachment to existent shorter, fragmented clinical placements. Students described improved critical thinking, group cohesion, teamwork, self-confidence, self-worth and communication skills. This article describes a framework for the safe and effective delivery of a longer face-to-face apprenticeship-based clinical placement during an infectious disease pandemic. Longer apprenticeship-style attachments have hidden benefits to general professional training, which should be explored by medical schools both during the COVID-19 pandemic and, possibly, for any future clinical placements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Teaching , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Clerkship/methods , Clinical Clerkship/trends , Education, Distance , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/organization & administration , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Interprofessional Education , London , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Teaching/standards , Teaching/trends
9.
Soins ; 65(849): 18-21, 2020 Oct.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997628

ABSTRACT

The Legouest military training hospital is one of the eight hospitals of the armed forces health service. Situated in the Grand-Est region, one of the regions most affected by the COVID-19 epidemic in spring, it had to reorganise itself within a few days with its regional and national partners. While continuing to support forces sent abroad, to overseas territories or located in the East of France, the armed forces hospital had three major missions: the support of other military hospital facilities, the continued care of non-COVID patients and the care of patients affected by COVID-19 requiring non-intensive hospital care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitals, Military/organization & administration , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Pandemics , France , Humans , Military Personnel
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(20)2020 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983005

ABSTRACT

In Italy, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emergency took hold in Lombardy and Veneto at the end of February 2020 and spread unevenly among the other regions in the following weeks. In Tuscany, the progressive increase of hospitalized COVID-19 patients required the set-up of a regional task force to prepare for and effectively respond to the emergency. In this case report, we aim to describe the key elements that have been identified and implemented in our center, a 1082-bed hospital located in the Pisa district, to rapidly respond to the COVID-19 outbreak in order to guarantee safety of patients and healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
14.
Acta Biomed ; 91(3): e2020027, 2020 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761243

ABSTRACT

In order to continue the oncological surgical activity and the surgical emergencies, we have elaborated a reorganization of the surgical department. In particular, differentiated pathways for COVID-19 and NON-COVID-19 patients were promptly planned. This arrangement has involved structural and organizational changes almost daily, with great efforts of the health personnel, but allowing our hospital to be the only one in the area still able to guarantee patients safe access to surgical treatment.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergencies , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 43(4): 468-479, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729225

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic presented an unprecedented opportunity to test the emergency management plan of one large urban teaching hospital. In this article, a detailed description of the hospital's surge planning process with lessons learned has been provided.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Humans , Pennsylvania/epidemiology
16.
Am Surg ; 86(6): 611-614, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-655645

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus epidemic has taken the world by storm and has overwhelmed health systems in a number of first world countries. As a consequence, individual communities in the United States and the world have had to develop response plans to meet this extreme challenge. In these circumstances and in an effort to best prepare for the community's needs, it becomes necessary to critically analyze the specific and unique aspects of individual regions, their population characteristics and demographics, and the geography of the area. Once assessed, these data may be applied to formulating best practices for a given community and resource pool. The following manuscript describes how this challenge was met in a large tertiary care teaching hospital located in rural West Virginia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Pandemics , Rural Health , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Humans , Poverty , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative , West Virginia/epidemiology
17.
Elife ; 92020 06 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-607959

ABSTRACT

Previously, we showed that 3% (31/1032)of asymptomatic healthcare workers (HCWs) from a large teaching hospital in Cambridge, UK, tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in April 2020. About 15% (26/169) HCWs with symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (Rivett et al., 2020). Here, we show that the proportion of both asymptomatic and symptomatic HCWs testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 rapidly declined to near-zero between 25th April and 24th May 2020, corresponding to a decline in patient admissions with COVID-19 during the ongoing UK 'lockdown'. These data demonstrate how infection prevention and control measures including staff testing may help prevent hospitals from becoming independent 'hubs' of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, and illustrate how, with appropriate precautions, organizations in other sectors may be able to resume on-site work safely.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Personnel , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adult , Asymptomatic Diseases , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Community-Acquired Infections/transmission , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , England/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Female , Hospital Units , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Prevalence , Program Evaluation , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment
18.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 60(6): e73-e75, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-457306

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has affected over 3 million people worldwide with an estimated mortality rate of 5%. Owing to the diversity of training and the variety of positions within the pharmacy department, pharmacists are uniquely positioned in the hospital setting to play a pivotal role during the pandemic. The purpose of this article is to highlight the experiences and impactful interventions made by pharmacists practicing in a community teaching hospital at the center of the COVID-19 surge in New York City. Although often underrecognized, pharmacists are well-equipped to develop treatment plans based on the evolving literature that positively affect the patient outcomes by responding to inpatient emergencies, and optimizing the medication orders to conserve and maintain a healthy supply of medications for the hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Pharmacists/organization & administration , Professional Role , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Inpatients , New York City/epidemiology , Pharmacists/standards , SARS-CoV-2
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