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2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(25): e26433, 2021 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410303

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The subclinical severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection rate in hospitals during the pandemic remains unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness of our hospital's current nosocomial infection control measures, we conducted a serological survey of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (immunoglobulin [Ig] G) among the staff of our hospital, which is treating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients.The study design was cross-sectional. We measured anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG in the participants using a laboratory-based quantitative test (Abbott immunoassay), which has a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.6%, respectively. To investigate the factors associated with seropositivity, we also obtained some information from the participants with an anonymous questionnaire. We invited 1133 staff members in our hospital, and 925 (82%) participated. The mean age of the participants was 40.0 ±â€Š11.8 years, and most were women (80.0%). According to job title, there were 149 medical doctors or dentists (16.0%), 489 nurses (52.9%), 140 medical technologists (14.2%), 49 healthcare providers (5.3%), and 98 administrative staff (10.5%). The overall prevalence of seropositivity for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG was 0.43% (4/925), which was similar to the control seroprevalence of 0.54% (16/2970) in the general population in Osaka during the same period according to a government survey conducted with the same assay. Seropositive rates did not significantly differ according to job title, exposure to suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients, or any other investigated factors.The subclinical SARS-CoV-2 infection rate in our hospital was not higher than that in the general population under our nosocomial infection control measures.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/standards , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data
3.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 77(19): 1598-1605, 2020 09 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317904

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe our medical center's pharmacy services preparedness process and offer guidance to assist other institutions in preparing for surges of critically ill patients such as those experienced during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. SUMMARY: The leadership of a department of pharmacy at an urban medical center in the US epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic proactively created a pharmacy action plan in anticipation of a surge in admissions of critically ill patients with COVID-19. It was essential to create guidance documents outlining workflow, provide comprehensive staff education, and repurpose non-intensive care unit (ICU)-trained clinical pharmacotherapy specialists to work in ICUs. Teamwork was crucial to ensure staff safety, develop complete scheduling, maintain adequate drug inventory and sterile compounding, optimize the electronic health record and automated dispensing cabinets to help ensure appropriate prescribing and effective management of medication supplies, and streamline the pharmacy workflow to ensure that all patients received pharmacotherapeutic regimens in a timely fashion. CONCLUSION: Each hospital should view the COVID-19 crisis as an opportunity to internally review and enhance workflow processes, initiatives that can continue even after the resolution of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Medication Therapy Management/organization & administration , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/standards , Humans , Leadership , New York/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/standards , Pharmacists/organization & administration , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/standards , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/standards , Workflow , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
4.
Anesth Analg ; 132(5): 1182-1190, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged as a public health crisis that disrupted normal patterns of health care in the New York City metropolitan area. In preparation for a large influx of critically ill patients, operating rooms (ORs) at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center (NYP-Columbia) were converted into a novel intensive care unit (ICU) area, the operating room intensive care unit (ORICU). METHODS: Twenty-three ORs were converted into an 82-bed ORICU. Adaptations to the OR environment permitted the delivery of standard critical care therapies. Nonintensive-care-trained staff were educated on the basics of critical care and deployed in a hybrid staffing model. Anesthesia machines were repurposed as critical care ventilators, with accommodations to ensure reliable function and patient safety. To compare ORICU survivorship to outcomes in more traditional environments, we performed Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of all patients cared for in the ORICU, censoring data at the time of ORICU closure. We hypothesized that age, sex, and obesity may have influenced the risk of death. Thus, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) for death using Cox proportional hazard regression models with age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) as covariables and, separately, using older age (65 years and older) adjusted for sex and BMI. RESULTS: The ORICU cared for 133 patients from March 24 to May 14, 2020. Patients were transferred to the ORICU from other ICUs, inpatient wards, the emergency department, and other institutions. Patients remained in the ORICU until either transfer to another unit or death. As the hospital patient load decreased, patients were transferred out of the ORICU. This process was completed on May 14, 2020. At time of data censoring, 55 (41.4%) of patients had died. The estimated probability of survival 30 days after admission was 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.69). Age was significantly associated with increased risk of mortality (HR = 1.05, 95% CI, 1.03-1.08, P < .001 for a 1-year increase in age). Patients who were ≥65 years were an estimated 3.17 times more likely to die than younger patients (95% CI, 1.78-5.63; P < .001) when adjusting for sex and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: A large number of critically ill COVID-19 patients were cared for in the ORICU, which substantially increased ICU capacity at NYP-Columbia. The estimated ORICU survival rate at 30 days was comparable to other reported rates, suggesting this was an effective approach to manage the influx of critically ill COVID-19 patients during a time of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitals, Urban/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Operating Rooms/trends , Organization and Administration , Survival Rate/trends , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Healthc Qual Res ; 36(3): 136-141, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1137459

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, elective surgical activity was reduced to a minimum. As both the number of cases and the hospitalization needs for this pathology decreased, we thought it appropriate to progressively recover scheduled surgical activity. This work describes how, even with the current alarm state, we were able to practically normalize this activity in a few weeks. METHODS: Two weeks before the intervention, the patients included in the waiting lists were contacted by telephone. After checking their health status and expressing their desire to undergo surgery, they were provided with recommendations to decrease the risk of coronavirus infection. Likewise, an exclusive circuit was established to carry out, 48 hours before the intervention, the detection of SARS-CoV-2 by means of exudates nasopharyngeal PCR. The results were evaluated by each surgical service and the anesthesiology service. In addition, asymptomatic Surgical Area professionals could undergo weekly screening for the early detection of coronavirus according to the recommendations of Occupational Health. RESULTS: In the midst of a pandemic, scheduled surgical activity was reduced by 85%. From the week of April 13, the operating rooms available were recovered, which allowed practically all surgical activity to be recovered the week of May 25. CONCLUSIONS: The creation of circuits and procedures to streamline surgical activity, still in full force of the state of alarm, has allowed us, in a few weeks, to recover almost all of it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Elective Surgical Procedures , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Anesthesiology/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Mass Screening , Nasopharynx/virology , Operating Rooms/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spain , Time-to-Treatment , Waiting Lists
6.
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand ; 65(6): 755-760, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1096648

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial wave of the Covid-19 pandemic has hit Italy, and Lombardy in particular, with violence, forcing to reshape all hospitals' activities; this happened even in pediatric hospitals, although the young population seemed initially spared from the disease. "Vittore Buzzi" Children's Hospital, which is a pediatric/maternal hospital located in Milan (Lombardy Region), had to stop elective procedures-with the exception of urgent/emergent ones-between February and May 2020 to leave space and resources to adults' care. We describe the challenges of reshaping the hospital's identity and structure, and restarting pediatric surgery and anesthesia, from May on, in the most hit area of the world, with the purpose to avoid and contain infections. Both patients and caregivers admitted to hospital have been tested for Sars-CoV-2 in every case. METHODS: Observational cohort study via review of clinical charts of patients undergoing surgery between 16th May and 30th September 2020, together with SARS-CoV -2 RT-PCR testing outcomes, and comparison to same period surgeries in 2019. RESULTS: An increase of approximately 70% in pediatric surgeries (OR 1.68 [1.33-2.13], P < .001) and a higher increase in the number of surgeries were reported (OR 1.75 (1.43-2.15), P < .001). Considering only urgent procedures, a significant difference in the distribution of the type of surgery was observed (Chi-squared P-value < .001). Sars-CoV-2-positive patients have been 0.8% of total number; 14% of these was discovered through caregiver's positivity. CONCLUSION: We describe our pathway for safe pediatric surgery and anesthesia and the importance of testing both patient and caregiver.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric/organization & administration , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Caregivers , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Diagnosis-Related Groups , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergencies/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Patients , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Symptom Assessment , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
7.
Emerg Med J ; 38(4): 308-314, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081663

ABSTRACT

Emilia-Romagna was one of the most affected Italian regions during the COVID-19 outbreak in February 2020. We describe here the profound regional, provincial and municipal changes in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, to cope with the numbers of patients presenting with COVID-19 illness, as well as coping with the ongoing need to care for patients presenting with non-COVID-19 emergencies. We focus on the structural and functional changes in one particular hospital within the city of Bologna, the regional capital, which acted as the central emergency hub for time-sensitive pathologies for the province of Bologna. Finally, we present the admissions profile to our emergency department in relation to the massive increase of infected patients observed in our region as well as the organisational response to prepare for the second wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Air Ambulances , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Hospital Restructuring , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment
9.
Qual Manag Health Care ; 30(1): 61-68, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003858

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak and to ensure the safety of epidemic prevention in the hospital, the hospital has established mitigation strategies in advance including risk assessment and effect analysis to control hospital visitors and accompanying persons. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of mitigation strategies implemented to effectively prevent the invasion and spread of the virus. METHOD: Conduct a status analysis in accordance with the Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (HFMEA) 4-step model, construct a response workflow, confirm the failure mode and potential causes, perform hazard matrix analysis and decision tree analysis, and formulate risk control management measures. RESULTS: For the 4 main processes and 9 subprocesses of the accompanying carers and contract caregivers entering the hospital, 26 potential failure modes and 42 potential causes of failure were analyzed. Following implementing improvement measures including strategies targeting the accompanying person, mitigation workflow failure rates decreased from 42 to 13 items, the pass rate for the maximum body temperature cutoff increased from 53.1% to 90.8%, and the compliance rate of hand washing increased from 89.5% to 100%. CONCLUSION: The HFMEA model can effectively implement preventive risk assessment and workflow management of high-risk medical procedures. The model can adjudicate the health of hospital visitors during the epidemic/pandemic, provide epidemic/pandemic education training and preventive measure health education guidance for hospital visits, and improve their epidemic prevention cognition. When combined, these strategies can prevent nosocomial infection to achieve the best anti-epidemic effect.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis , Visitors to Patients , COVID-19/transmission , Caregivers , Cross Infection/transmission , Hand Disinfection , Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis/methods , Healthcare Failure Mode and Effect Analysis/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Models, Organizational , Organizational Policy , Risk Assessment , Taiwan/epidemiology
10.
Am Surg ; 86(12): 1629-1635, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The role of an acute care surgery (ACS) service during the COVID-19 pandemic is not well established. METHODS: A retrospective review of the ACS service performance in an urban tertiary academic medical center. The study was performed between January and May 2020. The demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients treated by the ACS service 2 months prior to the COVID surge (pre-COVID group) and during the first 2 months of the COVID-19 pandemic (surge group) were compared. RESULTS: Trauma and emergency general surgery volumes decreased during the surge by 38% and 57%, respectively; but there was a 64% increase in critically ill patients. The proportion of patients in the Department of Surgery treated by the ACS service increased from 40% pre-COVID to 67% during the surge. The ACS service performed 32% and 57% of all surgical cases in the Department of Surgery during the pre-COVID and surge periods, respectively. The ACS service managed 23% of all critically ill patients in the institution during the surge. Critically ill patients with and without confirmed COVID-19 infection treated by ACS and non-ACS intensive care units during the surge did not differ in demographics, indicators of clinical severity, or hospital mortality:13.4% vs. 13.5% (P = .99) for all critically ill patients; and 13.9% vs. 27.4% (P = .12) for COVID-19 critically ill patients. CONCLUSION: Acute care surgery is an "essential" service during the COVID-19 pandemic, capable of managing critically ill nonsurgical patients while maintaining the provision of trauma and emergent surgical services. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III. STUDY TYPE: Therapeutic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
12.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 42(6): 743-745, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-882836

ABSTRACT

Strategies for pandemic preparedness and response are urgently needed for all settings. We describe our experience using inverted classroom methodology (ICM) for COVID-19 pandemic preparedness in a small hospital with limited infection prevention staff. ICM for pandemic preparedness was feasible and contributed to an increase in COVID-19 knowledge and comfort.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Personnel, Hospital/education , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Feasibility Studies , Hospital Bed Capacity , Humans , Teaching/organization & administration
13.
Am J Nephrol ; 51(10): 786-796, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although diffuse alveolar damage and respiratory failure are the key features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the involvement of other organs such as the kidney has also been reported. The reports of the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in COVID-19 patients vary widely. In this study, we report our unique experience with AKI in COVID-19 patients in a low socioeconomic and predominantly ethnic minority group and provide its incidence, risk factors, and prognosis to expand the current understanding of this complication. METHODS: In this single-center, retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the data of 469 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Brookdale University Hospital in Brooklyn, NY, from March 18 through April 23, 2020. Information regarding demographics, comorbidities, medications, clinical and laboratory data, and outcomes was collected from the electronic medical records. Both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the association of AKI with in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The median age was 66 years (interquartile range [IQR] 25-75; range 19-101 years), and 268 (57.14%) patients were male. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) as determined by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study Equation was low (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in 207 (44.1%) patients. During hospitalization, 128 (27.3%) patients developed AKI, and the incidence was significantly higher in those patients presenting with a low eGFR (N = 81, 39.1%; p < 0.001). Male sex, hypertension, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, hemodynamic instability, mechanical ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and admission elevated ferritin, creatinine kinase, brain natriuretic peptide, and troponin 1 were identified as the risk factors for in-hospital AKI. Ninety-seven (28.45%) patients died in the non-AKI group versus 91 (71.1%) in the AKI group (p < 0.001). The Cox proportional hazard model after adjusting for age, gender, comorbidities, hemodynamic status, and PF ratio (arterial oxygen partial pressure [PaO2]/fractional inspired oxygen [FiO2]) determined that on admission, an elevated blood urea nitrogen (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-2.48), a low eGFR (HR 1.43; CI 1.1-2.03), AKI stage 1 (HR 1.14; CI 0.64-2.03), AKI stage 2 (HR 1.86; CI 1.03-3.56), and AKI stage 3 (HR 2.1; CI 1.3-2.81) were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) did not improve survival in stage III AKI. CONCLUSION: AKI in our hospitalized COVID-19 patients was common and carried a high mortality, especially in patients with AKI stage 3. RRT did not improve survival. Policy changes and planning for this high incidence of AKI in COVID-19 patients and its associated high mortality are necessary at the local and national levels.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Policy , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
14.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 43(4): 468-479, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729225

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic presented an unprecedented opportunity to test the emergency management plan of one large urban teaching hospital. In this article, a detailed description of the hospital's surge planning process with lessons learned has been provided.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Humans , Pennsylvania/epidemiology
16.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 35(6): 363-371, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612930

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The overload of the healthcare system and the organisational changes made in response to the COVID-19 pandemic may be having an impact on acute stroke care in the Region of Madrid. METHODS: We conducted a survey with sections addressing hospital characteristics, changes in infrastructure and resources, code stroke clinical pathways, diagnostic testing, rehabilitation, and outpatient care. We performed a descriptive analysis of results according to the level of complexity of stroke care (availability of stroke units and mechanical thrombectomy). RESULTS: The survey was completed by 22 of the 26 hospitals in the Madrid Regional Health System that attend adult emergencies, between 16 and 27 April 2020. Ninety-five percent of hospitals had reallocated neurologists to care for patients with COVID-19. The numbers of neurology ward beds were reduced in 89.4% of hospitals; emergency department stroke care pathways were modified in 81%, with specific pathways for suspected SARS-CoV2 infection established in 50% of hospitals; and SARS-CoV2-positive patients with acute stroke were not admitted to neurology wards in 42%. Twenty-four hour on-site availability of mechanical thrombectomy was improved in 10 hospitals, which resulted in a reduction in the number of secondary hospital transfers. The admission of patients with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke was avoided in 45% of hospitals, and follow-up through telephone consultations was implemented in 100%. CONCLUSIONS: The organisational changes made in response to the SARS-Co2 pandemic in hospitals in the Region of Madrid have modified the allocation of neurology department staff and infrastructure, stroke units and stroke care pathways, diagnostic testing, hospital admissions, and outpatient follow-up.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke Rehabilitation , Stroke/therapy , Acute Disease , Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Appointments and Schedules , Bed Conversion , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Ischemic Attack, Transient/therapy , Mechanical Thrombolysis/statistics & numerical data , Neurology/organization & administration , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine , Thrombolytic Therapy/statistics & numerical data
17.
Farm Hosp ; 44(7): 11-16, 2020 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599571

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to report the experience of the Department of Hospital Pharmacy of a mid-size hospital during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The human and material resources available in a mid-size hospital were more limited than in larger hospitals of the region. In this article, we describe how this Department of Hospital Pharmacy was reorganized to meet the increase in activity, the strategies developed and the  lessons learned for future pandemics. The COVID-19 pandemic had a higher  impact in Leganes, a city in the south of Madrid, with a population of 190,000.  In the face of the dramatic increase in the proportion of patients attending our  hospital between March and April 2020, the Severo Ochoa University Hospital  increased the number of beds by 24.5% and fitted out new premises inside and  outside the hospital (sports centers). The mean number of patients seen in our  Emergency Department every day passed from 70-80 to a peak of 286 patients, with 652 hospitalized patients. The situation of emergency created by  this infectious disease, with management protocols changing constantly, had a  dramatic impact on the activity of hospital pharmacies. Thus, the pandemic has  affected areas of economic management, magistral preparation, dispensing of  medication to inpatients, ambulatory patients, patients monitored at home,  institutionalized patients, and patients from private hospitals and field hospitals.  Other areas affected include training, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, and  counseling boards. Two strategies were adopted to overcome these problems: a  strategy centered on human resources (staff reinforcement, reallocation of  responsibilities), and a strategy centered on processes (some processes were  reinforced to meet the increase in activity, whereas other were temporarily suspended or reduced to the minimum).Conclusions: The Department of Hospital Pharmacy plays a key role  in hospitals and has been significantly reinforced to meet the dramatic impact of  the pandemic on this service. This Department has been able to reorganize its  processes and take over new responsibilities such as telepharmacy and home  dispensing. Hospital pharmacies play a crucial role in  pharmacotherapeutic decisions in hospitals. As in other Departments, training is  the area more significantly affected by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Disaster Planning , Drug Compounding , Drug Prescriptions/statistics & numerical data , Forecasting , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hospital Bed Capacity , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Medication Systems, Hospital/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Staff Development
18.
Farm Hosp ; 44(7): 57-60, 2020 06 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-595560

ABSTRACT

On the 20th of March 2020, triggered by the public health emergency declared,  the Health Authorities in Madrid reported a legal instruction (Orden 371/2020)  indicating the organization of a provisional hospital to admit patients with  COVID-19 at the Trade Fair Institution (IFEMA). Several pharmacists working in  the Pharmacy and Medical Devices Department of the Madrid Regional Health  Service were called to manage the Pharmacy Department of the  abovementioned hospital. Required permissions to set up a PD were here  authorized urgently. Tackling human and material resources, and computer  systems for drug purchase and electronic prescription, were some of the initial  issues that hindered the pharmaceutical provision required for patients from the  very day one. Once the purchase was assured, mainly by direct purchase from suppliers, drug dispensing up to 1,250 hospitalized patients (25 nursing units) and 8 ICU patients was taken on. Dispensing was carried out  through either drug stocks in the nursing units or individual patient dispensing  for certain drugs. Moreover, safety issues related to prescription were  considered, and as the electronic prescription was implemented we attained  100% prescriptions review and validation. The constitution of a multidisciplinary  Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee let agree to a pharmacotherapy guide,  pres cription protocols, therapeutic equivalences, interactions, and drug  dispensing circuits. The Pharmacy Department strategy was to ensure a very  quick response to basic tasks keeping the aim to offer a pharmaceutical care of  the highest quality whenever possible. Working under a health emergency  situation, with many uncertainties and continuous pressure was a plight.  However, the spirit of collaboration in and out of the Pharmacy Department was  aligned with the whole hospital motivation to offer the highest quality of  healthcare. These were possibly the keys to allow caring for almost 4,000  patients during the 42 days that the hospital lasted.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Electronic Prescribing/standards , Facility Regulation and Control/legislation & jurisprudence , Forecasting , Health Facility Planning , Health Services Needs and Demand , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Urban/legislation & jurisprudence , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Patient Safety , Pharmacy Service, Hospital/legislation & jurisprudence , Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee/organization & administration , Quality Assurance, Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
19.
Stroke ; 51(7): 1991-1995, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of the study is to analyze how the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected acute stroke care in a Comprehensive Stroke Center. METHODS: On February 28, 2020, contingency plans were implemented at Hospital Clinic of Barcelona to contain the COVID-19 pandemic. Among them, the decision to refrain from reallocating the Stroke Team and Stroke Unit to the care of patients with COVID-19. From March 1 to March 31, 2020, we measured the number of emergency calls to the Emergency Medical System in Catalonia (7.5 million inhabitants), and the Stroke Codes dispatched to Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. We recorded all stroke admissions, and the adequacy of acute care measures, including the number of thrombectomies, workflow metrics, angiographic results, and clinical outcomes. Data were compared with March 2019 using parametric or nonparametric methods as appropriate. RESULTS: At Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, 1232 patients with COVID-19 were admitted in March 2020, demanding 60% of the hospital bed capacity. Relative to March 2019, the Emergency Medical System had a 330% mean increment in the number of calls (158 005 versus 679 569), but fewer Stroke Code activations (517 versus 426). Stroke admissions (108 versus 83) and the number of thrombectomies (21 versus 16) declined at Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, particularly after lockdown of the population. Younger age was found in stroke admissions during the pandemic (median [interquartile range] 69 [64-73] versus 75 [73-80] years, P=0.009). In-hospital, there were no differences in workflow metrics, angiographic results, complications, or outcomes at discharge. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic reduced by a quarter the stroke admissions and thrombectomies performed at a Comprehensive Stroke Center but did not affect the quality of care metrics. During the lockdown, there was an overload of emergency calls but fewer Stroke Code activations, particularly in elderly patients. Hospital contingency plans, patient transport systems, and population-targeted alerts must act concertedly to better protect the chain of stroke care in times of pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Hospitals, Special/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke/therapy , Acute Disease , Age Distribution , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Special/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Urban/standards , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Neuroimaging/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Resource Allocation , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome
20.
J Perinat Med ; 48(5): 453-461, 2020 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324264

ABSTRACT

The rapid progression of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak presented extraordinary challenges to the US health care system, particularly straining resources in hard hit areas such as the New York metropolitan region. As a result, major changes in the delivery of obstetrical care were urgently needed, while maintaining patient safety on our maternity units. As the largest health system in the region, with 10 hospitals providing obstetrical services, and delivering over 30,000 babies annually, we needed to respond to this crisis in an organized, deliberate fashion. Our hospital footprint for Obstetrics was dramatically reduced to make room for the rapidly increasing numbers of COVID-19 patients, and established guidelines were quickly modified to reduce potential staff and patient exposures. New communication strategies were developed to facilitate maternity care across our hospitals, with significantly limited resources in personnel, equipment, and space. The lessons learned from these unexpected challenges offered an opportunity to reassess the delivery of obstetrical care without compromising quality and safety. These lessons may well prove valuable after the peak of the crisis has passed.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Delivery, Obstetric , Female , Humans , New York , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Urban Health , Urban Health Services/organization & administration
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