Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 75
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 17(12): e1009664, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571973

ABSTRACT

The evolution of circulating viruses is shaped by their need to evade antibody response, which mainly targets the viral spike. Because of the high density of spikes on the viral surface, not all antigenic sites are targeted equally by antibodies. We offer here a geometry-based approach to predict and rank the probability of surface residues of SARS spike (S protein) and influenza H1N1 spike (hemagglutinin) to acquire antibody-escaping mutations utilizing in-silico models of viral structure. We used coarse-grained MD simulations to estimate the on-rate (targeting) of an antibody model to surface residues of the spike protein. Analyzing publicly available sequences, we found that spike surface sequence diversity of the pre-pandemic seasonal influenza H1N1 and the sarbecovirus subgenus highly correlates with our model prediction of antibody targeting. In particular, we identified an antibody-targeting gradient, which matches a mutability gradient along the main axis of the spike. This identifies the role of viral surface geometry in shaping the evolution of circulating viruses. For the 2009 H1N1 and SARS-CoV-2 pandemics, a mutability gradient along the main axis of the spike was not observed. Our model further allowed us to identify key residues of the SARS-CoV-2 spike at which antibody escape mutations have now occurred. Therefore, it can inform of the likely functional role of observed mutations and predict at which residues antibody-escaping mutation might arise.


Subject(s)
Evolution, Molecular , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , Antigens, Viral/chemistry , Antigens, Viral/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/chemistry , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/genetics , Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/virology , Models, Immunological , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Mutation , Pandemics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Viral Envelope Proteins/chemistry
2.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(6): 2348-2359, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526356

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) viral infection, which can lead to pneumonia, lung injury, and death in susceptible populations. Understanding viral dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 is critical for development of effective treatments. An Immune-Viral Dynamics Model (IVDM) is developed to describe SARS-CoV-2 viral dynamics and COVID-19 disease progression. A dataset of 60 individual patients with COVID-19 with clinical viral load (VL) and reported disease severity were assembled from literature. Viral infection and replication mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2, viral-induced cell death, and time-dependent immune response are incorporated in the model to describe the dynamics of viruses and immune response. Disease severity are tested as a covariate to model parameters. The IVDM was fitted to the data and parameters were estimated using the nonlinear mixed-effect model. The model can adequately describe individual viral dynamics profiles, with disease severity identified as a covariate on infected cell death rate. The modeling suggested that it takes about 32.6 days to reach 50% of maximum cell-based immunity. Simulations based on virtual populations suggested a typical mild case reaches VL limit of detection (LOD) by 13 days with no treatment, a moderate case by 17 days, and a severe case by 41 days. Simulations were used to explore hypothetical treatments with different initiation time, disease severity, and drug effects to demonstrate the usefulness of such modeling in informing decisions. Overall, the IVDM modeling and simulation platform enables simulations for viral dynamics and treatment efficacy and can be used to aid in clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) and dose-efficacy response analysis for COVID-19 drug development.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Development/methods , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Models, Biological , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Death/drug effects , Cell Death/immunology , Datasets as Topic , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Nonlinear Dynamics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Viral Load
3.
J Clin Invest ; 131(21)2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495789

ABSTRACT

To explore how the immune system controls clearance of SARS-CoV-2, we used a single-cell, mass cytometry-based proteomics platform to profile the immune systems of 21 patients who had recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection without need for admission to an intensive care unit or for mechanical ventilation. We focused on receptors involved in interactions between immune cells and virus-infected cells. We found that the diversity of receptor repertoires on natural killer (NK) cells was negatively correlated with the viral clearance rate. In addition, NK subsets expressing the receptor DNAM1 were increased in patients who more rapidly recovered from infection. Ex vivo functional studies revealed that NK subpopulations with high DNAM1 expression had cytolytic activities in response to target cell stimulation. We also found that SARS-CoV-2 infection induced the expression of CD155 and nectin-4, ligands of DNAM1 and its paired coinhibitory receptor TIGIT, which counterbalanced the cytolytic activities of NK cells. Collectively, our results link the cytolytic immune responses of NK cells to the clearance of SARS-CoV-2 and show that the DNAM1 pathway modulates host-pathogen interactions during SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Receptors, Natural Killer Cell/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Animals , Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Cell Adhesion Molecules/immunology , Cohort Studies , Cytotoxicity, Immunologic , Female , Heterografts , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunophenotyping , In Vitro Techniques , Ligands , Male , Mice , Mice, SCID , Middle Aged , NK Cell Lectin-Like Receptor Subfamily D/immunology , Pandemics , Receptors, Immunologic/immunology , Receptors, Virus/immunology , Viral Load , Young Adult
4.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 387-396, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483190

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulability and vascular injury, which characterize morbidity in COVID-19 disease, are frequently observed in the skin. Several pathomechanisms, such as inflammation caused by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-mediated uptake into endothelial cells or SARS-CoV-2-initiated host immune responses, contribute to microthrombus formation and the appearance of vascular skin lesions. Besides pathophysiologic mechanisms observed in the skin, this review describes the clinical appearance of cutaneous vascular lesions and their association with COVID-19 disease, including acro-ischemia, reticular lesions, and cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. Clinicians need to be aware that skin manifestations may be the only symptom in SARS-CoV-2 infection, and that inflammatory and thrombotic SARS-CoV-2-driven processes observed in multiple organs and tissues appear identically in the skin as well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin/blood supply , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/blood , Blood Coagulation Disorders/etiology , Blood Coagulation Disorders/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Complement Activation , Cytokines/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Microvessels/immunology , Microvessels/pathology , Microvessels/physiopathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Skin/immunology , Vasculitis/etiology , Vasculitis/pathology , Vasculitis/physiopathology , Virus Internalization
5.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 372-378, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483189

ABSTRACT

Since the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic spread unrelentingly all over the world, millions of cases have been reported. Despite a high number of asymptomatic cases, the course of the disease can be serious or even fatal. The affection of the myocardium, called myocardial injury, is caused by multiple triggers. The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients with myocardial involvement and a critical course is common. In this review, potential mechanisms, incidence, and treatment options for cardiac arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients will be provided by performing a literature research in MESH database and the National Library of Medicine. Common cardiac arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients were sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation (AF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), atrioventricular block, sinusoidal block or QTc prolongation. AF was the most common heart rhythm disorder. About 10% of COVID-19 patients develop new-onset AF and 23 to 33% showed recurrence of AF in patients with known AF. One retrospective trial revealed the incidence of VT or VF to be 5.9% in hospitalized patients. Both AF and VT are clearly associated with worse outcome. Several mechanisms such as hypoxia, myocarditis, myocardial ischemia, or abnormal host immune response, which induce cardiac arrhythmias, have been described. The effect of QT-prolonging drugs in inducing cardiac arrhythmias has become mitigated as these medications are no longer recommended. Acute management of cardiac arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients is affected by the reduction of exposure of health care personnel. More prospective data are desirable to better understand pathophysiology and consecutively adapt management.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/etiology , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/physiopathology , Atrial Fibrillation/etiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Myocardial Ischemia/etiology , Myocarditis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tachycardia, Ventricular/etiology , Water-Electrolyte Imbalance/etiology
6.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 379-385, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483188

ABSTRACT

In 2019 first reports about a new human coronavirus emerged, which causes common cold symptoms as well as acute respiratory distress syndrome. The virus was identified as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and severe thrombotic events including deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and microthrombi emerged as additional symptoms. Heart failure, myocardial infarction, myocarditis, and stroke have also been observed. As main mediator of thrombus formation, platelets became one of the key aspects in SARS-CoV-2 research. Platelets may also directly interact with SARS-CoV-2 and have been shown to carry the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Platelets can also facilitate the virus uptake by secretion of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase furin. Cleavage of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein by furin enhances binding capabilities and virus entry into various cell types. In COVID-19 patients, platelet count differs between mild and serious infections. Patients with mild symptoms have a slightly increased platelet count, whereas thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of severe COVID-19 infections. Low platelet count can be attributed to platelet apoptosis and the incorporation of platelets into microthrombi (peripheral consumption) and severe thrombotic events. The observed excessive formation of thrombi is due to hyperactivation of platelets caused by the infection. Various factors have been suggested in the activation of platelets in COVID-19, such as hypoxia, vessel damage, inflammatory factors, NETosis, SARS-CoV-2 interaction, autoimmune reactions, and autocrine activation. COVID-19 does alter chemokine and cytokine plasma concentrations. Platelet chemokine profiles are altered in COVID-19 and contribute to the described chemokine storms observed in severely ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/blood , Blood Platelets/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Chemokines/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , Humans , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Platelet Activation/immunology , Platelet Activation/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
7.
Eur J Immunol ; 51(7): 1641-1651, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1473829

ABSTRACT

Emerging life-threatening viruses have posed great challenges to public health. It is now increasingly clear that epigenetics plays a role in shaping host-virus interactions and there is a great need for a more thorough understanding of these intricate interactions through the epigenetic lens, which may represent potential therapeutic opportunities in the clinic. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the roles of key epigenetic regulators - chromatin remodeling and histone modification - in modulating chromatin openness during host defense against virus. We also discuss how the RNA modification m6A (N6-methyladenosine) affects fundamental aspects of host-virus interactions. We conclude with future directions for uncovering more detailed functions that epigenetic regulation exerts on both host cells and viruses during infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Epigenesis, Genetic/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic/immunology , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Animals , Chromatin/genetics , Chromatin/immunology , Histones/genetics , Histones/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/genetics , RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional/immunology
8.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(10): e10387, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478718

ABSTRACT

We need to effectively combine the knowledge from surging literature with complex datasets to propose mechanistic models of SARS-CoV-2 infection, improving data interpretation and predicting key targets of intervention. Here, we describe a large-scale community effort to build an open access, interoperable and computable repository of COVID-19 molecular mechanisms. The COVID-19 Disease Map (C19DMap) is a graphical, interactive representation of disease-relevant molecular mechanisms linking many knowledge sources. Notably, it is a computational resource for graph-based analyses and disease modelling. To this end, we established a framework of tools, platforms and guidelines necessary for a multifaceted community of biocurators, domain experts, bioinformaticians and computational biologists. The diagrams of the C19DMap, curated from the literature, are integrated with relevant interaction and text mining databases. We demonstrate the application of network analysis and modelling approaches by concrete examples to highlight new testable hypotheses. This framework helps to find signatures of SARS-CoV-2 predisposition, treatment response or prioritisation of drug candidates. Such an approach may help deal with new waves of COVID-19 or similar pandemics in the long-term perspective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Factual , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Software , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Computer Graphics , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Gene Expression Regulation , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lymphocytes/drug effects , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/virology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/immunology , Myeloid Cells/drug effects , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/virology , Protein Interaction Mapping , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factors/genetics , Transcription Factors/immunology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/immunology
9.
J Clin Invest ; 131(21)2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403157

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Little is known about the interplay between preexisting immunity to endemic seasonal coronaviruses and the development of a SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG response. We investigated the kinetics, breadth, magnitude, and level of cross-reactivity of IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and heterologous seasonal and epidemic coronaviruses at the clonal level in patients with mild or severe COVID-19 as well as in disease control patients. We assessed antibody reactivity to nucleocapsid and spike antigens and correlated this IgG response to SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. Patients with COVID-19 mounted a mostly type-specific SARS-CoV-2 response. Additionally, IgG clones directed against a seasonal coronavirus were boosted in patients with severe COVID-19. These boosted clones showed limited cross-reactivity and did not neutralize SARS-CoV-2. These findings indicate a boost of poorly protective CoV-specific antibodies in patients with COVID-19 that correlated with disease severity, revealing "original antigenic sin."


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Specificity , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Cross Reactions , Female , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Seasons , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 700184, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365542

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has high incidence rates with rapid rate of transmission, is a pandemic that spread across the world, resulting in more than 3,000,000 deaths globally. Currently, several drugs have been used for the clinical treatment of COVID-19, such as antivirals (radecivir, baritinib), monoclonal antibodies (tocilizumab), and glucocorticoids (dexamethasone). Accumulating evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are essential regulators of virus infections and antiviral immune responses including biological processes that are involved in the regulation of COVID-19 and subsequent disease states. Upon viral infections, cellular lncRNAs directly regulate viral genes and influence viral replication and pathology through virus-mediated changes in the host transcriptome. Additionally, several host lncRNAs could help the occurrence of viral immune escape by inhibiting type I interferons (IFN-1), while others could up-regulate IFN-1 production to play an antiviral role. Consequently, understanding the expression and function of lncRNAs during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection will provide insights into the development of lncRNA-based methods. In this review, we summarized the current findings of lncRNAs in the regulation of the strong inflammatory response, immune dysfunction and thrombosis induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection, discussed the underlying mechanisms, and highlighted the therapeutic challenges of COVID-19 treatment and its future research directions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Immunity, Innate/genetics , RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism , Thrombosis/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/drug effects , Gene Expression Regulation, Viral/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Pandemics/prevention & control , RNA, Long Noncoding/analysis , RNA, Long Noncoding/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/genetics , Signal Transduction/immunology , Thrombosis/genetics , Thrombosis/virology , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/immunology
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(9)2021 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359279

ABSTRACT

Deeply understanding the virus-host interaction is a prerequisite for developing effective anti-viral strategies. Traditionally, the transporter associated with antigen processing type 1 (TAP1) is critical for antigen presentation to regulate adaptive immunity. However, its role in controlling viral infections through modulating innate immune signaling is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we reported that TAP1, as a product of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), had broadly antiviral activity against various viruses such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), adenoviruses (AdV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), dengue virus (DENV), Zika virus (ZIKV), and influenza virus (PR8) etc. This antiviral activity by TAP1 was further confirmed by series of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments. Our further investigation revealed that TAP1 significantly promoted the interferon (IFN)-ß production through activating the TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1) and the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) signaling transduction. Our work highlighted the broadly anti-viral function of TAP1 by modulating innate immunity, which is independent of its well-known function of antigen presentation. This study will provide insights into developing novel vaccination and immunotherapy strategies against emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/immunology , Antiviral Agents/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Interferon Type I/biosynthesis , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/antagonists & inhibitors , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/deficiency , ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 2/genetics , Animals , Gene Knockout Techniques , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Mice , Models, Immunological , RAW 264.7 Cells , Toll-Like Receptors/agonists , Virus Diseases/immunology
13.
Viruses ; 13(7)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335222

ABSTRACT

Viral infections cause a variety of acute and chronic human diseases, sometimes resulting in small local outbreaks, or in some cases spreading across the globe and leading to global pandemics. Understanding and exploiting virus-host interactions is instrumental for identifying host factors involved in viral replication, developing effective antiviral agents, and mitigating the severity of virus-borne infectious diseases. The diversity of CRISPR systems and CRISPR-based tools enables the specific modulation of innate immune responses and has contributed impressively to the fields of virology and immunology in a very short time. In this review, we describe the most recent advances in the use of CRISPR systems for basic and translational studies of virus-host interactions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , CRISPR-Cas Systems , Virus Diseases/immunology , Animals , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/immunology , RNA Editing , Transcriptome , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Internalization , Virus Replication/drug effects
14.
Front Immunol ; 12: 690416, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317226

ABSTRACT

The AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase)/APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic subunit) family with its multifaceted mode of action emerges as potent intrinsic host antiviral system that acts against a variety of DNA and RNA viruses including coronaviruses. All family members are cytosine-to-uracil deaminases that either have a profound role in driving a strong and specific humoral immune response (AID) or restricting the virus itself by a plethora of mechanisms (APOBECs). In this article, we highlight some of the key aspects apparently linking the AID/APOBECs and SARS-CoV-2. Among those is our discovery that APOBEC4 shows high expression in cell types and anatomical parts targeted by SARS-CoV-2. Additional focus is given by us to the lymphoid structures and AID as the master regulator of germinal center reactions, which result in antibody production by plasma and memory B cells. We propose the dissection of the AID/APOBECs gene signature towards decisive determinants of the patient-specific and/or the patient group-specific antiviral response. Finally, the patient-specific mapping of the AID/APOBEC polymorphisms should be considered in the light of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
APOBEC-1 Deaminase/genetics , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytidine Deaminase/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Transcriptome , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Germinal Center/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral/genetics , Plasma Cells/immunology , Polymorphism, Genetic , RNA Editing/genetics , RNA, Viral/genetics
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 658519, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317222

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a highly pathogenic novel virus that has caused a massive pandemic called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) worldwide. Wuhan, a city in China became the epicenter of the outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019. The disease was declared a pandemic globally by the World Health Organization (WHO) on 11 March 2020. SARS-CoV-2 is a beta CoV of the Coronaviridae family which usually causes respiratory symptoms that resemble common cold. Multiple countries have experienced multiple waves of the disease and scientific experts are consistently working to find answers to several unresolved questions, with the aim to find the most suitable ways to contain the virus. Furthermore, potential therapeutic strategies and vaccine development for COVID-19 management are also considered. Currently, substantial efforts have been made to develop successful and safe treatments and SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Some vaccines, such as inactivated vaccines, nucleic acid-based, and vector-based vaccines, have entered phase 3 clinical trials. Additionally, diverse small molecule drugs, peptides and antibodies are being developed to treat COVID-19. We present here an overview of the virus interaction with the host and environment and anti-CoV therapeutic strategies; including vaccines and other methodologies, designed for prophylaxis and treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with the hope that this integrative analysis could help develop novel therapeutic approaches against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity , Mutation Rate , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Small Molecule Libraries/therapeutic use , Vaccines, DNA/immunology , Vaccines, DNA/therapeutic use , Vaccines, Inactivated/immunology , Vaccines, Inactivated/therapeutic use
16.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(7): e1009761, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315898

ABSTRACT

T-cell immunity is likely to play a role in protection against SARS-CoV-2 by helping generate neutralizing antibodies. We longitudinally studied CD4 T-cell responses to the M, N, and S structural proteins of SARS-CoV-2 in 26 convalescent individuals. Within the first two months following symptom onset, a majority of individuals (81%) mounted at least one CD4 T-cell response, and 48% of individuals mounted detectable SARS-CoV-2-specific circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh, defined as CXCR5+PD1+ CD4 T cells). SARS-CoV-2-specific cTfh responses across all three protein specificities correlated with antibody neutralization with the strongest correlation observed for S protein-specific responses. When examined over time, cTfh responses, particularly to the M protein, increased in convalescence, and robust cTfh responses with magnitudes greater than 5% were detected at the second convalescent visit, a median of 38 days post-symptom onset. CD4 T-cell responses declined but persisted at low magnitudes three months and six months after symptom onset. These data deepen our understanding of antigen-specific cTfh responses in SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting that in addition to S protein, M and N protein-specific cTfh may also assist in the development of neutralizing antibodies and that cTfh response formation may be delayed in SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T Follicular Helper Cells/immunology , T Follicular Helper Cells/virology , Adult , Aged , Antibody Specificity , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Female , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Phosphoproteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors , Viral Matrix Proteins/immunology , Young Adult
17.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(7): e1009753, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309967

ABSTRACT

To understand the diversity of immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 and distinguish features that predispose individuals to severe COVID-19, we developed a mechanistic, within-host mathematical model and virtual patient cohort. Our results suggest that virtual patients with low production rates of infected cell derived IFN subsequently experienced highly inflammatory disease phenotypes, compared to those with early and robust IFN responses. In these in silico patients, the maximum concentration of IL-6 was also a major predictor of CD8+ T cell depletion. Our analyses predicted that individuals with severe COVID-19 also have accelerated monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation mediated by increased IL-6 and reduced type I IFN signalling. Together, these findings suggest biomarkers driving the development of severe COVID-19 and support early interventions aimed at reducing inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Models, Immunological , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers/metabolism , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Computational Biology , Computer Simulation , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Macrophages/immunology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , User-Computer Interface
18.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(7): 1043-1047, 2021 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309197

ABSTRACT

Severe COVID-19 arises from the convergence of inadequate pre-existing immunity and a host response that damages, rather than repairs, tissues. We outline clinical presentations of COVID-19 that are likely driven by dysregulated host immunity, discuss potential mechanisms underlying pathological responses, and highlight important areas for basic research on this topic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Immunity , Immunocompromised Host , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
20.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(6): 2348-2359, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268104

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) viral infection, which can lead to pneumonia, lung injury, and death in susceptible populations. Understanding viral dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 is critical for development of effective treatments. An Immune-Viral Dynamics Model (IVDM) is developed to describe SARS-CoV-2 viral dynamics and COVID-19 disease progression. A dataset of 60 individual patients with COVID-19 with clinical viral load (VL) and reported disease severity were assembled from literature. Viral infection and replication mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2, viral-induced cell death, and time-dependent immune response are incorporated in the model to describe the dynamics of viruses and immune response. Disease severity are tested as a covariate to model parameters. The IVDM was fitted to the data and parameters were estimated using the nonlinear mixed-effect model. The model can adequately describe individual viral dynamics profiles, with disease severity identified as a covariate on infected cell death rate. The modeling suggested that it takes about 32.6 days to reach 50% of maximum cell-based immunity. Simulations based on virtual populations suggested a typical mild case reaches VL limit of detection (LOD) by 13 days with no treatment, a moderate case by 17 days, and a severe case by 41 days. Simulations were used to explore hypothetical treatments with different initiation time, disease severity, and drug effects to demonstrate the usefulness of such modeling in informing decisions. Overall, the IVDM modeling and simulation platform enables simulations for viral dynamics and treatment efficacy and can be used to aid in clinical pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) and dose-efficacy response analysis for COVID-19 drug development.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Development/methods , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Models, Biological , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cell Death/drug effects , Cell Death/immunology , Datasets as Topic , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Host Microbial Interactions/drug effects , Humans , Nonlinear Dynamics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Viral Load
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...