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1.
Am J Emerg Med ; 53: 1-5, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588529

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore trends and patterns of laypeople's activity for seeking telephone number of emergency medical services (EMS) based on analysis of online search traffic, including changes of the search activity with onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, in five countries - the United States of America (USA), India, Brazil, the United Kingdom (UK) and Russia. METHODS: Google Trends (GT) country-level data on weekly relative search volumes (RSV) for top queries to seek EMS number were examined for January 2018-October 2021, including a comparison of RSVs between pre-COVID-19 period (January 2018-October 2019) and COVID-19 period (January 2020-October 2021), and evaluation of temporal associations of RSVs with weekly numbers of new COVID-19 cases. RESULTS: The countries demonstrated diverse patterns of the search activity with significantly different mean RSVs (the USA 1.76, India 10.20, Brazil 2.51, the UK 6.42, Russia 56.79; p < 0.001). For all countries excepting the USA mean RSVs of the COVID-19 period were significantly higher compared with the pre-COVID-19 ones (India +74%, Brazil +148%, the UK +22%, Russia +9%; p ≤ 0.034), and exhibited positive correlations with numbers of new COVID-19 cases, more pronounced for 2021 (India rS = 0.538, Brazil 0.307, the UK 0.434, Russia 0.639; p ≤ 0.045). CONCLUSION: Laypeople's activity for seeking EMS telephone number greatly varies between countries. It clearly responds to the spread of COVID-19 and could be reflective of public need for obtaining emergency help. Further studies are required to establish the role of GT for conducting real-time surveillance of population demand for EMS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Information Seeking Behavior , Brazil , COVID-19/therapy , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Hotlines/methods , Humans , India , Russia , United States , Web Browser/statistics & numerical data
2.
Nature ; 600(7887): 121-126, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521756

ABSTRACT

Mental health is an important component of public health, especially in times of crisis. However, monitoring public mental health is difficult because data are often patchy and low-frequency1-3. Here we complement established approaches by using data from helplines, which offer a real-time measure of 'revealed' distress and mental health concerns across a range of topics4-9. We collected data on 8 million calls from 19 countries, focusing on the COVID-19 crisis. Call volumes peaked six weeks after the initial outbreak, at 35% above pre-pandemic levels. The increase was driven mainly by fear (including fear of infection), loneliness and, later in the pandemic, concerns about physical health. Relationship issues, economic problems, violence and suicidal ideation, however, were less prevalent than before the pandemic. This pattern was apparent both during the first wave and during subsequent COVID-19 waves. Issues linked directly to the pandemic therefore seem to have replaced rather than exacerbated underlying anxieties. Conditional on infection rates, suicide-related calls increased when containment policies became more stringent and decreased when income support was extended. This implies that financial relief can allay the distress triggered by lockdown measures and illustrates the insights that can be gleaned from the statistical analysis of helpline data.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Behavior, Addictive , Datasets as Topic , Employment , Fear , Female , France/epidemiology , Germany/epidemiology , Health , Health Policy , Humans , Internationality , Loneliness , Male , United States/epidemiology , Violence
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(11): e28105, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, rapidly rising disease prevalence in the United States created a demand for patient-facing information exchanges that addressed questions and concerns about the disease. One approach to managing increased patient volumes during a pandemic involves the implementation of telephone-based triage systems. During a pandemic, telephone triage hotlines can be employed in innovative ways to conserve medical resources and offer useful population-level data about disease symptomatology and risk factor profiles. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe and evaluate the COVID-19 telephone triage hotline used by a large academic medical center in the midwestern United States. METHODS: Michigan Medicine established a telephone hotline to triage inbound patient calls related to COVID-19. For calls received between March 24, 2020, and May 5, 2020, we described total call volume, data reported by callers including COVID-19 risk factors and symptomatology, and distribution of callers to triage algorithm endpoints. We also described symptomatology reported by callers who were directed to the institutional patient portal (online medical visit questionnaire). RESULTS: A total of 3929 calls (average 91 calls per day) were received by the call center during the study period. The maximum total number of daily calls peaked at 211 on March 24, 2020. Call volumes were the highest from 6 AM to 11 AM and during evening hours. Callers were most often directed to the online patient portal (1654/3929, 42%), nursing hotlines (1338/3929, 34%), or employee health services (709/3929, 18%). Cough (126/370 of callers, 34%), shortness of breath (101/370, 27%), upper respiratory infection (28/111, 25%), and fever (89/370, 24%) were the most commonly reported symptoms. Immunocompromised state (23/370, 6%) and age >65 years (18/370, 5%) were the most commonly reported risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The triage algorithm successfully diverted low-risk patients to suitable algorithm endpoints, while directing high-risk patients onward for immediate assessment. Data collected from hotline calls also enhanced knowledge of symptoms and risk factors that typified community members, demonstrating that pandemic hotlines can aid in the clinical characterization of novel diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hotlines , Aged , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Telephone , Triage , United States
7.
J Adolesc Health ; 68(6): 1067-1074, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179710

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The benefits of helplines are particularly valuable during a pandemic when face-to-face services and natural supports are difficult to access. Kids Helpline, Australia's national youth helpline, provides children and young people with free 24/7 information and counseling through telephone, WebChat, and e-mail. We aimed to examine the use of Kids Helpline during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We analyzed monthly and weekly time trends of demand for and response by the Kids Helpline. The frequency of counseling contacts by common concern types, age, and gender were also examined. We used Joinpoint regression. RESULTS: Analyses of weekly demand for Kids Helpline showed an increase when the pandemic was declared, followed by a gradual decline. A second rise from 12 July 2020 when parts of Australia experienced a second wave of infections, followed by another decline, occurred more recently. Increased demand was almost entirely in the WebChat modality. Most answered counseling contacts were from girls and those aged 13-18 years. The number of contacts about mental health, suicide/self-harm, and family relationships increased, with mental health contacts also increasing as a proportion of total contacts. COVID-19-related concerns were the most common reason for contact in April 2020. CONCLUSIONS: In Australia, the COVID-19 pandemic saw a rapid increase in demand for Kids Helpline, mainly by WebChat, with the virus itself, mental health, suicide/self-harm, and relationships common reasons for contact. Responding to rapid changes in demand for particular modalities is challenging and understanding of the use and effectiveness of different modalities is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adolescent , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Counseling , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929280, 2021 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND In addition to sociodemographic and COVID-19- related factors, the needs of school support, including material, psychological and information support, have seldom been discussed as factors influencing anxiety and depression among college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 3351 college students from China were surveyed through questionnaires about their sociodemographic and COVID-19 characteristics, the needs of school support, and their experiences with anxiety and depression. RESULTS Anxiety and depression were reported by 6.88% and 10.50% of students, respectively. Married, higher education, non-medical, and urban students had significantly higher risks of anxiety or depression. Additionally, symptoms such as cough and fever, especially when following a possible contact with suspected individuals, quarantine history of a personal contact, going out 1-3 times a week, not wearing a mask, and spending 2-3 hours browsing COVID-19-related information were significantly associated with the occurrence of anxiety or depression. Those who used methods to regulate their emotional state, used a psychological hotline, and who had visited a psychiatrist showed higher anxiety or depression. Those who used online curricula and books, used preventive methods for COVID-19, and who had real-time information about the epidemic situation of the school showed lower anxiety and depression. CONCLUSIONS In addition to sociodemographic and COVID-19-related aspects, students' needs for psychological assistance and information from schools were also associated with anxiety and depression among college students.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Schools/organization & administration , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Female , Financial Support , Health Education/organization & administration , Health Education/statistics & numerical data , Hotlines/organization & administration , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Information Dissemination , Male , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Psychosocial Support Systems , Schools/economics , Schools/standards , Socioeconomic Factors , Students/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(Suppl): S95-S102, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) and the associated coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) have presented immense challenges for health care systems. Many regions have struggled to adapt to disruptions to health care practice and use systems that effectively manage the demand for services. METHODS: This was a cohort study using electronic health records at a health care system in northeast Ohio that examined the effectiveness of the first 5 weeks of a 24/7 physician-staffed COVID-19 hotline including social care referrals for patients required to self-isolate. We describe clinical diagnosis, patient characteristics (age, sex race/ethnicity, smoking status, insurance status), and visit disposition. We use logistic regression to evaluate associations between patient characteristics, visit disposition and subsequent emergency department use, hospitalization, and SARS-Cov-2 PCR testing. PARTICIPANTS: In 5 weeks, 10,112 patients called the hotline (callers). Of these, 4213 (42%) were referred for a physician telehealth visit (telehealth patients). Mean age of callers was 42 years; 67% were female, 51% white, and 46% were on Medicaid/uninsured. RESULTS: Common caller concerns included cough, fever, and shortness of breath. Most telehealth patients (79%) were advised to self-isolate at home, 14% were determined to be unlikely to have COVID-19, 3% were advised to seek emergency care, and 4% had miscellaneous other dispositions. A total of 287 patients (7%) had a subsequent emergency department visit, and 44 (1%) were hospitalized with a COVID-19 diagnosis. Of the callers, 482 (5%) had a COVID-19 test reported, with 69 (14%) testing positive. Among patients advised to stay at home, 83% had no further face-to-face visits. In multivariable results, only a physician recommendation to seek emergency care was associated with emergency department use (odds ratio = 4.73, 95% confidence interval = 1.37-16.39, P = .014). Only older age was associated with having a positive test result. Patients with social needs and interest in receiving help were offered services to meet their needs including food deliveries (n = 92), behavioral health telephone visits (n = 49), and faith-based comfort calls from pastoral care personnel (n = 37). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Robust, physician-directed telehealth services can meet a wide range of clinical and social needs during the acute phase of a pandemic, conserving scarce resources such as personal protective equipment and testing supplies and preventing the spread of infections to patients and health care workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Ohio/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Referral and Consultation/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
10.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(Suppl): S170-S178, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099982

ABSTRACT

To respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and recover from its aftermath, primary care teams will face waves of overwhelming demand for information and the need to significantly transform care delivery. INNOVATION: Oregon Health & Science University's primary care team envisioned and implemented the COVID-19 Connected Care Center, a statewide telephone "hotline" service. RESULTS: The hotline has taken more than 5825 calls from patients in 33 of Oregon's 36 counties in less than 3 months. In preliminary survey data, 86% of patients said their questions were answered during the call, 90% would recommend this service, and 70% reported a reduction in stress levels about coronavirus. In qualitative interviews, patients reported their questions answered, short wait times, nurses spent time as needed, and appropriate follow-up was arranged. CONCLUSION: Academic health centers may have the capacity to leverage their extensive resources to rapidly launch a multiphased pandemic response that meets peoples' need for information and access to primary care, while minimizing risk of infection and emergency department use and rapidly supporting primary care teams to make the necessary operational changes to do the same in their communities. Such efforts require external funding in a fee-for-service payment model.


Subject(s)
Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fee-for-Service Plans , Hotlines/organization & administration , Humans , Oregon/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/economics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Triage/methods
11.
Soc Sci Med ; 265: 113532, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023754

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is an immense global health threat that has invoked unheard-of containment measures in numerous countries to reduce the number of new infections. OBJECTIVE: The sequential introduction of severe measures, intentionally aiming at reducing the number of new infections, also imposes sharp restrictions on populations with potentially unintended, detrimental effects on public mental health. METHOD: We used observational data reflecting the number of phone calls made to national crisis hotlines in Austria and Germany during the COVID-19 pandemic (January 2020-April 2020) to investigate the impact of government restrictions as well as their later revocations on public mental health. Importantly, both countries have comparable health care systems, are similar in their political and socio-economic idiosyncrasies, and took similar restrictive government measures in order to contain COVID-19-but implemented them at different points in time. RESULTS: Analysis indicated that the number of crisis hotline calls increased in both countries. This increase seemed to occur at around the same time as the implementation of restrictive governmental responses. Importantly, the revocation of these governmental restrictions (i.e., re-opening the economy, allowing more social contact) seemed to occur at around the same time as the decrease in the number of calls. CONCLUSIONS: The present study supports the notion that the implementation of severe measures affects public mental health. However, the negative mental health effects of COVID-19 may be reduced if severe governmental restrictions are kept in place as briefly as possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Government , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Austria/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(22)2020 11 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-927788

ABSTRACT

Tobacco use is a possible risk factor for contracting and spreading COVID-19. We aimed to describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Youth Quitline service and quitting behaviors of its users in Hong Kong. We conducted a telephone survey involving 201 participants of the Youth Quitline service, and retrospectively analyzed the operation and use of Quitline since the COVID-19 outbreak in Hong Kong. The number of incoming calls to the Youth Quitline and the participants' quit rate has increased since the COVID-19 outbreak in Hong Kong. Many participants (68%) did not realize that tobacco use potentially increased their risk for developing and spreading COVID-19; however, 43% agreed that the pandemic motivated their intention to quit, and 83% changed their smoking habits during the pandemic. These changes were mainly due to wearing masks (30%), closure of bars/pubs (25%), suspension of classes (14%), and being unable to socialize with friends (24%). Overall, 58% reduced their tobacco use; of these participants, 66% reported a ≥50% reduction in daily cigarette consumption. The participants reduced their smoking during the COVID-19 pandemic despite lacking knowledge about the potentially increased risk for contracting COVID-19 from continued smoking. The pandemic could create new opportunities to motivate young smokers to quit smoking, especially those seeking support for smoking cessation, and may further contribute to reducing the risks posed by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Smoking Cessation/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
13.
Healthc (Amst) ; 8(4): 100493, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893783

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created unique challenges for the U.S. healthcare system due to the staggering mismatch between healthcare system capacity and patient demand. The healthcare industry has been a relatively slow adopter of digital innovation due to the conventional belief that humans need to be at the center of healthcare delivery tasks. However, in the setting of the COVID-19 pandemic, artificial intelligence (AI) may be used to carry out specific tasks such as pre-hospital triage and enable clinicians to deliver care at scale. Recognizing that the majority of COVID-19 cases are mild and do not require hospitalization, Partners HealthCare (now Mass General Brigham) implemented a digitally-automated pre-hospital triage solution to direct patients to the appropriate care setting before they showed up at the emergency department and clinics, which would otherwise consume resources, expose other patients and staff to potential viral transmission, and further exacerbate supply-and-demand mismatching. Although the use of AI has been well-established in other industries to optimize supply and demand matching, the introduction of AI to perform tasks remotely that were traditionally performed in-person by clinical staff represents a significant milestone in healthcare operations strategy.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Triage/methods , Clinical Decision-Making/methods , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Massachusetts , Pandemics , Population Health Management
14.
Zhejiang Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 49(4): 409-418, 2020 Aug 25.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-803260

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the usage of mental health assistance hotline during COVID-19 in Zhejiang province from January 25th to February 29th 2020, and summarize the characteristics of the demand for mental health services and the dynamic changes of public mental health status during COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. The calls related to pandemic were divided into four categories: medical, psychological, information and the others. The secondary categories of psychological calls were determined by text analysis. The number of calls were calculated weekly and the number of various types of calls over time were analyzed. We used stratified random sampling method to extract 600 cases of all kinds of calls related to pandemic and conducted a semantic analysis, through marking new, similar combination to form a feature set, then summed up the call content characteristics of each stage. Two hundred callers were followed up to understand how they felt about the call process in four aspects: the waiting time, call duration, the degree of problem-solving and the way to end the call. RESULTS: In a total of 13 746 calls, 8978 were related to pandemic, among which 12.59%(1130/8978) were about medical issues, 26.50%(2379/8978) were about mental health, 27.18%(2440/8978) were about information regarding the pandemic and 33.74%(3029/8978) were about other pandemic related issues. Pandemic situation, relevant policy release, frequency of advertising campaigns were predictors of the number of calls per day during the pandemic (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The number of calls differed by gender and identities of callers (both P<0.05). Finally 181 callers accepted telephone follow-up. Among them, 51.38%(93/181) of the callers thought that the waiting time was too long, 33.15%(60/181) of the callers thought that the call time was insufficient, 80.66%(146/181) of callers believed that the hotline could partially or completely resolve their concerns, and 39.23%(71/181) of the callers said the operator proposed to end the call. CONCLUSIONS: s The changes of the number and content of the mental health assistance hotline calls reflected that the public mental health status experienced four stages during the pandemic: confusion, panic, boredom, and adjustment. The specialized mental health assistance hotlines should be further strengthened, and the efficiency should be improved. Mental health interventions should be tailored and adopted according to the characteristics of the public mental health status at different stages of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Hotlines , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Public Health/statistics & numerical data
15.
Child Abuse Negl ; 116(Pt 2): 104757, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many of the measures taken by countries to contain the spread of COVID-19 have resulted in disruptions to child protection services. Despite this, many countries have worked to ensure that child helplines remain operational, making such mechanisms even more critical for reporting and referring cases of violence and for providing support to victims. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this paper is to document what has occurred, and been reported, to child helplines during the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: The study entailed primary data collection from child helplines and a search of media articles and news stories. METHODS: Child helplines submitted data on the contacts received during the first six months of 2020. Data on contacts related to violence were also available from 2019, and used as baseline. The media search used a combination of search terms to identify relevant articles and news stories published between March 1 and June 17, 2020. RESULTS: Overall, the number of contacts to child helplines seems to have drastically increased since the beginning of the pandemic. However, the number of contacts related to violence has increased in some countries, while it decreased in others. CONCLUSIONS: While a mixed picture emerges with respect to violence, the increase in overall contacts made to child helplines provides evidence that such services are a critical lifeline for many children and women during times of crisis. Child helplines should be strengthened; and child protection services should be designated as essential during emergencies to ensure children receive the support they need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child Abuse/statistics & numerical data , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Child , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Emerg Med ; 59(5): 668-672, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-753303

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Households are increasingly stockpiling and producing hand sanitizer amid the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which can pose an increased risk for unintentional toxicity among children. Despite guidelines for hand sanitizer production published by the World Health Organization, many turn to streaming media for instruction. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate hand sanitizer formulations and safety precautions discussed in popular do-it-yourself (DIY) YouTube videos, and to assess the frequency of calls to poison control centers for pediatric hand sanitizer exposure before and after the arrival of COVID-19 in the United States. METHODS: The first 100 videos on YouTube with the most views using the search term "DIY hand sanitizer" were evaluated for accuracy compared with the World Health Organization local hand sanitizer production guidelines. The incidence of pediatric hand sanitizer exposure reported to participating U.S. poison control centers from January 2018 through May 2020 was reviewed from the American Association of Poison Control Centers National Poison Data System. The average number of calls between January 2020 and May 2020 was compared, and the average number of calls in March 2020 was compared with March 2019 and March 2018. RESULTS: Of the YouTube videos that met inclusion criteria, 27% discussed the use of at least 96% ethanol or 99.8% isopropyl alcohol, 4.1% incorporated 3% hydrogen peroxide, 82% used glycerol or an alternative humectant, and 4.1% specified the need for distilled or previously boiled water. Most of the videos failed to describe labeling storage containers, 69% of videos encouraged the use of oils or perfumes to enhance hand sanitizer scent, and 2% of videos promoted the use of coloring agents to be more attractive for use among children specifically. There was a significantly increased average number of daily calls to poison control centers regarding unsafe pediatric hand sanitizer exposure since the first confirmed COVID-19 patient in the United States. There was a significantly increased average number of daily calls in March 2020 compared with the previous 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: YouTube may not be an accurate source for effective hand sanitizer concoction. Health care providers and parents should be aware of the increased surge in hand sanitizer exposure among children and should take proper precautionary measures.


Subject(s)
Hand Sanitizers/adverse effects , Hand Sanitizers/chemical synthesis , Hotlines/trends , Poison Control Centers , Social Media , Video Recording , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child Health , Consumer Health Information , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , United States/epidemiology
17.
Asia Pac Psychiatry ; 13(2): e12407, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719343

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To provide a brief description of COVID-19-related issues presented by callers to a tele-counseling helpline in Bangladesh. METHOD: Counselors who receive calls write brief descriptions of each call. These descriptions were coded and analyzed. RESULTS: Eighty-six percent of callers displayed anxiety and/or sleeplessness; these callers also displayed a range of issues including family/interpersonal problems, financial difficulties, physical health concerns, mental illness, and difficulty managing quarantine. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate the mental health challenges faced in Bangladesh due to lockdown and can inform future interventions.


Subject(s)
Behavioral Symptoms/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Counseling/statistics & numerical data , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Bangladesh , Humans
19.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0236777, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-689636

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), which causes the COVID-19 respiratory illness, emerged in December of 2019 and has since spread globally. The dramatic lifestyle changes and stressors associated with this pandemic pose a threat to mental health and have the potential to exacerbate risk factors for suicide. We used autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models to assess Google Trends data representing searches in the United States for 18 terms related to suicide and known suicide risk factors following the emergence of COVID-19. Although the relative proportion of Google searches for suicide-related queries was lower than predicted during the early pandemic period, searches for the following queries representative of financial difficulty were dramatically elevated: "I lost my job" (226%; 95%CI, 120%-333%), "laid off" (1164%; 95%CI, 395%-1932%), "unemployment" (1238%; 95%CI, 560%-1915%), and "furlough" (5717%; 95%CI, 2769%-8665%). Searches for the Disaster Distress Helpline, which was promoted as a source of help for those impacted by COVID-19, were also remarkably elevated (3021%; 95%CI, 873%-5169%). Google searches for other queries representative of help-seeking and general mental health concerns were moderately elevated. It appears that some indices of suicidality have fallen in the United States in this early stage of the pandemic, but that COVID-19 may have caused an increase in suicide risk factors that could yield long-term increases in suicidality and suicide rates.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Search Engine/statistics & numerical data , Suicide/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Help-Seeking Behavior , Hotlines/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicidal Ideation , Unemployment/psychology , United States
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