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2.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 81(1): 2076383, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2151734

ABSTRACT

The aim of this paper was to describe the study design, data collection procedure and participation of the population-based study "Sámi Health on Equal Terms" (SámiHET) conducted among the Sámi in Sweden in 2021. A Sámi sample was constructed, drawing from three pre-existing-registers: the Sámi electoral roll, the reindeer mark register and the "Labour statistics based on administrative sources" register to identify reindeer herding businesses. All identified persons aged 18-84 were invited to participate during February-May 2021. Among the 9,249 invitations, 3,779 answered the survey (participation rate of 40.9%). More women than men participated, and the age group 45-64 was the most common in both sexes. Around 10% of participants were in the youngest group. A majority of participants were residents of Norrbotten (48%), while almost one fourth were living outside Sápmi (22%). SámiHET has been demonstrated to be a feasible and cost-effective way of investigating health and living conditions among the Sámi in Sweden, providing information easy to compare with Swedish data. The knowledge to be produced may be used to inform policy to guide and improve Sámi health, thus contributing to realising the equal health rights of the Indigenous Sámi in Sweden.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Social Conditions , Female , Human Rights , Humans , Male , Norway , Research Design , Sweden/epidemiology
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6.
Glob Public Health ; 17(10): 2373-2387, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097152

ABSTRACT

This illustrated conversation between The Incredible, Edible, Akynos, Monica Jones, PJ Starr and Bambi Katsura unpacks how we use media to continue our sex worker activism during the multiple pandemics of COVID-19, police violence and environmental disasters. We each bring our histories and theoretical innovations to the table including the framework of the 'Whore Gaze' developed by PJ, Monica's approach to documentary that ensures trans people narrate their own lives, Akynos' scripted film series Chronicles of a Black Heaux that may re-imagine the 'melomentary form' for sex worker representation and Bambi's experience as a filmmaker and curator. In our conversation, we discuss how we use film, photography, film festivals, animation and other forms for our activism to promote social justice. We also describe how we are systematically unlearning the codes of representation of research and human rights documentation, so that we can create materials that are accessible to our communities, to people with disabilities and be freed from the dead-end of respectability politics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Human Rights , Humans , Membrane Proteins , Politics , Social Justice , Violence
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065961

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a real challenge for health systems and public policies. Both the pandemic and the measures taken to mitigate it have affected the freedoms and rights of the different sectors of society, especially the most vulnerable ones, and have increased the already existing structural inequalities. Consequently, the pandemic must be analyzed from the perspective of human rights. Transitional Justice (TJ) has proven to be useful after conflict situations, helping societies to confront abuses perpetrated and to find solutions for the future, as well as repairing damages that have arisen as a consequence of these conflicts in different areas. Thus, TJ processes have been successfully used after armed conflicts and during peace negotiations, to respond to abuses perpetrated in consolidated democracies, and even after environmental crises. Therefore, the creation of a "Truth and Reconciliation Commission for the COVID-19 pandemic", which launches the TJ processes of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-repetition can help to find solutions to conflicts arising from the pandemic in a simple way. In addition, it would establish the foundations to prevent the violation of human rights in similar situations to come.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Justice , Armed Conflicts , COVID-19/epidemiology , Human Rights , Humans , Pandemics
8.
Nat Ecol Evol ; 6(8): 1050-1051, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2016709
9.
Wiad Lek ; 75(6): 1699-1704, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1994974

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim: The study aims to develop ways of solving the social and legal problems of vaccination against COVID-19, showing them the example of Ukraine before and after the beginning of the active phase of Russian aggression. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and methods: The study is based on international documents and legal acts adopted to combat the COVID-19 epidemic, the survey results of 165 ordinary Ukrainians on vaccination, interviewing health care organizers; statistical information, and content analysis of the media on vaccination, as well as ways of avoiding it. Dialectical, analytical-synthetic, system-structural methods, as well as methods of content analysis, questionnaires, interviews, and included observation, were used. CONCLUSION: Conclusions: Ways of overcoming the adverse socio-legal problems of vaccination and related background phenomena are to conduct quality information campaigns to inform the public about the benefits and safety of vaccination, counter misinformation, increase the availability of vaccines with a choice of vaccines from different manufacturers, and increase the effectiveness of criminal legal counteraction to forgery of documents confirming vaccination. After the imposition of martial law in Ukraine, there has been a change in the focus of public attention to solving vital problems, which, along with the transfer of anti-coronavirus restrictions to the status of recommendatory, creates danger of significant reduction in vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Human Rights , Humans , Ukraine , Vaccination
10.
Lancet ; 400(10350): 421, 2022 08 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972388
13.
Health Hum Rights ; 24(1): 59-75, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1958361

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the lack of resources and oversight that hinders medical care for incarcerated people in the United States. The US Supreme Court has held that "deliberate indifference" to "serious medical needs" violates the Constitution. But this legal standard does not assure the consistent provision of health care services. This leads the United States to fall behind European nations that define universal standards of care grounded in principles of human rights and the ideal of equivalence that incarcerated and non-incarcerated people are entitled to the same health care. In this paper, we review a diverse legal and policy literature and undertake a conceptual analysis of policy issues related to the standard of care in correctional health; we then describe a framework for moving incrementally closer toward a universal standard. The expansion of Medicaid funding and benefits to corrections facilities, alongside a system of comprehensive and enforceable external oversight, would meaningfully raise the standard of care. Although these changes on their own will not resolve all of the thorny health problems posed by mass incarceration, they present a tangible opportunity to move closer to the human rights ideal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prisoners , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services , Human Rights , Humans , Pandemics , United States
15.
Health Hum Rights ; 24(1): 121-123, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1958126
16.
Health Hum Rights ; 24(1): 5-19, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957972

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in rapidly evolving developments in digital health, and governments around the world are experimenting with different ways of introducing technological tools in the management and delivery of health care services. India, among the countries that faced one of the most serious outbreaks in the second wave of the pandemic, recently rolled out the National Digital Health Mission, which promises an integrated but federated digital architecture and a digital health ecosystem that will solve the information asymmetries of the health care sector in India. While the promises of the National Digital Health Mission are many, India's experience with using another digital tool during the pandemic-the CoWIN portal for vaccine management-alerts us to the human rights concerns of rapid introductions of digital tools to address infrastructural and governance challenges in health care. This paper attempts to take a closer look at these two digital tools and the potential human rights implications of the National Digital Health Mission, particularly for the right to health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Ecosystem , Human Rights , Humans , India
17.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1399, 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1951160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, governments put in place measures to curb the spread of COVID-19. Information on the effects of these measures on the urban poor is limited. This study aimed to explore the lived experiences of the urban poor in Kenya in the context of government's COVID-19 response measures and its impact on the human right to food. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted in two informal settlements in Nairobi between January and March 2021. Analysis draws on eight focus group discussions, eight in-depth interviews, 12 key informant interviews, two photovoice sessions and three digital storytelling sessions. Phenomenology was applied to understand an individual's lived experiences with the human right to food during COVID - 19. Thematic analysis was performed using NVIVO software. RESULTS: The human right to food was affected in various ways. Many people lost their livelihoods, affecting affordability of food, due to response measures such as social distancing, curfew, and lockdown. The food supply chain was disrupted causing limited availability and access to affordable, safe, adequate, and nutritious food. Consequently, hunger and an increased consumption of low-quality food was reported. Social protection measures were instituted. However, these were inadequate and marred by irregularities. Some households resorted to scavenging food from dumpsites, skipping meals, sex-work, urban-rural migration and depending on food donations to survive. On the positive side, some households resorted to progressive measures such as urban farming and food sharing in the community. Generally, the response measures could have been more sensitive to the human rights of the urban poor. CONCLUSIONS: The government's COVID-19 restrictive measures exacerbated the already existing vulnerability of the urban poor to food insecurity and violated their human right to food. Future response measures should be executed in ways that respect the human right to food and protect marginalized people from resultant vulnerabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Government , Human Rights , Humans , Kenya/epidemiology
18.
19.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 294: 709-710, 2022 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865436

ABSTRACT

The Italian health system is organised on a regional basis and services are provided by both public and private operators, affecting the planning of services, access to services by citizens and their health rights. The creation of an observatory monitoring the methods and times of access to healthcare services has been pursued. The preliminary phase of the project is presented, which will lead to the comparison of the data obtained from 2019, with an eye on the Covid-19 pandemic impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Facilities , Health Services Accessibility , Human Rights , Humans , Pandemics
20.
Bioethics ; 36(5): 482-485, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861213
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