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1.
Carbohydr Res ; 516: 108564, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1800172

ABSTRACT

Reaction of 2,3-O-isopropylidene-d-ribofuranosylamine with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene afforded the crystalline 2,3-O-isopropylidene-N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-ß-d-ribofuranosylamine (3) and a 1:1 crystalline complex of 2,3-O-isopropylidene-N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl-α-d-ribofuranosylamine and 2,3-O-isopropylidene-ß-d-ribofuranose; controlled acidic hydrolysis of 3 afforded N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl-α-d-ribopyranosylamine and not the expected ß-d-furanosylamine derivative. The structures of the new compounds were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.


Subject(s)
Ribose , Amino Sugars , Crystallography, X-Ray , Hydrolysis , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy , Ribose/analogs & derivatives
2.
Daru ; 30(1): 245-252, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664547

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The high mortality rate in severe cases of COVID-19 is mainly due to the strong upregulation of cytokines, called a cytokine storm. Hyperinflammation and multiple organ failure comprise the main clinical features of a cytokine storm. Nrf2 is a transcription factor which regulates the expression of genes involved in immune and inflammatory processes. Furthermore, Nrf2, as a master regulator, controls the activity of NF-κB which binds to the promoter of many pro-inflammatory genes inducible of various inflammatory factors. Inhibition of Nrf2 response was recently demonstrated in biopsies from patients with COVID-19, and Nrf2 agonists inhibited SARS-CoV-2 replication across cell lines in vitro. Glucosinolates and their hydrolysis products have excellent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects via the Nrf2 activation pathway, reduction in the NF-κB activation, and subsequent reduced cytokines levels. CONCLUSION: Accordingly, these compounds can be helpful in combating the cytokine storm associated with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokines/metabolism , Dietary Supplements , Glucosinolates , Humans , Hydrolysis , NF-E2-Related Factor 2 , NF-kappa B/metabolism
3.
PLoS Biol ; 19(12): e3001510, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592147

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infects a broader range of mammalian species than previously predicted, binding a diversity of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) orthologs despite extensive sequence divergence. Within this sequence degeneracy, we identify a rare sequence combination capable of conferring SARS-CoV-2 resistance. We demonstrate that this sequence was likely unattainable during human evolution due to deleterious effects on ACE2 carboxypeptidase activity, which has vasodilatory and cardioprotective functions in vivo. Across the 25 ACE2 sites implicated in viral binding, we identify 6 amino acid substitutions unique to mouse-one of the only known mammalian species resistant to SARS-CoV-2. Substituting human variants at these positions is sufficient to confer binding of the SARS-CoV-2 S protein to mouse ACE2, facilitating cellular infection. Conversely, substituting mouse variants into either human or dog ACE2 abolishes viral binding, diminishing cellular infection. However, these same substitutions decrease human ACE2 activity by 50% and are predicted as pathogenic, consistent with the extreme rarity of human polymorphisms at these sites. This trade-off can be avoided, however, depending on genetic background; if substituted simultaneously, these same mutations have no deleterious effect on dog ACE2 nor that of the rodent ancestor estimated to exist 70 million years ago. This genetic contingency (epistasis) may have therefore opened the road to resistance for some species, while making humans susceptible to viruses that use these ACE2 surfaces for binding, as does SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Disease Resistance/genetics , Epistasis, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Amino Acids , Angiotensin II/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/enzymology , COVID-19/genetics , Dogs , Evolution, Molecular , Gene Frequency , Humans , Hydrolysis , Mice , Mutation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virus Attachment
4.
Carbohydr Polym ; 280: 119006, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1588175

ABSTRACT

Caulerpa lentillifera (Bryopsidophyceae, Chlorophyta) is an edible seaweed attracting great attention for its expansion of farming scale and increasing consumption in these years. In the present study, a sulfated polysaccharide (CLSP-2) was isolated and separated from C. lentillifera, and its chemical structure was elucidated by a series of chemical and spectroscopic methods. Among these methods, mild acid hydrolysis and photocatalytic degradation were applied to release mono- and oligo-saccharide fragments which were further identified by HPLC-MSn analysis, affording the information of the sugar sequences and the sulfate substitution in CLSP-2. Results indicated that the backbone of CLSP-2 was constructed of →6)-ß-Manp-(1→ with sulfated branches at C2, which were comprised of prevalent →3)-ß-Galp4S-(1→, →3)-ß-Galp2,4S-(1→, and minor Xyl. In addition, the virus neutralization assay revealed that CLSP-2 could effectively protect HeLa cells against SARS-CoV-2 infection with an IC50 of 48.48 µg/mL. Hence, the present study suggests CLSP-2 as a promising agent against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Caulerpa/chemistry , Polysaccharides/chemistry , Polysaccharides/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , HeLa Cells , Humans , Hydrolysis , Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/methods , Mass Spectrometry/methods , Molecular Weight , Polysaccharides/analysis , SARS-CoV-2 , Seaweed/chemistry , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared/methods , Sulfates/chemistry
5.
Chem Biol Interact ; 351: 109744, 2022 Jan 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1509623

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir, an intravenous nucleotide prodrug, has been approved for treating COVID-19 in hospitalized adults and pediatric patients. Upon administration, remdesivir can be readily hydrolyzed to form its active form GS-441524, while the cleavage of the carboxylic ester into GS-704277 is the first step for remdesivir activation. This study aims to assign the key enzymes responsible for remdesivir hydrolysis in humans, as well as to investigate the kinetics of remdesivir hydrolysis in various enzyme sources. The results showed that remdesivir could be hydrolyzed to form GS-704277 in human plasma and the microsomes from human liver (HLMs), lung (HLuMs) and kidney (HKMs), while the hydrolytic rate of remdesivir in HLMs was the fastest. Chemical inhibition and reaction phenotyping assays suggested that human carboxylesterase 1 (hCES1A) played a predominant role in remdesivir hydrolysis, while cathepsin A (CTSA), acetylcholinesterase (AchE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BchE) contributed to a lesser extent. Enzymatic kinetic analyses demonstrated that remdesivir hydrolysis in hCES1A (SHUTCM) and HLMs showed similar kinetic plots and much closed Km values to each other. Meanwhile, GS-704277 formation rates were strongly correlated with the CES1A activities in HLM samples from different individual donors. Further investigation revealed that simvastatin (a therapeutic agent for adjuvant treating COVID-19) strongly inhibited remdesivir hydrolysis in both recombinant hCES1A and HLMs. Collectively, our findings reveal that hCES1A plays a predominant role in remdesivir hydrolysis in humans, which are very helpful for predicting inter-individual variability in response to remdesivir and for guiding the rational use of this anti-COVID-19 agent in clinical settings.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Carboxylesterase/metabolism , Acetylcholinesterase/chemistry , Acetylcholinesterase/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Butyrylcholinesterase/chemistry , Butyrylcholinesterase/metabolism , Carboxylesterase/chemistry , Cathepsin A/chemistry , Cathepsin A/metabolism , Humans , Hydrolysis/drug effects , Kinetics , Liver/metabolism , Microsomes, Liver/metabolism , Simvastatin/pharmacology
6.
Chem Commun (Camb) ; 57(83): 10911-10914, 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488037

ABSTRACT

We present Zn2+-dependent dimethyl-dipyridophenazine PNA conjugates as efficient RNA cleaving artificial enzymes. These PNAzymes display site-specific RNA cleavage with 10 minute half-lives and cleave clinically relevant RNA models.


Subject(s)
Peptide Nucleic Acids/chemistry , Phenazines/chemistry , Pyridines/chemistry , RNA/chemistry , Catalysis , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrolysis , Ribonucleases/chemistry , Zinc/chemistry
7.
J Hazard Mater ; 424(Pt A): 127294, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415558

ABSTRACT

Herbal medicine wastes (HMWs) are byproducts of medicine factories, which are mainly landfilled for their environmental problems. Only bearing in mind the contamination and concerns caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and environmental emissions, the worth of herbal medicine wastes management and conversion to green products can be understood. In this work, subcritical water treatment was carried out batch-wise in a stainless tube reactor in the pressure range of 0.792-30.0 MPa, varying the temperature (127-327 °C) and time (1-60 min) of extraction. This resulted in new and green material sources, including organic acids, amino acids, and sugars. Amazingly, at very low extraction times (below 5 min) and high temperatures (above 277 °C), about 99% of HMWs were efficaciously converted to clean products by subcritical hydrothermal treatment. The results of hydrothermal extraction after 5 min indicated that at low temperatures (127-227 °C), the total organic carbon in the aqueous phase increased as the residual solid phase decreased, reaching a peak around 220 °C. Acetone soluble extracts or fat phase appeared above 227 °C and reached a maximum yield of 21% at 357 °C. Aspartic acid, threonine, and glycine were the primary amino acids; glycolic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, and acetic acid were obtained as the main organic acids, glucose, fructose, and cellobiose were substantial sugars produced from the aqueous phase after 5 min of hydrothermal subcritical hydrolysis extraction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Waste , Water Purification , Herbal Medicine , Humans , Hydrolysis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Temperature
8.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 49(18): 10604-10617, 2021 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406489

ABSTRACT

RNA hydrolysis presents problems in manufacturing, long-term storage, world-wide delivery and in vivo stability of messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccines and therapeutics. A largely unexplored strategy to reduce mRNA hydrolysis is to redesign RNAs to form double-stranded regions, which are protected from in-line cleavage and enzymatic degradation, while coding for the same proteins. The amount of stabilization that this strategy can deliver and the most effective algorithmic approach to achieve stabilization remain poorly understood. Here, we present simple calculations for estimating RNA stability against hydrolysis, and a model that links the average unpaired probability of an mRNA, or AUP, to its overall hydrolysis rate. To characterize the stabilization achievable through structure design, we compare AUP optimization by conventional mRNA design methods to results from more computationally sophisticated algorithms and crowdsourcing through the OpenVaccine challenge on the Eterna platform. We find that rational design on Eterna and the more sophisticated algorithms lead to constructs with low AUP, which we term 'superfolder' mRNAs. These designs exhibit a wide diversity of sequence and structure features that may be desirable for translation, biophysical size, and immunogenicity. Furthermore, their folding is robust to temperature, computer modeling method, choice of flanking untranslated regions, and changes in target protein sequence, as illustrated by rapid redesign of superfolder mRNAs for B.1.351, P.1 and B.1.1.7 variants of the prefusion-stabilized SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Increases in in vitro mRNA half-life by at least two-fold appear immediately achievable.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , RNA, Double-Stranded/chemistry , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , RNA, Viral/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Base Pairing , Base Sequence , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Hydrolysis , RNA Stability , RNA, Double-Stranded/genetics , RNA, Double-Stranded/immunology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/immunology , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Thermodynamics
9.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 59(45): 20154-20160, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384106

ABSTRACT

Phosphoramidates composed of an amino acid and a nucleotide analogue are critical metabolites of prodrugs, such as remdesivir. Hydrolysis of the phosphoramidate liberates the nucleotide, which can then be phosphorylated to become the pharmacologically active triphosphate. Enzymatic hydrolysis has been demonstrated, but a spontaneous chemical process may also occur. We measured the rate of enzyme-free hydrolysis for 17 phosphoramidates of ribonucleotides with amino acids or related compounds at pH 7.5. Phosphoramidates of proline hydrolyzed fast, with a half-life time as short as 2.4 h for Pro-AMP in ethylimidazole-containing buffer at 37 °C; 45-fold faster than Ala-AMP and 120-fold faster than Phe-AMP. Crystal structures of Gly-AMP, Pro-AMP, ßPro-AMP and Phe-AMP bound to RNase A as crystallization chaperone showed how well the carboxylate is poised to attack the phosphoramidate, helping to explain this reactivity. Our results are significant for the design of new antiviral prodrugs.


Subject(s)
Amides/metabolism , Amino Acids/chemistry , Nucleotides/metabolism , Phosphoric Acids/metabolism , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/metabolism , Amides/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Catalytic Domain , Crystallography, X-Ray , Half-Life , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Hydrolysis , Kinetics , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nucleotides/chemistry , Phosphoric Acids/chemistry , Ribonuclease, Pancreatic/chemistry , Ribonuclease, Pancreatic/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
10.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3061, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387342

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has triggered global efforts to develop therapeutics. The main protease of SARS-CoV-2 (Mpro), critical for viral replication, is a key target for therapeutic development. An organoselenium drug called ebselen has been demonstrated to have potent Mpro inhibition and antiviral activity. We have examined the binding modes of ebselen and its derivative in Mpro via high resolution co-crystallography and investigated their chemical reactivity via mass spectrometry. Stronger Mpro inhibition than ebselen and potent ability to rescue infected cells were observed for a number of derivatives. A free selenium atom bound with cysteine of catalytic dyad has been revealed in crystallographic structures of Mpro with ebselen and MR6-31-2 suggesting hydrolysis of the enzyme bound organoselenium covalent adduct and formation of a phenolic by-product, confirmed by mass spectrometry. The target engagement with selenation mechanism of inhibition suggests wider therapeutic applications of these compounds against SARS-CoV-2 and other zoonotic beta-corona viruses.


Subject(s)
Azoles/pharmacology , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Organoselenium Compounds/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Azoles/chemistry , Catalytic Domain , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Cysteine/chemistry , Hydrolysis , Isoindoles , Models, Molecular , Organoselenium Compounds/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , Reference Standards , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Salicylanilides/chemistry , Salicylanilides/pharmacology , Selenium/metabolism
11.
Angew Chem Int Ed Engl ; 60(40): 21662-21667, 2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363645

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need to develop antiviral drugs and alleviate the current COVID-19 pandemic. Herein we report the design and construction of chimeric oligonucleotides comprising a 2'-OMe-modified antisense oligonucleotide and a 5'-phosphorylated 2'-5' poly(A)4 (4A2-5 ) to degrade envelope and spike RNAs of SARS-CoV-2. The oligonucleotide was used for searching and recognizing target viral RNA sequence, and the conjugated 4A2-5 was used for guided RNase L activation to sequence-specifically degrade viral RNAs. Since RNase L can potently cleave single-stranded RNA during innate antiviral response, degradation efficiencies with these chimeras were twice as much as those with only antisense oligonucleotides for both SARS-CoV-2 RNA targets. In pseudovirus infection models, chimera-S4 achieved potent and broad-spectrum inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 and its N501Y and/or ΔH69/ΔV70 mutants, indicating a promising antiviral agent based on the nucleic acid-hydrolysis targeting chimera (NATAC) strategy.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , Enzyme Activation/drug effects , Oligonucleotides, Antisense/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Drug Design , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Hydrolysis/drug effects , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Mutation , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vero Cells
12.
Biomed Chromatogr ; 35(12): e5212, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349236

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir (RDV) is the first antiviral drug, approved by the Food and Drug Administration, to treat severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. RDV is a relatively new chemical entity, 'ester prodrug', with no reported stability profile. Due to the urgency of its use and thus fast production, it is important to develop a stability-indicating method for its assay. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) with dual detection: diode array at 240 nm and fluorescence at λex/em 245/390 nm. Isocratic elution of acetonitrile and distilled water (acidified with phosphoric acid, pH 4) in the ratio of 55:45 (v/v), respectively, was used. The linearity range using HPLC-diode array detection was 0.1-15 µg/mL, whereas that using fluorimetric detection was 0.05-15 µg/mL. As per the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines, RDV has been degraded by accelerated alkaline, acidic, neutral hydrolysis, oxidative, heat, and photolytic stress conditions. Possible degradation hypothesis of the parent molecule has been suggested and illustrated. The proposed methods have achieved selective determination of the intact drug with no peaks overlapping in all assumptions. Extensive degradation confirms threatened drug stability at thermal and basic hydrolytic stressing. The developed methods were fully validated and proved suitable for quality control routine analysis of RDV in raw material and pharmaceutical dosage forms.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Prodrugs/chemistry , Acetonitriles/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/chemistry , Adenosine Monophosphate/pharmacology , Alanine/chemistry , Alanine/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , Chromatography, Reverse-Phase/methods , Drug Stability , Hot Temperature , Humans , Hydrolysis , Limit of Detection , Oxidation-Reduction , Photolysis
13.
Clin Biochem ; 96: 56-62, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305215

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Camostat mesilate is a drug that is being repurposed for new applications such as that against COVID-19 and prostate cancer. This induces a need for the development of an analytical method for the quantification of camostat and its metabolites in plasma samples. Camostat is, however, very unstable in whole blood and plasma due to its two ester bonds. The molecule is readily hydrolysed by esterases to 4-(4-guanidinobenzoyloxy)phenylacetic acid (GBPA) and further to 4-guanidinobenzoic acid (GBA). For reliable quantification of camostat, a technique is required that can instantly inhibit esterases when blood samples are collected. DESIGN AND METHODS: An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS) using stable isotopically labelled analogues as internal standards was developed and validated. Different esterase inhibitors were tested for their ability to stop the hydrolysis of camostat ester bonds. RESULTS: Both diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and paraoxon were discovered as efficient inhibitors of camostat metabolism at 10 mM concentrations. No significant changes in camostat and GBPA concentrations were observed in fluoride-citrate-DFP/paraoxon-preserved plasma after 24 h of storage at room temperature or 4 months of storage at -20 °C and -80 °C. The lower limits of quantification were 0.1 ng/mL for camostat and GBPA and 0.2 ng/mL for GBA. The mean true extraction recoveries were greater than 90%. The relative intra-laboratory reproducibility standard deviations were at a maximum of 8% at concentrations of 1-800 ng/mL. The trueness expressed as the relative bias of the test results was within ±3% at concentrations of 1-800 ng/mL. CONCLUSIONS: A methodology was developed that preserves camostat and GBPA in plasma samples and provides accurate and sensitive quantification of camostat, GBPA and GBA by UHPLC-MS/MS.


Subject(s)
Blood Specimen Collection/methods , Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid/methods , Esters/blood , Guanidines/blood , Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/drug therapy , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Esterases/antagonists & inhibitors , Esterases/metabolism , Esters/metabolism , Esters/pharmacology , Guanidines/pharmacology , Humans , Hydrolysis/drug effects , Isoflurophate/chemistry , Isoflurophate/pharmacology , Paraoxon/blood , Paraoxon/chemistry , Paraoxon/pharmacology , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
Molecules ; 26(12)2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282539

ABSTRACT

Furan-2-carboxylic acid was used as a starting material for the synthesis of dehydro-homopilopic acid. Esterification, hydrogenation and enzymatic hydrolysis followed by the reduction of Weinreb amides and a single-step attachment of a 1-methyl-imidazole residue allowed for the concise synthesis of both enantiomers of pilocarpine.


Subject(s)
4-Butyrolactone/analogs & derivatives , Furans/chemistry , Pilocarpine/chemical synthesis , 4-Butyrolactone/chemical synthesis , Amides/chemistry , Carboxylic Acids/chemistry , Esterification , Hydrogenation , Hydrolysis , Pilocarpine/chemistry , Stereoisomerism
15.
Blood ; 138(4): 344-349, 2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255893

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with the hypercoagulable state. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary cellular initiator of coagulation. Most of the TF expressed on cell surfaces remains cryptic. Sphingomyelin (SM) is responsible for maintaining TF in the encrypted state, and hydrolysis of SM by acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) increases TF activity. ASMase was shown to play a role in virus infection biology. In the present study, we investigated the role of ASMase in SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced TF procoagulant activity. Infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) with SARS-CoV-2 spike protein pseudovirus (SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV) markedly increased TF procoagulant activity at the cell surface and released TF+ extracellular vesicles. The pseudovirus infection did not increase either TF protein expression or phosphatidylserine externalization. SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV infection induced the translocation of ASMase to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, which led to the hydrolysis of SM in the membrane. Pharmacologic inhibitors or genetic silencing of ASMase attenuated SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV-induced increased TF activity. Inhibition of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme-2, attenuated SARS-CoV-2-SP-PV-induced increased TF activity. Overall, our data suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection activates the coagulation by decrypting TF through activation of ASMase. Our data suggest that the US Food and Drug Administration-approved functional inhibitors of ASMase may help treat hypercoagulability in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Macrophages/virology , Membrane Proteins/physiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thromboplastin/physiology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/complications , Cell-Derived Microparticles , Enzyme Activation , Humans , Hydrolysis , Macrophages/enzymology , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Plasmids , Protein Transport , RNA Interference , RNA, Small Interfering/genetics , Receptors, Virus/physiology , Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase/antagonists & inhibitors , Sphingomyelins/physiology , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/enzymology
16.
Protein Expr Purif ; 185: 105894, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209890

ABSTRACT

The novel Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 or COVID-19) has led to a world-wild pandemic. The replication of SARS-CoV-2 RNA genome involves the core replication-transcription complex (RTC, nsp12-nsp7-nsp8) and the proofreading complex (nsp14-nsp10) that can correct mismatched base pairs during replication. Structures and functions of SARS-CoV-2 RTC have been actively studied, yet little is known about SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-nsp10. Here, we purified, reconstituted, and characterized the SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-nsp10 proofreading nuclease in vitro. We show that SARS-CoV-2 nsp14 is activated by nsp10, functioning as a potent RNase that can hydrolyze RNAs in the context of single- and double-stranded RNA and RNA/DNA hybrid duplex. SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-nsp10 shows a metal-dependent nuclease activity but has different metal selectivity from RTC. While RTC is activated by Ca2+, nsp14-nsp10 is completely inhibited. Importantly, the reconstituted SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-nsp10 efficiently removed the A:A mismatch at the 3'-end of the primer, enabling the stalled RTC to restart RNA replication. Our collective results confirm that SARS-CoV-2 nsp14-nsp10 functions as the RNA proofreading complex in SARS-CoV-2 replication and provide a useful foundation to understand the structure and function of SARS-CoV-2 RNA metabolism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Exoribonucleases/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Viral Regulatory and Accessory Proteins/metabolism , Calcium/metabolism , Enzyme Activation , Humans , Hydrolysis , Substrate Specificity
17.
Viruses ; 13(4)2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178433

ABSTRACT

The virus behind the current pandemic, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the etiology of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and poses a critical public health threat worldwide. Effective therapeutics and vaccines against multiple coronaviruses remain unavailable. Single-chain variable fragment (scFv), a recombinant antibody, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against DNA and RNA viruses owing to its nucleic acid-hydrolyzing property. The antiviral activity of 3D8 scFv against SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses was evaluated in Vero E6 cell cultures. Viral growth was quantified with quantitative RT-qPCR and plaque assay. The nucleic acid-hydrolyzing activity of 3D8 was assessed through abzyme assays of in vitro viral transcripts and cell viability was determined by MTT assay. We found that 3D8 inhibited the replication of SARS-CoV-2, human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). Our results revealed the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of 3D8 scFv against SARS-CoV-2 in Vero E6 cells. Immunoblot and plaque assays showed the reduction of coronavirus nucleoproteins and infectious particles, respectively, in 3D8 scFv-treated cells. These data demonstrate the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of 3D8 against SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses. Thus, it could be considered a potential antiviral countermeasure against SARS-CoV-2 and zoonotic coronaviruses.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Single-Chain Antibodies/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cell Survival/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus/physiology , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Hydrolysis , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vero Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
18.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(2)2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006583

ABSTRACT

Macrodomains are proteins that recognize and hydrolyze ADP ribose (ADPR) modifications of intracellular proteins. Macrodomains are implicated in viral genome replication and interference with host cell immune responses. They are important to the infectious cycle of Coronaviridae and Togaviridae viruses. We describe crystal structures of the conserved macrodomain from the bat coronavirus (CoV) HKU4 in complex with ligands. The structures reveal a binding cavity that accommodates ADPR and analogs via local structural changes within the pocket. Using a radioactive assay, we present evidence of mono-ADPR (MAR) hydrolase activity. In silico analysis presents further evidence on recognition of the ADPR modification for hydrolysis. Mutational analysis of residues within the binding pocket resulted in diminished enzymatic activity and binding affinity. We conclude that the common structural features observed in the macrodomain in a bat CoV contribute to a conserved function that can be extended to other known macrodomains.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose/chemistry , Coronavirus/enzymology , Pyrophosphatases/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Animals , Binding Sites , Chiroptera , Coronavirus/genetics , Crystallography, X-Ray , Hydrolysis , Pyrophosphatases/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
19.
J Virol ; 95(3)2021 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039853

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other SARS-related CoVs encode 3 tandem macrodomains within nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3). The first macrodomain, Mac1, is conserved throughout CoVs and binds to and hydrolyzes mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) from target proteins. Mac1 likely counters host-mediated antiviral ADP-ribosylation, a posttranslational modification that is part of the host response to viral infections. Mac1 is essential for pathogenesis in multiple animal models of CoV infection, implicating it as a virulence factor and potential therapeutic target. Here, we report the crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 Mac1 in complex with ADP-ribose. SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Mac1 domains exhibit similar structural folds, and all 3 proteins bound to ADP-ribose with affinities in the low micromolar range. Importantly, using ADP-ribose-detecting binding reagents in both a gel-based assay and novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), we demonstrated de-MARylating activity for all 3 CoV Mac1 proteins, with the SARS-CoV-2 Mac1 protein leading to a more rapid loss of substrate than the others. In addition, none of these enzymes could hydrolyze poly-ADP-ribose. We conclude that the SARS-CoV-2 and other CoV Mac1 proteins are MAR-hydrolases with similar functions, indicating that compounds targeting CoV Mac1 proteins may have broad anti-CoV activity.IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 has recently emerged into the human population and has led to a worldwide pandemic of COVID-19 that has caused more than 1.2 million deaths worldwide. With no currently approved treatments, novel therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. All coronaviruses encode a highly conserved macrodomain (Mac1) that binds to and removes ADP-ribose adducts from proteins in a dynamic posttranslational process that is increasingly being recognized as an important factor that regulates viral infection. The macrodomain is essential for CoV pathogenesis and may be a novel therapeutic target. Thus, understanding its biochemistry and enzyme activity are critical first steps for these efforts. Here, we report the crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 Mac1 in complex with ADP-ribose and describe its ADP-ribose binding and hydrolysis activities in direct comparison to those of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV Mac1 proteins. These results are an important first step for the design and testing of potential therapies targeting this unique protein domain.


Subject(s)
N-Glycosyl Hydrolases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose/chemistry , Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Coronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus/enzymology , Coronavirus/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Hydrolysis , Kinetics , N-Glycosyl Hydrolases/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry
20.
J Virol ; 95(3)2021 01 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027782

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and other SARS-related CoVs encode 3 tandem macrodomains within nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3). The first macrodomain, Mac1, is conserved throughout CoVs and binds to and hydrolyzes mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) from target proteins. Mac1 likely counters host-mediated antiviral ADP-ribosylation, a posttranslational modification that is part of the host response to viral infections. Mac1 is essential for pathogenesis in multiple animal models of CoV infection, implicating it as a virulence factor and potential therapeutic target. Here, we report the crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 Mac1 in complex with ADP-ribose. SARS-CoV-2, SARS-CoV, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Mac1 domains exhibit similar structural folds, and all 3 proteins bound to ADP-ribose with affinities in the low micromolar range. Importantly, using ADP-ribose-detecting binding reagents in both a gel-based assay and novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), we demonstrated de-MARylating activity for all 3 CoV Mac1 proteins, with the SARS-CoV-2 Mac1 protein leading to a more rapid loss of substrate than the others. In addition, none of these enzymes could hydrolyze poly-ADP-ribose. We conclude that the SARS-CoV-2 and other CoV Mac1 proteins are MAR-hydrolases with similar functions, indicating that compounds targeting CoV Mac1 proteins may have broad anti-CoV activity.IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 has recently emerged into the human population and has led to a worldwide pandemic of COVID-19 that has caused more than 1.2 million deaths worldwide. With no currently approved treatments, novel therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. All coronaviruses encode a highly conserved macrodomain (Mac1) that binds to and removes ADP-ribose adducts from proteins in a dynamic posttranslational process that is increasingly being recognized as an important factor that regulates viral infection. The macrodomain is essential for CoV pathogenesis and may be a novel therapeutic target. Thus, understanding its biochemistry and enzyme activity are critical first steps for these efforts. Here, we report the crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 Mac1 in complex with ADP-ribose and describe its ADP-ribose binding and hydrolysis activities in direct comparison to those of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV Mac1 proteins. These results are an important first step for the design and testing of potential therapies targeting this unique protein domain.


Subject(s)
N-Glycosyl Hydrolases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose/chemistry , Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose/metabolism , Amino Acid Sequence , Coronavirus/chemistry , Coronavirus/enzymology , Coronavirus/metabolism , Crystallography, X-Ray , Humans , Hydrolysis , Kinetics , N-Glycosyl Hydrolases/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry
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