Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 26
Filter
1.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 6241, 2022 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795682

ABSTRACT

Recently published clinical data from COVID-19 patients indicated that statin therapy is associated with a better clinical outcome and a significant reduction in the risk of mortality. In this study by computational analysis, we have aimed to predict the possible mechanism of the statin group of drugs by which they can inhibit SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis. Blind docking of the critical structural and functional proteins of SARS-CoV-2 like RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, M-protease of 3-CL-Pro, Helicase, and the Spike proteins ( wild type and mutants from different VOCs) were performed using the Schrodinger docking tool. We observed that fluvastatin and pitavastatin showed fair, binding affinities to RNA polymerase and 3-CL-Pro, whereas fluvastatin showed the strongest binding affinity to the helicase. Fluvastatin also showed the highest affinity for the SpikeDelta and a fair docking score for other spike variants. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulation confirmed the formation of a stable drug-protein complex between Fluvastatin and target proteins. Thus our study shows that of all the statins, fluvastatin can bind to multiple target proteins of SARS-CoV-2, including the spike-mutant proteins. This property might contribute to the potent antiviral efficacy of this drug.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Fluvastatin/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 16(5): 102484, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783291

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: To assess the impact of pre-admission renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor (RAASi) and statin use on mortality following COVID-19 hospitalization in adults with pre-existing diabetes. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of adults with diabetes admitted to ninety-nine participating hospitals in the United Kingdom, France and Spain during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Logistic regression models adjusted for demographic factors and comorbidity were used to describe associations with mortality in hospital or within 28 days of admission and individual or combined RAASi and statin therapy prescription followed by a country level meta-analysis. RESULTS: Complete data were available for 3474 (42.6%) individuals. Prescribing patterns varied by country: 25-50% neither RAASi nor statin therapy, 14-36% both RAASi and statin therapy, 9-24% RAASi therapy alone, 12-36% statin alone. Overall, 20-37% of patients died within 28 days. Meta-analysis found no evidence of an association between mortality and prescription of RAASi therapy (OR 1.09, CI 0.78-1.52 (I2 22.2%)), statin (OR 0.97, CI 0.59-1.61 (I2 72.9%)) or both (OR 1.14, CI 0.67-1.92 (I2 78.3%)) compared to those prescribed neither drug class. CONCLUSIONS: This large multicentre, multinational study found no evidence of an association between mortality from COVID-19 infection in people with diabetes and use of either RAASi, statin or combination therapy. This provides reassurance that clinicians should not change their RAASi and statin therapy prescribing practice in people with diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Hyperkalemia , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Adult , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hyperkalemia/complications , Hyperkalemia/drug therapy , Hyperkalemia/epidemiology , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renin-Angiotensin System , Retrospective Studies
3.
Biochem Pharmacol ; 197: 114909, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616378

ABSTRACT

Vascular endothelial cells are major participants in and regulators of immune responses and inflammation. Vascular endotheliitis is regarded as a host immune-inflammatory response of the endothelium forming the inner surface of blood vessels in association with a direct consequence of infectious pathogen invasion. Vascular endotheliitis and consequent endothelial dysfunction can be a principle determinant of microvascular failure, which would favor impaired perfusion, tissue hypoxia, and subsequent organ failure. Emerging evidence suggests the role of vascular endotheliitis in the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its related complications. Thus, once initiated, vascular endotheliitis and resultant cytokine storm cause systemic hyperinflammation and a thrombotic phenomenon in COVID-19, leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome and widespread organ damage. Vascular endotheliitis also appears to be a contributory factor to vasculopathy and coagulopathy in sepsis that is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated response of the host to infection. Therefore, protecting endothelial cells and reversing vascular endotheliitis may be a leading therapeutic goal for these diseases associated with vascular endotheliitis. In this review, we outline the etiological and pathogenic importance of vascular endotheliitis in infection-related inflammatory diseases, including COVID-19, and possible mechanisms leading to vascular endotheliitis. We also discuss pharmacological agents which may be now considered as potential endotheliitis-based treatment modalities for those diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Endothelium, Vascular/pathology , Vascular Diseases/pathology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/immunology , Endothelium, Vascular/drug effects , Endothelium, Vascular/immunology , Glucocorticoids/pharmacology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/etiology , Sepsis/immunology , Sepsis/pathology , Vascular Diseases/drug therapy , Vascular Diseases/etiology , Vascular Diseases/immunology
4.
Mol Cell Biochem ; 477(3): 711-726, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616202

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus pandemic has emerged as one of the significant medical-health challenges of the current century. The World Health Organization has named this new virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Since the first detection of SARS-CoV-2 in November 2019 in Wuhan, China, physicians, researchers, and others have made it their top priority to find drugs and cures that can effectively treat patients and reduce mortality rates. The symptoms of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) include fever, dry cough, body aches, and anosmia. Various therapeutic compounds have been investigated and applied to mitigate the symptoms in COVID-19 patients and cure the disease. Degenerative virus analyses of the infection incidence and COVID-19 have demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 penetrates the pulmonary alveoli's endothelial cells through Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors on the membrane, stimulates various signaling pathways and causes excessive secretion of cytokines. The continuous triggering of the innate and acquired immune system, as well as the overproduction of pro-inflammatory factors, cause a severe condition in the COVID-19 patients, which is called "cytokine storm". It can lead to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in critical patients. Severe and critical COVID-19 cases demand oxygen therapy and mechanical ventilator support. Various drugs, including immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents (e.g., monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and interleukin antagonists) have been utilized in clinical trials. However, the studies and clinical trials have documented diverging findings, which seem to be due to the differences in these drugs' possible mechanisms of action. These drugs' mechanism of action generally includes suppressing or modulating the immune system, preventing the development of cytokine storm via various signaling pathways, and enhancing the blood vessels' diameter in the lungs. In this review article, multiple medications from different drug families are discussed, and their possible mechanisms of action are also described.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , /pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Azetidines/immunology , Azetidines/pharmacology , COVID-19/etiology , Dexamethasone/immunology , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Famotidine/immunology , Famotidine/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/immunology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Infliximab/immunology , Infliximab/pharmacology , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/immunology , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/pharmacology , Melatonin/immunology , Melatonin/pharmacology , Purines/immunology , Purines/pharmacology , Pyrazoles/immunology , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Sulfonamides/immunology , Sulfonamides/pharmacology
5.
Lipids Health Dis ; 20(1): 141, 2021 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484314

ABSTRACT

The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus started in March 2020. The conclusions from numerous studies indicate that people with comorbidities, such as arterial hypertension, diabetes, obesity, underlying cardiovascular disease, are particularly vulnerable to the severe course of COVID-19. The available data also suggest that patients with dyslipidemia, the most common risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, are also at greater risk of severe course of COVID-19. On the other hand, it has been shown that COVID-19 infection has an influence on lipid profile leading to dyslipidemia, which might require appropriate treatment. Owing to antiviral, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and cardioprotective activity, statin therapy has been considered as valuable tool to improve COVID-19 outcomes. Numerous observational studies have shown potential beneficial effects of lipid-lowering treatment on the course of COVID-19 with significant improved prognosis and reduced mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Dyslipidemias/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II/epidemiology , Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II/metabolism , Lipid Metabolism , Prognosis
6.
Biomolecules ; 11(10)2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480575

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute myocarditis often progresses to heart failure because there is no effective, etiology-targeted therapy of this disease. Simvastatin has been shown to be cardioprotective by decreasing matrix metalloproteinases' (MMPs) activity. The study was designed to determine whether simvastatin inhibits MMPs activity, decreases the severity of inflammation and contractile dysfunction of the heart in experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM). METHODS: Simvastatin (3 or 30 mg/kg/day) was given to experimental rats with EAM by gastric gavage for 21 days. Then transthoracic echocardiography was performed, MMPs activity and troponin I level were determined and tissue samples were assessed under a light and transmission electron microscope. RESULTS: Hearts treated with simvastatin did not show left ventricular enlargement. As a result of EAM, there was an enhanced activation of MMP-9, which was significantly reduced in the high-dose simvastatin group compared to the low-dose group. It was accompanied by prevention of myofilaments degradation and reduction of severity of inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: The cardioprotective effects of simvastatin in the acute phase of EAM are, at least in part, due to its ability to decrease MMP-9 activity and subsequent decline in myofilaments degradation and suppression of inflammation. These effects were achieved in doses equivalent to therapeutic doses in humans.


Subject(s)
Inflammation/drug therapy , Metalloproteases/genetics , Myocarditis/drug therapy , Simvastatin/pharmacology , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Cardiotonic Agents/pharmacology , Echocardiography , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Inflammation/genetics , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Metalloproteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Models, Animal , Myocarditis/genetics , Myocarditis/immunology , Myocarditis/pathology , Rats , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/pathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/prevention & control
7.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 78(16): 1635-1654, 2021 10 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454219

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is associated with systemic inflammation, endothelial activation, and multiorgan manifestations. Lipid-modulating agents may be useful in treating patients with COVID-19. These agents may inhibit viral entry by lipid raft disruption or ameliorate the inflammatory response and endothelial activation. In addition, dyslipidemia with lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels portend worse outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Upon a systematic search, 40 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with lipid-modulating agents were identified, including 17 statin trials, 14 omega-3 fatty acids RCTs, 3 fibrate RCTs, 5 niacin RCTs, and 1 dalcetrapib RCT for the management or prevention of COVID-19. From these 40 RCTs, only 2 have reported preliminary results, and most others are ongoing. This paper summarizes the ongoing or completed RCTs of lipid-modulating agents in COVID-19 and the implications of these trials for patient management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/therapeutic use , Fibric Acids/therapeutic use , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Niacin/therapeutic use , Amides/pharmacology , Amides/therapeutic use , Esters/pharmacology , Esters/therapeutic use , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/pharmacology , Fibric Acids/pharmacology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Lipid Regulating Agents/pharmacology , Lipid Regulating Agents/therapeutic use , Niacin/pharmacology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Sulfhydryl Compounds/pharmacology , Sulfhydryl Compounds/therapeutic use
8.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 1901772, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although vaccine rollout for COVID-19 has been effective in some countries, there is still an urgent need to reduce disease transmission and severity. We recently carried out a meta-analysis and found that pre- and in-hospital use of statins may improve COVID-19 mortality outcomes. Here, we provide an updated meta-analysis in an attempt to validate these results and increase the statistical power of these potentially important findings. METHODS: The meta-analysis investigated the effect of observational and randomized clinical studies on intensive care unit (ICU) admission, tracheal intubation, and death outcomes in COVID-19 cases involving statin treatment, by searching the scientific literature up to April 23, 2021. Statistical analysis and random effect modeling were performed to assess the combined effects of the updated and previous findings on the outcome measures. Findings. The updated literature search led to the identification of 23 additional studies on statin use in COVID-19 patients. Analysis of the combined studies (n = 47; 3,238,508 subjects) showed no significant effect of statin treatment on ICU admission and all-cause mortality but a significant reduction in tracheal intubation (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.54-0.99, p = 0.04, n = 10 studies). The further analysis showed that death outcomes were significantly reduced in the patients who received statins during hospitalization (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.50-0.58, p < 0.001, n = 7 studies), with no such effect of statin therapy before hospital admission (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.82-1.37, p = 0.670, n = 29 studies). CONCLUSION: Taken together, this updated meta-analysis extends and confirms the findings of our previous study, suggesting that in-hospital statin use leads to significant reduction of all-cause mortality in COVID-19 cases. Considering these results, statin therapy during hospitalization, while indicated, should be recommended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospitalization/trends , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Intubation, Intratracheal/trends , COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death/trends , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Models, Statistical , Observational Studies as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
9.
Front Immunol ; 12: 716084, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430699

ABSTRACT

A binary model for the classification of chronic diseases has formerly been proposed. The model classifies chronic diseases as "high Treg" or "low Treg" diseases according to the extent of regulatory T cells (Treg) activity (frequency or function) observed. The present paper applies this model to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The model correctly predicts the efficacy or inefficacy of several immune-modulating drugs in the treatment of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease. It also correctly predicts the class of pathogens mostly associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. The clinical implications are the following: (a) any search for new immune-modulating drugs for the treatment of COVID-19 should exclude candidates that do not induce "high Treg" immune reaction or those that do not spare CD8+ T cells; (b) immune-modulating drugs, which are effective against SARS-CoV-2, may not be effective against any variant of the virus that does not induce "low Treg" reaction; (c) any immune-modulating drug, which is effective in treating COVID-19, will also alleviate most coinfections; and (d) severe COVID-19 patients should avoid contact with carriers of "low Treg" pathogens.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunomodulation/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Chronic Disease/classification , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sirolimus/therapeutic use
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298166

ABSTRACT

The virus responsible for the current COVID-19 pandemic is severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): a new virus with high infectivity and moderate mortality. The major clinical manifestation of COVID-19 is interstitial pneumonia, which may progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the disease causes a potent systemic hyperin-flammatory response, i.e., a cytokine storm or macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), which is associated with thrombotic complications. The complexity of the disease requires appropriate intensive treatment. One of promising treatment is statin administration, these being 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors that exert pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies indicate that statin therapy is associated with decreased mortality in COVID-19, which may be caused by direct and indirect mechanisms. According to literature data, statins can limit SARS-CoV-2 cell entry and replication by inhibiting the main protease (Mpro) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The cytokine storm can be ameliorated by lowering serum IL-6 levels; this can be achieved by inhibiting Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and modulating macrophage activity. Statins can also reduce the complications of COVID-19, such as thrombosis and pulmonary fibrosis, by reducing serum PAI-1 levels, attenuating TGF-ß and VEGF in lung tissue, and improving endothelial function. Despite these benefits, statin therapy may have side effects that should be considered, such as elevated creatinine kinase (CK), liver enzyme and serum glucose levels, which are already elevated in severe COVID-19 infection. The present study analyzes the latest findings regarding the benefits and limitations of statin therapy in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium/drug effects , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Lipid Metabolism/drug effects , Macrophage Activation/drug effects , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/drug therapy
11.
Prog Lipid Res ; 82: 101099, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201814

ABSTRACT

Despite encouraging progresses achieved in the management of viral diseases, efficient strategies to counteract infections are still required. The current global challenge highlighted the need to develop a rapid and cost-effective strategy to counteract the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in viral infections. Viruses can use the host lipid machinery to support their life cycle and to impair the host immune response. The altered expression of mevalonate pathway-related genes, induced by several viruses, assures survival and spread in host tissue. In some infections, statins, HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors, reduce cholesterol in the plasma membrane of permissive cells resulting in lower viral titers and failure to internalize the virus. Statins can also counteract viral infections through their immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. Beyond statins, interfering with the mevalonate pathway could have an adjuvant effect in therapies aimed at mitigating endothelial dysfunction and deregulated inflammation in viral infection. In this review we depicted the historical and current evidence highlighting how lipid homeostasis and mevalonate pathway targeting represents a valid approach to rapidly neutralize viruses, focusing our attention to their potential use as effective targets to hinder SARS-CoV-2 morbidity and mortality. Pros and cons of statins and Mevalonate-pathway inhibitors have been also dissected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Homeostasis , Lipid Metabolism , Mevalonic Acid/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Hypolipidemic Agents/pharmacology , Hypolipidemic Agents/therapeutic use , Mevalonic Acid/antagonists & inhibitors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
Biomolecules ; 11(4)2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196027

ABSTRACT

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) cleave extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, cytokines, and receptors to influence organ development, architecture, function, and the systemic and cell-specific responses to diseases and pharmacological drugs. Conversely, many diseases (such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, bacterial infections (tuberculosis), viral infections (COVID-19), and cancer), cholesterol-lowering drugs (such as statins), and tetracycline-class antibiotics (such as doxycycline) alter MMP activity through transcriptional, translational, and post-translational mechanisms. In this review, we summarize evidence that the aforementioned diseases and drugs exert significant epigenetic pressure on genes encoding MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, and factors that transcriptionally regulate the expression of MMPs. Our understanding of human pathologies associated with alterations in the proteolytic activity of MMPs must consider that these pathologies and their medicinal treatments may impose epigenetic pressure on the expression of MMP genes. Whether the epigenetic mechanisms affecting the activity of MMPs can be therapeutically targeted warrants further research.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Drug Discovery , Epigenesis, Genetic/drug effects , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Matrix Metalloproteinases/genetics , Tetracyclines/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/genetics , Bone Diseases/drug therapy , Bone Diseases/genetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Tetracyclines/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/genetics
13.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(3): 167-171, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171412

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 infection produce a prothrombotic state. This is initiated through multiple pathways and is finally aggravated by cross talks with cytokine storm and neutrophil, platelet, complement activation. All these combine towards the second week of illness to produce thrombosis in the lung capillaries surrounding the alveolus producing characteristic pulmonary dysfunction (PaO2/FiO2 > 300, normal or minimally increased lung compliance and very high d-dimer levels) and a high rate of peripheral venous thrombosis. International and many national guidelines have approached this state in different ways but all emphasized the need for management and prevention of widespread thrombosis. It is felt more aggressive and graded thrombosis prevention and management should be initiated early in the treatment. d-Dimer, neutrophil count, SaO2, fibrinogen levels should be used to control the hypercoagulability. Drugs like statins which have anti-inflammatory action as well as ability to reduce fibrinogen and other clotting factors should be used in the beginning along with antiplatelet drugs and progressively complement activation and neutrophil extracellular traps inhibitors, oral mucopolysaccharides, full-scale anticoagulation along with judicial use of fibrinolysis supporting drugs should be added. In the present review, we have evaluated the various studies and argued the rationality that the anticoagulation in this condition should be initiated early during the infection and should be increased in a graded manner depending on clinical and laboratory progression of the condition until a strong specific antiviral drug for coronavirus disease 2019 infection is available.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/physiopathology , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Extracellular Traps/drug effects , Fibrinolytic Agents/therapeutic use , Glycosaminoglycans/pharmacology , Glycosaminoglycans/therapeutic use , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Inflammation/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , Lung/physiopathology , Lung/virology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use
14.
Prog Cardiovasc Dis ; 67: 53-64, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091673

ABSTRACT

Myocarditis refers to the clinical and histological characteristics of a diverse range of inflammatory cellular pathophysiological conditions which result in cardiac dysfunction. Myocarditis is a major cause of mortality in individuals less than 40 years of age and accounts for approximately 20% of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Myocarditis contributes to dilated cardiomyopathy in 30% of patients and can progress to cardiac arrest, which has a poor prognosis of <40% survival over 10 years. Myocarditis has also been documented after infection with SARS-CoV-2. The most commonly used lipid-lowering therapies, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), decrease CVD-related morbidity and mortality. In addition to their lipid-lowering effects, increasing evidence supports the existence of several additional beneficial, 'pleiotropic' effects of statins. Recently, several studies have indicated that statins may attenuate myocarditis. Statins modify the lipid oxidation, inflammation, immunomodulation, and endothelial activity of the pathophysiology and have been recommended as adjuvant treatment. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms of action of statins and their effects on myocarditis, SARS-CoV-2 and CVD.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Myocarditis/drug therapy , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/chemistry , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Molecular Structure , Myocarditis/etiology
15.
J Diabetes Res ; 2021: 6666086, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) development in patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 have not been fully studied yet. In this study, we aimed to estimate the rate of AKI among the hospitalized population with COVID-19 and to identify the risk factors associated with AKI among patients with diabetes. Material and Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 254 patients (127 with diabetes and 127 without diabetes) who were admitted for COVID-19 to a tertiary hospital in Tehran, Iran, between February and May 2020. Clinical characteristics and outcomes, radiological findings, and laboratory data, including data on AKI, hematuria, and proteinuria were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: Of 254 patients, 142 (55.9%) were male and the mean (± SD) age was 65.7 years (±12.5). In total, 58 patients (22.8%) developed AKI during hospitalization, of whom 36 patients had diabetes (p = 0.04); most patients (74.1%) had stage 1 or 2 AKI. Also, 8 patients (13.8%) required renal replacement therapy (RRT) after developing AKI. Regardless of diabetes status, patients who developed AKI had significantly higher mortality rates compared with patients who did not develop AKI (p = 0.02). Hematuria and proteinuria were observed in 38.1% and 55% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that invasive mechanical ventilation, proteinuria, HBA1c level, history of cardiovascular disease, and use of statins were independent risk factors for AKI development in patients with diabetes. CONCLUSION: Results of this study showed that AKI develops in a considerable percentage of patients with COVID-19, especially in those with diabetes, and is significantly associated with mortality.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Hematuria/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Prevalence , Proteinuria/epidemiology , Renal Replacement Therapy/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
16.
Life Sci ; 269: 119099, 2021 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1036398

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Azithromycin is widely used broad spectrum antibiotic recently used in treatment protocol of COVID-19 for its antiviral and immunomodulatory effects combined with Hydroxychloroquine or alone. Rat models showed that Azithromycin produces oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis of myocardial tissue. Rosuvastatin, a synthetic statin, can attenuate myocardial ischemia with antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects. This study aims to evaluate the probable protective effect of Rosuvastatin against Azithromycin induced cardiotoxicity. MAIN METHOD: Twenty adult male albino rats were divided randomly into four groups, five rats each control, Azithromycin, Rosuvastatin, and Azithromycin +Rosuvastatin groups. Azithromycin 30 mg/kg/day and Rosuvastatin 2 mg/kg/day were administrated for two weeks by an intragastric tube. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, rats were anesthetized and the following measures were carried out; Electrocardiogram, Blood samples for Biochemical analysis of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and creatine phosphokinase (CPK). The animals sacrificed, hearts excised, apical part processed for H&E, immunohistochemical staining, and examined by light microscope. The remaining parts of the heart were collected for assessment of Malondialdehyde (MDA) and Reduced Glutathione (GSH). KEY FINDINGS: The results revealed that Rosuvastatin significantly ameliorates ECG changes, biochemical, and Oxidative stress markers alterations of Azithromycin. Histological evaluation from Azithromycin group showed marked areas of degeneration, myofibers disorganization, inflammatory infiltrate, and hemorrhage. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed significant increase in both Caspase 3 and Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) immune stain. Rosuvastatin treated group showed restoration of the cardiac muscle fibers in H&E and Immunohistochemical results. SIGNIFICANCE: We concluded that Rosuvastatin significantly ameliorates the toxic changes of Azithromycin on the heart.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Azithromycin/adverse effects , Cardiotoxicity/prevention & control , Rosuvastatin Calcium/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , Antioxidants/administration & dosage , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Azithromycin/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cardiotoxicity/etiology , Disease Models, Animal , Glutathione/metabolism , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Malondialdehyde/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Rosuvastatin Calcium/administration & dosage
17.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol ; 43(1): 37-50, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012741

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) that causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has infected millions of individuals and has claimed hundreds of thousands of human lives worldwide. Patients with underlying cardiovascular conditions are at high risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection, and COVID-19 patients have high incidence of cardiovascular complications such as acute cardiac injury, arrhythmias, heart failure, and thromboembolism. The disease has no approved proven effective therapy and hence repurposing of existing approved drugs has been considered as the fastest treatment approach. Statins have been shown to exhibit lipid lowering dependent and independent cardiovascular protective effects as well as favorable effects in various other pathophysiological states. These beneficial properties of statins are a result of their multiple pleotropic effects that include, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antithrombotic and antimicrobial properties. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of the mechanisms of the pleotropic effects of statins, the relevant pre-clinical and clinical data pertinent to their role in infections and acute lung injury, the possible cardiovascular benefits of statins in COVID-19, and the implications of the therapeutic potential of statins in COVID-19 disease. We conclude with the rationale for conducting randomized controlled trials of statins in COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/etiology
18.
Br J Pharmacol ; 177(21): 4873-4886, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998831

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has overwhelmed healthcare systems requiring the rapid development of treatments, at least, to reduce COVID-19 severity. Drug repurposing offers a fast track. Here, we discuss the potential beneficial effects of statins in COVID-19 patients based on evidence that they may target virus receptors, replication, degradation, and downstream responses in infected cells, addressing both basic research and epidemiological information. Briefly, statins could modulate virus entry, acting on the SARS-CoV-2 receptors, ACE2 and CD147, and/or lipid rafts engagement. Statins, by inducing autophagy activation, could regulate virus replication or degradation, exerting protective effects. The well-known anti-inflammatory properties of statins, by blocking several molecular mechanisms, including NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasomes, could limit the "cytokine storm" in severe COVID-19 patients which is linked to fatal outcome. Finally, statin moderation of coagulation response activation may also contribute to improving COVID-19 outcomes. LINKED ARTICLES: This article is part of a themed issue on The Pharmacology of COVID-19. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v177.21/issuetoc.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Animals , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/immunology , Drug Repositioning , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization/drug effects
19.
Pharmacol Ther ; 221: 107750, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-951072

ABSTRACT

The recent emergence of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) as a global pandemic has prompted scientists to address an urgent need for defining mechanisms of disease pathology and treatment. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent for COVID-19, employs angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its primary target for cell surface attachment and likely entry into the host cell. Thus, understanding factors that may regulate the expression and function of ACE2 in the healthy and diseased body is critical for clinical intervention. Over 66% of all adults in the United States are currently using a prescription drug and while earlier findings have focused on possible upregulation of ACE2 expression through the use of renin angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors, mounting evidence suggests that various other widely administered drugs used in the treatment of hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemias, coagulation disorders, and pulmonary disease may also present a varied risk for COVID-19. Specifically, we summarize mechanisms on how heparin, statins, steroids and phytochemicals, besides their established therapeutic effects, may also interfere with SARS-CoV-2 viral entry into cells. We also describe evidence on the effect of several vitamins, phytochemicals, and naturally occurring compounds on ACE2 expression and activity in various tissues and disease models. This comprehensive review aims to provide a timely compendium on the potential impact of commonly prescribed drugs and pharmacologically active compounds on COVID-19 pathology and risk through regulation of ACE2 and RAS signaling.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/antagonists & inhibitors , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/enzymology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/enzymology , Steroids/pharmacology , Steroids/therapeutic use
20.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 14(6): 2063-2067, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893727

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Inflammation-mediated tissue injury is the major mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-2019), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2). Statins have well-established anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and immuno-modulatory effects. They may also influence viral entry into human cells. METHODS: A literature search was done using PubMed and Google search engines to prepare a narrative review on this topic. RESULTS: Statins interact with several different signaling pathways to exert their anti-inflammatory and vasculoprotective effects. They also variably affect cholesterol content of cell membranes and interfere with certain coronavirus enzymes involved in receptor-binding. Both these actions may influence SARS-CoV-2 entry into human cells. Statins also upregulate expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptors on cell surfaces which may promote viral entry into the cells but at the same time, may minimize tissue injury through production of angiotensin [1-7]. The net impact of these different effects on COVID-19 pathogenesis is not clear. However, the retrospective clinical studies have shown that statin use is potentially associated with lower risk of developing severe illness and mortality and a faster time to recovery in patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Early observations suggest beneficial effect of statin use on the clinical outcomes in COVID-19. Prospective randomized studies as well as well-designed laboratory studies are required to confirm these observations and to elucidate the mechanisms of such benefits, if proven.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Inflammation Mediators/antagonists & inhibitors , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , India/epidemiology , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Retrospective Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL