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1.
Cells ; 11(6)2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731953

ABSTRACT

The infection with SARS-CoV-2 impairs the glucose-insulin axis and this contributes to oxidative (OS) and nitrosative (NSS) stress. Here, we evaluated changes in glucose metabolism that could promote the loss of redox homeostasis in COVID-19 patients. This was comparative cohort and analytical study that compared COVID-19 patients and healthy subjects. The study population consisted of 61 COVID-19 patients with and without comorbidities and 25 healthy subjects (HS). In all subjects the plasma glucose, insulin, 8-isoprostane, Vitamin D, H2S and 3-nitrotyrosine were determined by ELISA. The nitrites (NO2-), lipid-peroxidation (LPO), total-antioxidant-capacity (TAC), thiols, glutathione (GSH) and selenium (Se) were determined by spectrophotometry. The glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR (p < 0.001), 8-isoprostanes, 3-nitrotyrosine (p < 0.001) and LPO were increased (p = 0.02) while Vitamin D (p = 0.01), H2S, thiols, TAC, GSH and Se (p < 0.001) decreased in COVID-19 patients in comparison to HS. The SARS-CoV-2 infection resulted in alterations in the glucose-insulin axis that led to hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and IR in patients with and without comorbidities. These alterations increase OS and NSS reflected in increases or decreases in some oxidative markers in plasma with major impact or fatal consequences in patients that course with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, subjects without comorbidities could have long-term alterations in the redox homeostasis after infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperglycemia , Insulin Resistance , Selenium , Antioxidants/metabolism , Glucose , Glutathione/metabolism , Homeostasis , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Insulin/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress , SARS-CoV-2 , Sulfhydryl Compounds , Vitamin D , Vitamins
2.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord ; 23(2): 205-213, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1718864

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus and/or hyperglycemia are highly prevalent medical conditions in patients hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and are associated with adverse outcomes. In addition, COVID-19 itself can provoke fluctuating and high glucose levels that can be difficult to manage upon hospitalization. Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 are at high risk of malnutrition due to an increase in nutritional requirements and a severe acute inflammatory response. The management of patients with diabetes/hyperglycemia and COVID-19 is challenging and requires a specific nutritional approach, the purpose of which is to fulfill the nutritional requirements while maintaining an optimal glycemic control. In this study, an expert group of nutritional endocrinologists carried out a qualitative literature review and provided recommendations based on evidence and guidelines, when available, or on their own experience. The optimal care based on these recommendations was compared with the routine bedside care as reported by a panel of physicians (mainly, endocrinologists, geriatricians, and internists) treating patients with diabetes/hyperglycemia and COVID-19 in their daily practice. Early screening and diagnosis, a diabetes-specific therapeutic approach, and a close malnutrition monitoring are essential to improve the clinical outcomes of these patients. In conclusion, the proposed recommendations are intended to provide a useful guide on the clinical management of malnutrition in patients with COVID-19 and diabetes/hyperglycemia, in order to improve their outcomes and accelerate their recovery. The comparison of the recommended optimal care with routine clinical practice could aid to identify gaps in knowledge, implementation difficulties, and areas for improvement in the management of malnutrition in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hyperglycemia , Malnutrition , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/therapy , Malnutrition/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 536, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621272

ABSTRACT

To evaluate the effect of the combination of linagliptin and insulin on metabolic control and prognosis in hospitalized patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and hyperglycemia. A parallel double-blind randomized clinical trial including hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and hyperglycemia, randomized to receive 5 mg linagliptin + insulin (LI group) or insulin alone (I group) was performed. The main outcomes were the need for assisted mechanical ventilation and glucose levels during hospitalization. Subjects were screened for eligibility at hospital admission if they were not with assisted mechanical ventilation and presented hyperglycemia, and a total of 73 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and hyperglycemia were randomized to the LI group (n = 35) or I group (n = 38). The average hospital stay was 12 ± 1 vs 10 ± 1 days for the I and LI groups, respectively (p = 0.343). There were no baseline clinical differences between the study groups, but the percentage of males was higher in the LI group (26 vs 18, p = 0.030). The improvements in fasting and postprandial glucose levels were better in the LI group that the I group (122 ± 7 vs 149 ± 10, p = 0.033; and 137 ± 7 vs 173 ± 12, p = 0.017, respectively), and insulin requirements tended to be lower in the LI group than the I group. Three patients in the LI group and 12 in the I group required assisted mechanical ventilation (HR 0.258, CI 95% 0.092-0.719, p = 0.009); 2 patients in the LI group and 6 in the I group died after a follow-up of 30 days (p = 0.139). No major side effects were observed. The combination of linagliptin and insulin in hospitalized patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection and hyperglycemia reduced the relative risk of assisted mechanical ventilation by 74% and improved better pre and postprandial glucose levels with lower insulin requirements, and no higher risk of hypoglycemia.This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT04542213 on 09/03/2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Insulin/therapeutic use , Linagliptin/therapeutic use , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(22): 7144-7150, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1552081

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the association between hyperglycemia and body mass index (BMI), along with other associated comorbidities in hospitalized COVID-19 patients among the Indonesian population. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study conducted at Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung between March 1, 2020, and August 30, 2020. Data were analyzed using the chi-square test for categorical data and unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney alternative test for numerical data using SPSS version 24.0 (IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 24.0. IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) and GraphPad Prism version 7.0 for Windows. RESULTS: A total of 142 hospitalized COVID-19 patients were documented between March and August 2020 at the Hasan Sadikin Hospital. Among the 142 patients, 116 (81.7%) survived, while 26 (18.3%) died. Sex, age, BMI, number of comorbidities, heart rate, respiratory rate, peripheral oxygen saturation, platelet count, random blood glucose (RBG), and length of stay (LOS) were significantly associated with mortality. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that admission RBG levels > 140 mg/dl were independently associated with an increased risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.1-17.5, p = 0.043), while BMI > 25 kg/m2 was significantly associated with reduced mortality (OR, 0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.88, p = 0.033). CONCLUSIONS: Admission hyperglycemia, indicated by an increase in RBG levels >140 mg/dL, is independently associated with an increased risk of mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, while obesity (BMI >25 kg/m2) might have protective properties against the risk of death.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hyperglycemia/complications , Obesity/complications , Adult , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Heart Rate/physiology , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Count , Respiratory Rate/physiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
5.
Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab ; 322(1): E44-E53, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518165

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a pandemic emerged due to a new coronavirus that imposed various uncertainties and discoveries. It has been reported that diabetes is a risk factor for worst outcomes of COVID-19 and also that SARS-CoV-2 infection was correlated with the occurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in patients. The aim of this work is to discuss this correlation emphasizing the main case reports from 2020 while exploring the management of DKA during the course of COVID-19. Web of Science, PubMed, and Scopus databases were searched using two sets of Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) search terms or Title/Abstract words: Coronavirus Infections (Coronavirus Infections, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, COVID-19) and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (Diabetic Ketoacidosis, Diabetic Acidosis, Diabetic Ketosis). There is a clear correlation between COVID-19 and DKA. The SARS-Cov-2 infection may precipitate both a hyperglycemic state and ketoacidosis occurrence in patients with diabetes and nondiabetic patients, which may lead to fatal outcomes. DKA in patients with COVID-19 may increase risk and worse outcomes. Hence, the SARS-Cov-2 infection presents a new perspective toward the management of glycemia and acidosis in patients with diabetes and nondiabetic patients, highlighting the need for rapid interventions to minimize the complications from COVID-19 while reducing its spreading.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/complications , Blood Glucose/analysis , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring , COVID-19/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/drug therapy , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/metabolism , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin/administration & dosage , Insulin/therapeutic use , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Telemedicine
6.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood) ; 247(3): 200-206, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477209

ABSTRACT

An observational study was conducted in Ukraine to determine the independent mortality risks among adult inpatients with COVID-19. The results of treatment of COVID-19 inpatients (n = 367) are presented, and waist circumference (WC) was measured. Logistic regression analysis was applied to evaluate the effects of factors on the risk of mortality. Odds ratios and 95% CIs for the association were calculated. One hundred and three of 367 subjects had fasting plasma glucose level that met the diabetes mellitus criteria (≥7.0 mmol/L), in 53 patients, diabetes mellitus was previously known. Two hundred and eleven patients did not have diabetes or hyperglycemia. Diabetes mellitus/hyperglycemia odds ratio 2.5 (CI 1.0-6.1), p = 0.045 loses statistical significance after standardization by age, waist circumference or fasting plasma glucose. No effect on gender, body mass index-determined obesity, or hypertension was found. The fasting plasma glucose (>8.5 mmol/L), age (≥61 years), and waist circumference (>105 cm) categories were associated with ORs 6.34 (CI 2.60-15.4); 4.12 (CI 1.37-12.4); 8.93 (CI 3.26-24.5), respectively. The optimal model of mortality risk with AUC 0.86 (CI 0.81-0.91) included the diabetes/heperglycemia and age categories as well as waist circumference as a continued variable. Waist circumference is an independent risk factor for mortality of inpatients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , Hyperglycemia , Waist Circumference , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Abdominal/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Treatment Outcome , Ukraine/epidemiology
7.
Postgrad Med ; 133(8): 912-919, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450320

ABSTRACT

Uncontrolled diabetes and/or hyperglycemia is associated with severe COVID-19 disease and increased mortality. It is now known that poor glucose control before hospital admission can be associated with a high risk of in-hospital death. By achieving and maintaining glycemic control, primary care physicians (PCPs) play a critical role in limiting this potentially devastating outcome. Further, despite the hope that mass vaccination will help control the pandemic, genetic variants of the virus are causing surges in some countries. As such, PCPs will treat an increasing number of patients with diabetes who have symptoms of post-COVID-19 infection, or even have new-onset type 2 diabetes as a result of COVID-19 infection. However, much of the literature published focuses on the effects of COVID-19 in hospitalized patients, with few publications providing information and advice to those caring for people with diabetes in the primary care setting. This manuscript reviews the current knowledge of the risk and outcomes of individuals with diabetes who are infected with COVID-19 and provides information for PCPs on the importance of glucose control, appropriate treatment, and use of telemedicine and online prescription delivery systems to limit the potentially devastating effects of COVID-19 in people with hyperglycemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 649405, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295631

ABSTRACT

The finding that high-dose dexamethasone improves survival in those requiring critical care due to COVID-19 will mean much greater usage of glucocorticoids in the subsequent waves of coronavirus infection. Furthermore, the consistent finding of adverse outcomes from COVID-19 in individuals with obesity, hypertension and diabetes has focussed attention on the metabolic dysfunction that may arise with critical illness. The SARS coronavirus itself may promote relative insulin deficiency, ketogenesis and hyperglycaemia in susceptible individuals. In conjunction with prolonged critical care, these components will promote a catabolic state. Insulin infusion is the mainstay of therapy for treatment of hyperglycaemia in acute illness but what is the effect of insulin on the admixture of glucocorticoids and COVID-19? This article reviews the evidence for the effect of insulin on clinical outcomes and intermediary metabolism in critical illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Insulin/therapeutic use , Metabolic Diseases/chemically induced , Metabolic Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/complications , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness/therapy , Dexamethasone/adverse effects , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/drug therapy , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Metabolic Diseases/etiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/drug therapy , Obesity/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Treatment Outcome
10.
FEBS J ; 288(17): 5042-5054, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295003

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the vulnerability of people with diabetes mellitus (DM) to respiratory viral infections. Despite the short history of COVID-19, various studies have shown that patients with DM are more likely to have increased hospitalisation and mortality rates as compared to patients without. At present, the mechanisms underlying this susceptibility are unclear. However, prior studies show that the course of COVID-19 disease is linked to the efficacy of the host's T-cell responses. Healthy individuals who can elicit a robust T-cell response are more likely to limit the severity of COVID-19. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that an impaired T-cell response in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drives the severity of COVID-19 in this patient population. While there is currently a limited amount of information that specifically addresses T-cell responses in COVID-19 patients with T2DM, there is a wealth of evidence from other infectious diseases that T-cell immunity is impaired in patients with T2DM. The reasons for this are likely multifactorial, including the presence of hyperglycaemia, glycaemic variability and metformin use. This review emphasises the need for further research into T-cell responses of COVID-19 patients with T2DM in order to better inform our response to COVID-19 and future disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Hyperglycemia/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/pathology , Hyperglycemia/virology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , T-Lymphocytes/virology
11.
Nat Metab ; 3(6): 774-785, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243313

ABSTRACT

Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are reported to have a greater prevalence of hyperglycaemia. Cytokine release as a consequence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection may precipitate the onset of metabolic alterations by affecting glucose homeostasis. Here we describe abnormalities in glycometabolic control, insulin resistance and beta cell function in patients with COVID-19 without any pre-existing history or diagnosis of diabetes, and document glycaemic abnormalities in recovered patients 2 months after onset of disease. In a cohort of 551 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 in Italy, we found that 46% of patients were hyperglycaemic, whereas 27% were normoglycaemic. Using clinical assays and continuous glucose monitoring in a subset of patients, we detected altered glycometabolic control, with insulin resistance and an abnormal cytokine profile, even in normoglycaemic patients. Glycaemic abnormalities can be detected for at least 2 months in patients who recovered from COVID-19. Our data demonstrate that COVID-19 is associated with aberrant glycometabolic control, which can persist even after recovery, suggesting that further investigation of metabolic abnormalities in the context of long COVID is warranted.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Hyperglycemia/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Insulin Resistance , Insulin-Secreting Cells/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 596518, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156116

ABSTRACT

Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT04365634. Context: Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased severity and mortality of disease in COVID-19 pneumonia. So far the effect of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) or hyperglycemia on the immune system among COVID-19 disease has remained unclear. Objective: We aim to explore the clinical and immunological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among COVID-19 patients. Design and Methods: In this retrospective study, the clinical and immunological characteristics of 306 hospitalized confirmed COVID-19 patients (including 129 diabetic and 177 non-diabetic patients) were analyzed. The serum concentrations of laboratory parameters including cytokines and numbers of immune cells were measured and compared between diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Results: Compared with non-diabetic group, diabetic cases more frequently had lymphopenia and hyperglycemia, with higher levels of urea nitrogen, myoglobin, D-dimer and ferritin. Diabetic cases indicated the obviously elevated mortality and the higher levels of cytokines IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α, as well as the distinctly reduced Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios compared with non-diabetic cases. The longitudinal assays showed that compared to that at week 1, the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly elevated at week 2 after admission in non-survivors of diabetic cases, whereas there were greatly reductions from week 1 to week 2 in survivors of diabetic cases. Compared with survival diabetic patients, non-survival diabetic cases displayed distinct higher serum concentrations of IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, and lower Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios at week 2. Samples from a subset of participants were evaluated by flow cytometry for the immune cells. The counts of peripheral total T lymphocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells were markedly lower in diabetic cases than in non-diabetic cases. The non-survivors showed the markedly declined counts of CD8+ T cells and NK cells than survivors. Conclusion: The elevated cytokines, imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines ratios and reduced of peripheral numbers of CD8+ T cells and NK cells might contribute to the pathogenic mechanisms of high mortality of COVID-19 patients with T2DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Adult , Aged , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , China/epidemiology , Cytokines/analysis , Cytokines/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/immunology , Hyperglycemia/mortality , Immune System/metabolism , Immune System/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/complications , Lymphopenia/immunology , Lymphopenia/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th1 Cells/pathology , Th2 Cells/pathology
13.
Mediators Inflamm ; 2021: 8812304, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145381

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a considerable global public health threat. This study sought to investigate whether blood glucose (BG) levels or comorbid diabetes are associated with inflammatory status and disease severity in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, the clinical and biochemical characteristics of COVID-19 patients with or without diabetes were compared. The relationship among severity of COVID-19, inflammatory status, and diabetes or hyperglycemia was analyzed. The severity of COVID-19 in all patients was determined according to the diagnostic and treatment guidelines issued by the Chinese National Health Committee (7th edition). RESULTS: Four hundred and sixty-one patients were enrolled in our study, and 71.58% of patients with diabetes and 13.03% of patients without diabetes had hyperglycemia. Compared with patients without diabetes (n = 366), patients with diabetes (n = 95) had a higher leucocyte count, neutrophil count, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). There was no association between severity of COVID-19 and known diabetes adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), known hypertension, and coronary heart disease. The leucocyte count, NLR, and C-reactive protein (CRP) level increased with increasing BG level. Hyperglycemia was an independent predictor of critical (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.72-9.30) or severe (OR 3.55, 95% CI 1.47-8.58) COVID-19, and of increased inflammatory levels (high leucocyte count (OR 4.26, 95% CI 1.65-10.97), NLR (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.24-6.10), and CRP level (OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.19-5.23)), after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, severity of illness, and known diabetes. CONCLUSION: Hyperglycemia was positively correlated with higher inflammation levels and more severe illness, and it is a risk factor for the increased severity of COVID-19. The initial measurement of plasma glucose levels after hospitalization may help identify a subset of patients who are predisposed to a worse clinical course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Blood Sedimentation , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Diabetes Complications/blood , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Front Public Health ; 9: 559595, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119561

ABSTRACT

Uncontrolled diabetes results in several metabolic alterations including hyperglycemia. Indeed, several preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that this condition may induce susceptibility and the development of more aggressive infectious diseases, especially those caused by some bacteria (including Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, among others) and viruses [such as coronavirus 2 (CoV2), Influenza A virus, Hepatitis B, etc.]. Although the precise mechanisms that link glycemia to the exacerbated infections remain elusive, hyperglycemia is known to induce a wide array of changes in the immune system activity, including alterations in: (i) the microenvironment of immune cells (e.g., pH, blood viscosity and other biochemical parameters); (ii) the supply of energy to infectious bacteria; (iii) the inflammatory response; and (iv) oxidative stress as a result of bacterial proliferative metabolism. Consistent with this evidence, some bacterial infections are typical (and/or have a worse prognosis) in patients with hypercaloric diets and a stressful lifestyle (conditions that promote hyperglycemic episodes). On this basis, the present review is particularly focused on: (i) the role of diabetes in the development of some bacterial and viral infections by analyzing preclinical and clinical findings; (ii) discussing the possible mechanisms by which hyperglycemia may increase the susceptibility for developing infections; and (iii) further understanding the impact of hyperglycemia on the immune system.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/etiology , COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Complications/immunology , Diabetes Complications/physiopathology , Disease Susceptibility , Hyperglycemia/complications , Virus Diseases/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
15.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 64, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102335

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to identify high-risk factors for disease progression and fatality for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: We enrolled 2433 COVID-19 patients and used LASSO regression and multivariable cause-specific Cox proportional hazard models to identify the risk factors for disease progression and fatality. RESULTS: The median time for progression from mild-to-moderate, moderate-to-severe, severe-to-critical, and critical-to-death were 3.0 (interquartile range: 1.8-5.5), 3.0 (1.0-7.0), 3.0 (1.0-8.0), and 6.5 (4.0-16.3) days, respectively. Among 1,758 mild or moderate patients at admission, 474 (27.0%) progressed to a severe or critical stage. Age above 60 years, elevated levels of blood glucose, respiratory rate, fever, chest tightness, c-reaction protein, lactate dehydrogenase, direct bilirubin, and low albumin and lymphocyte count were significant risk factors for progression. Of 675 severe or critical patients at admission, 41 (6.1%) died. Age above 74 years, elevated levels of blood glucose, fibrinogen and creatine kinase-MB, and low plateleta count were significant risk factors for fatality. Patients with elevated blood glucose level were 58% more likely to progress and 3.22 times more likely to die of COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Older age, elevated glucose level, and clinical indicators related to systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organ failures, predict both the disease progression and the fatality of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Glucose/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Disease Progression , Hyperglycemia/blood , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Bilirubin/blood , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , China/epidemiology , Critical Illness , Female , Fever/virology , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin/metabolism , Time Factors
16.
Cell Metab ; 33(2): 258-269.e3, 2021 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064967

ABSTRACT

Corticosteroid therapy is now recommended as a treatment in patients with severe COVID-19. But one key question is how to objectively identify severely ill patients who may benefit from such therapy. Here, we assigned 12,862 COVID-19 cases from 21 hospitals in Hubei Province equally to a training and a validation cohort. We found that a neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) > 6.11 at admission discriminated a higher risk for mortality. Importantly, however, corticosteroid treatment in such individuals was associated with a lower risk of 60-day all-cause mortality. Conversely, in individuals with an NLR ≤ 6.11 or with type 2 diabetes, corticosteroid treatment was not associated with reduced mortality, but rather increased risks of hyperglycemia and infections. These results show that in the studied cohort corticosteroid treatment is associated with beneficial outcomes in a subset of COVID-19 patients who are non-diabetic and with severe symptoms as defined by NLR.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lymphocytes/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/pathology , Length of Stay , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate , Treatment Outcome
17.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 35-51, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061059

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in 2019, it is gaining worldwide attention at the moment. Apart from respiratory manifestations, neurological dysfunction in COVID-19 patients, especially the occurrence of cerebrovascular diseases (CVD), has been intensively investigated. In this review, the effects of COVID-19 infection on CVD were summarized as follows: (I) angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) may be involved in the attack on vascular endothelial cells by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), leading to endothelial damage and increased subintimal inflammation, which are followed by hemorrhage or thrombosis; (II) SARS-CoV-2 could alter the expression/activity of ACE2, consequently resulting in the disruption of renin-angiotensin system which is associated with the occurrence and progression of atherosclerosis; (III) upregulation of neutrophil extracellular traps has been detected in COVID-19 patients, which is closely associated with immunothrombosis; (IV) the inflammatory cascade induced by SARS-CoV-2 often leads to hypercoagulability and promotes the formation and progress of atherosclerosis; (V) antiphospholipid antibodies are also detected in plasma of some severe cases, which aggravate the thrombosis through the formation of immune complexes; (VI) hyperglycemia in COVID-19 patients may trigger CVD by increasing oxidative stress and blood viscosity; (VII) the COVID-19 outbreak is a global emergency and causes psychological stress, which could be a potential risk factor of CVD as coagulation, and fibrinolysis may be affected. In this review, we aimed to further our understanding of CVD-associated COVID-19 infection, which could improve the therapeutic outcomes of patients. Personalized treatments should be offered to COVID-19 patients at greater risk for stroke in future clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/complications , COVID-19/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Hemorrhage/complications , Hyperglycemia/complications , Stroke/complications , Thrombosis/complications , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Atherosclerosis/diagnosis , Atherosclerosis/drug therapy , Atherosclerosis/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Agents/therapeutic use , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/diagnosis , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Extracellular Traps/drug effects , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Hemorrhage/diagnosis , Hemorrhage/drug therapy , Hemorrhage/virology , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/drug therapy , Hyperglycemia/virology , Inflammation , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/virology , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/virology
18.
J Diabetes ; 13(3): 253-260, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We undertook this study to evaluate the association between hyperglycemia and outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We conducted a multicenter retrospective study involving all adults with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU between March and May 2020. Patients were divided into normoglycemic (average blood glucose <140 mg/dL) and hyperglycemic (average blood glucose ≥140 mg/dL) groups. Outcomes such as mortality, need and duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of hospital and ICU stays were measured. RESULTS: Among 495 patients, 58.4% were male with a median age of 68 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 58.00-77.00), and baseline average blood glucose was 186.6 (SD ± 130.8). Preexisting diabetes was present in 35.8% of the studied cohort. Combined ICU and hospital mortality rates were 23.8%; mortality and mechanical ventilation rates were significantly higher in the hyperglycemic group with 31.4% vs 16.6% (P = .001) and 50.0% vs 37.2% (P = .004), respectively. Age above 60 years (hazard ratio [HR] 3.21; 95% CI 1.78, 5.78) and hyperglycemia (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.14, 2.82) were the only significant predictors of in-hospital mortality. Increased risk for hyperglycemia was found in patients with steroid use (odds ratio [OR] 1.521; 95% CI 1.054, 2.194), triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.109, 2.379), and African American race (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.65, 0.95). CONCLUSIONS: Hyperglycemia in patients with COVID-19 is significantly associated with a prolonged ICU length of stay, higher need of mechanical ventilation, and increased risk of mortality in the critical care setting. Tighter blood glucose control (≤140 mg/dL) might improve outcomes in COVID-19 critically ill patients; evidence from ongoing clinical trials is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Hyperglycemia/complications , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Glucose/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Inpatients , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
19.
Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes ; 28(1): 35-42, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052225

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a major comorbidity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) but less is known about COVID-19 and type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Thus, our goal was to review the literature on COVID and T1DM. RECENT FINDINGS: We identified 21 reports focusing on COVID-19 infections among patients with preexisting T1DM (n = 7), incident T1DM presentations during the COVID-19 quarantine (n = 6), and outpatient management of T1DM during the COVID-19 quarantine (n = 8). These studies showed that patients with preexisting T1DM and COVID-19 infection often present with hyperglycemia and/or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Although the risk of in-hospital mortality may be increased, hospitalization rates among patients with T1DM mirror that of the general population. The numbers of patients presenting with incident T1DM during COVID-19 quarantine have remained stable, but cases with severe DKA may have increased. COVID-19 quarantine has also impacted outpatient T1DM management and studies examining changes in glycemic control have shown mixed results. SUMMARY: COVID-19 has important implications for patients with type 1 diabetes, but additional studies with larger numbers of patients and longer term follow-up are needed to confirm the early findings highlighted in this review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Comorbidity , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Diabet Med ; 38(3): e14509, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998859

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has continued to have a devastating impact on health worldwide. There has been a rapid evolution of evidence, establishing an increased risk of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes and concurrent COVID-19. The objective of this review is to explore the current evidence for inpatient assessment and management of diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic and highlight areas requiring further exploration. METHODS: A literature search of databases was conducted to November 2020 using variations on keywords SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, SARS, MERS and diabetes. Information relating to the impact of diabetes on severity of COVID-19 infection, the impact of COVID-19 infection on diabetes management and diabetes-related complications was integrated to create a narrative review. DISCUSSION: People with diabetes and COVID-19 are at an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. It is important that people with both known and previously unrecognised diabetes and COVID-19 be promptly identified and assessed during acute illness, with close monitoring for clinical deterioration or complications. People with diabetes may require titration or alteration of their glycaemic management due to the potential for worse outcomes with hyperglycaemia and COVID-19 infection. Comprehensive discharge planning is vital to optimise ongoing glycaemic management. CONCLUSION: Further understanding of the risk of adverse outcomes and optimisation of glycaemic management for people with diabetes during COVID-19 is required to improve outcomes. Increased glucose and ketone monitoring, substitution of insulin for some oral anti-hyperglycaemic medications and careful monitoring for complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Inpatients , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Glycemic Control/methods , Humans , Hyperglycemia/complications , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/prevention & control , Needs Assessment
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