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1.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(1): 137-144, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477604

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients and occurs in about 30% of patients with pneumonia. Hyponatremia has been associated with a worse outcome in several pathologic conditions The main objective of this study was to determine whether serum sodium alterations may be independent predictors of the outcome of hospitalized COVID-19 patients. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this observational study, data from 441 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted to a University Hospital were collected. After excluding 61 patients (no serum sodium at admission available, saline solution infusion before sodium assessment, transfer from another hospital), data from 380 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: 274 (72.1%) patients had normonatremia at admission, 87 (22.9%) patients had hyponatremia and 19 (5%) patients had hypernatremia. We found an inverse correlation between serum sodium and IL-6, whereas a direct correlation between serum sodium and PaO2/FiO2 ratio was observed. Patients with hyponatremia had a higher prevalence of non-invasive ventilation and ICU transfer than those with normonatremia or hypernatremia. Hyponatremia was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (2.7-fold increase vs normonatremia) and each mEq/L of serum sodium reduction was associated with a 14.4% increased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that serum sodium at admission may be considered as an early prognostic marker of disease severity in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sodium/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fluorocarbons/blood , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydrocarbons, Brominated/blood , Hypernatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS Virus
2.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(4): R103-R111, 2021 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348376

ABSTRACT

This review examines the prevalence, aetiology, pathophysiology, prognostic value, and investigation of dysnatraemia in hospitalised COVID-19 patients, taking into account all relevant studies published in PubMed and Cochrane Library studies until March 2021. Hyponatraemia is commonly observed in patients with bacterial pneumonia and is an independent predictor for excess mortality and morbidity. However, it remains unknown whether this association applies to coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Several studies reported a 20-35% prevalence for hyponatraemia and 2-5% for hypernatraemia in patients admitted with COVID-19. In addition, hyponatraemia on admission was a risk factor for progression to severe disease, being associated with an increased likelihood for the need for invasive mechanical ventilation, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.83-3.30. Hyponatraemia seems to be an independent risk factor for mortality, with an OR of 1.40-1.50 compared to normonatraemia, while hypernatraemia is related to even worse outcomes than hyponatraemia. Furthermore, preliminary data show an inverse association between serum sodium and interleukin-6 levels, suggesting that hyponatraemia might be used as a surrogate marker for the risk of a cytokine storm and the need for treatment with interleukin antagonists. In conclusion, dysnatraemia is common and carries a poor prognosis in COVID-19 patients, indicating that it may play a future role in risk stratification and individualising therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypernatremia , Hyponatremia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypernatremia/diagnosis , Hypernatremia/epidemiology , Hypernatremia/etiology , Hypernatremia/therapy , Hyponatremia/diagnosis , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/etiology , Hyponatremia/therapy , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Prevalence , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 184(3): 409-418, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1034947

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The pandemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has rapidly spread globally and infected millions of people. The prevalence and prognostic impact of dysnatremia in COVID-19 is inconclusive. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and outcome of dysnatremia in COVID-19. DESIGN: The prospective, observational, cohort study included consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of COVID-19 triaged to a Swiss Emergency Department between March and July 2020. METHODS: Collected data included clinical, laboratory and disease severity scoring parameters on admission. COVID-19 cases were identified based on a positive nasopharyngeal swab test for SARS-CoV-2, patients with a negative swab test served as controls. The primary analysis was to assess the prognostic impact of dysnatremia on 30-day mortality using a cox proportional hazard model. RESULTS: 172 (17%) cases with COVID-19 and 849 (83%) controls were included. Patients with COVID-19 showed a higher prevalence of hyponatremia compared to controls (28.1% vs 17.5%, P < 0.001); while comparable for hypernatremia (2.9% vs 2.1%, P = 0.34). In COVID-19 but not in controls, hyponatremia was associated with a higher 30-day mortality (HR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.10-16.62, P = 0.05). In both groups, hypernatremia on admission was associated with higher 30-day mortality (COVID-19 - HR: 11.5, 95% CI: 5.00-26.43, P < 0.001; controls - HR: 5.3, 95% CI: 1.60-17.64, P = 0.006). In both groups, hyponatremia and hypernatremia were significantly associated with adverse outcome, for example, intensive care unit admission, longer hospitalization and mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSION: Our results underline the importance of dysnatremia as predictive marker in COVID-19. Treating physicians should be aware of appropriate treatment measures to be taken for patients with COVID-19 and dysnatremia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hypernatremia/diagnosis , Hypernatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/diagnosis , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypernatremia/complications , Hypernatremia/therapy , Hyponatremia/complications , Hyponatremia/therapy , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Pandemics , Prevalence , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology , Triage
4.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(4): 853-862, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871549

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The worldwide spread of SARS-CoV-2 has infected millions of people leading to over 0.3 million mortalities. The disruption of sodium homeostasis, tends to be a common occurrence in patients with COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 1,254 COVID-19 patients comprising 124 (9.9%) hyponatremic patients (under 135 mmol/L) and 30 (2.4%) hypernatremic patients (over 145 mmol/L) from three hospitals in Hubei, China, were enrolled in the study. The relationships between sodium balance disorders in COVID-19 patients, its clinical features, implications, and the underlying causes were presented. Hyponatremia patients were observed to be elderly, had more comorbidities, with severe pneumonic chest radiographic findings. They were also more likely to have a fever, nausea, higher leukocyte and neutrophils count, and a high sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP). Compared to normonatremia patients, renal insufficiency was common in both hyponatremia and hypernatremia patients. In addition, hyponatremia patients required extensive treatment with oxygen, antibiotics, and corticosteroids. The only significant differences between the hypernatremia and normonatremia patients were laboratory findings and clinical complications, and patients with hypernatremia were more likely to use traditional Chinese medicine for treatment compared to normonatremia patients. This study indicates that severity of the disease, the length of stay in the hospital of surviving patients, and mortality were higher among COVID-19 patients with sodium balance disorders. CONCLUSION: Sodium balance disorder, particularly hyponatremia, is a common condition among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Hubei, China, and it is associated with a higher risk of severe illness and increased in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hypernatremia/epidemiology , Hyponatremia/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , China , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypernatremia/diagnosis , Hypernatremia/therapy , Hyponatremia/diagnosis , Hyponatremia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
5.
A A Pract ; 14(9): e01295, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684161

ABSTRACT

We report for the first time therapy-resistant hypernatremia (plasma sodium concentration ≥150 mmol per liter) developing in 6 of 12 critically ill coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients age 57-84 years requiring mechanical ventilation. There was no correlation between plasma sodium concentrations and sodium input. Plasma concentrations of chloride were elevated, those of potassium decreased. These findings are consistent with abnormally increased renal sodium reabsorption, possibly caused by increased angiotensin II activity secondary to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors. As hypernatremia was associated with increased length of intensive care unit stay, special attention should be paid to the electrolyte status of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Fluid Therapy/methods , Hypernatremia/complications , Natriuretic Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Chlorides/blood , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Female , Fluid Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypernatremia/blood , Hypernatremia/epidemiology , Hypernatremia/therapy , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Renal Dialysis , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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