Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Stem Cell Res Ther ; 13(1): 145, 2022 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775335

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the widespread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 pandemic, in spite of the newly emerging vaccines, mutated strains remain a great obstacle to supportive and preventive measures. Coronavirus 19 survivors continue to face great danger of contacting the disease again. As long as no specific treatment has yet to be approved, a great percentage of patients experience real complications, including among others, lung fibrosis. High oxygen inhalation especially for prolonged periods is per se destructive to the lungs. Nevertheless, oxygen remains the first line support for such patients. In the present study we aimed at investigating the role of amniotic fluid-mesenchymal stem cells in preventing versus treating the hyperoxia-induced lung fibrosis in rats. METHODS: The study was conducted on adult albino rats; 5 pregnant female rats were used as amniotic fluid donors, and 64 male rats were randomly divided into two groups: Control group; where 10 rats were kept in normal atmospheric air then sacrificed after 2 months, and hyperoxia-induced lung fibrosis group, where 54 rats were exposed to hyperoxia (100% oxygen for 6 h/day) in air-tight glass chambers for 1 month, then randomly divided into the following 5 subgroups: Hyperoxia group, cell-free media-treated group, stem cells-prophylactic group, stem cells-treated group and untreated group. Isolation, culture and proliferation of stem cells were done till passage 3. Pulmonary function tests, histological examination of lung tissue under light and electron microscopes, biochemical assessment of oxidative stress, IL-6 and Rho-A levels, and statistical analysis of data were performed. F-test (ANOVA) was used for normally distributed quantitative variables, to compare between more than two groups, and Post Hoc test (Tukey) for pairwise comparisons. RESULTS: Labelled amniotic fluid-mesenchymal stem cells homed to lung tissue. Stem cells administration in the stem cells-prophylactic group succeeded to maintain pulmonary functions near the normal values with no significant difference between their values and those of the control group. Moreover, histological examination of lung tissues showed that stem cells-prophylactic group were completely protected while stem cells-treated group still showed various degrees of tissue injury, namely; thickened interalveolar septa, atelectasis and interstitial pneumonia. Biochemical studies after stem cells injection also showed decreased levels of RhoA and IL-6 in the prophylactic group and to a lesser extent in the treated group, in addition to increased total antioxidant capacity and decreased malondialdehyde in the stem cells-injected groups. CONCLUSIONS: Amniotic fluid-mesenchymal stem cells showed promising protective and therapeutic results against hyperoxia-induced lung fibrosis as evaluated physiologically, histologically and biochemically.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hyperoxia , Amniotic Fluid , Animals , Female , Humans , Hyperoxia/complications , Hyperoxia/pathology , Male , Pregnancy , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Stem Cells/pathology
2.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol ; 66(3): 323-336, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714501

ABSTRACT

Administration of high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia) is one of few available options to treat acute hypoxemia-related respiratory failure, as seen in the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Although hyperoxia can cause acute lung injury through increased production of superoxide anion (O2•-), the choice of high-concentration oxygen administration has become a necessity in critical care. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that UCP2 (uncoupling protein 2) has a major function of reducing O2•- generation in the lung in ambient air or in hyperoxia. Lung epithelial cells and wild-type; UCP2-/-; or transgenic, hTrx overexpression-bearing mice (Trx-Tg) were exposed to hyperoxia and O2•- generation was measured by using electron paramagnetic resonance, and lung injury was measured by using histopathologic analysis. UCP2 expression was analyzed by using RT-PCR analysis, Western blotting analysis, and RNA interference. The signal transduction pathways leading to loss of UCP2 expression were analyzed by using IP, phosphoprotein analysis, and specific inhibitors. UCP2 mRNA and protein expression were acutely decreased in hyperoxia, and these decreases were associated with a significant increase in O2•- production in the lung. Treatment of cells with rhTrx (recombinant human thioredoxin) or exposure of Trx-Tg mice prevented the loss of UCP2 protein and decreased O2•- generation in the lung. Trx is also required to maintain UCP2 expression in normoxia. Loss of UCP2 in UCP2-/- mice accentuated lung injury in hyperoxia. Trx activates the MKK4-p38MAPK (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase)-PGC1α (PPARγ [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ] coactivator 1α) pathway, leading to rescue of UCP2 and decreased O2•- generation in hyperoxia. Loss of UCP2 in hyperoxia is a major mechanism of O2•- production in the lung in hyperoxia. rhTrx can protect against lung injury in hyperoxia due to rescue of the loss of UCP2.


Subject(s)
Lung/metabolism , Oxygen/metabolism , Thioredoxins/metabolism , Uncoupling Protein 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cell Line , Humans , Hyperoxia/metabolism , Lung/cytology , MAP Kinase Kinase 4/genetics , MAP Kinase Kinase 4/metabolism , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Oxygen/toxicity , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha/genetics , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Signal Transduction , Superoxides/metabolism , Thioredoxins/genetics , Thioredoxins/pharmacology , Uncoupling Protein 2/genetics , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
3.
Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol ; 321(6): H1103-H1105, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1590548
4.
Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol ; 66(3): 323-336, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566427

ABSTRACT

Administration of high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia) is one of few available options to treat acute hypoxemia-related respiratory failure, as seen in the current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Although hyperoxia can cause acute lung injury through increased production of superoxide anion (O2•-), the choice of high-concentration oxygen administration has become a necessity in critical care. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that UCP2 (uncoupling protein 2) has a major function of reducing O2•- generation in the lung in ambient air or in hyperoxia. Lung epithelial cells and wild-type; UCP2-/-; or transgenic, hTrx overexpression-bearing mice (Trx-Tg) were exposed to hyperoxia and O2•- generation was measured by using electron paramagnetic resonance, and lung injury was measured by using histopathologic analysis. UCP2 expression was analyzed by using RT-PCR analysis, Western blotting analysis, and RNA interference. The signal transduction pathways leading to loss of UCP2 expression were analyzed by using IP, phosphoprotein analysis, and specific inhibitors. UCP2 mRNA and protein expression were acutely decreased in hyperoxia, and these decreases were associated with a significant increase in O2•- production in the lung. Treatment of cells with rhTrx (recombinant human thioredoxin) or exposure of Trx-Tg mice prevented the loss of UCP2 protein and decreased O2•- generation in the lung. Trx is also required to maintain UCP2 expression in normoxia. Loss of UCP2 in UCP2-/- mice accentuated lung injury in hyperoxia. Trx activates the MKK4-p38MAPK (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase)-PGC1α (PPARγ [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ] coactivator 1α) pathway, leading to rescue of UCP2 and decreased O2•- generation in hyperoxia. Loss of UCP2 in hyperoxia is a major mechanism of O2•- production in the lung in hyperoxia. rhTrx can protect against lung injury in hyperoxia due to rescue of the loss of UCP2.


Subject(s)
Lung/metabolism , Oxygen/metabolism , Thioredoxins/metabolism , Uncoupling Protein 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Cell Line , Humans , Hyperoxia/metabolism , Lung/cytology , MAP Kinase Kinase 4/genetics , MAP Kinase Kinase 4/metabolism , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Knockout , Mice, Transgenic , Oxygen/toxicity , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha/genetics , Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Signal Transduction , Superoxides/metabolism , Thioredoxins/genetics , Thioredoxins/pharmacology , Uncoupling Protein 2/genetics , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
5.
J Cell Mol Med ; 25(17): 8558-8566, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393908

ABSTRACT

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown as an effective medicinal means to treat bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The widely used MSCs were from Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) and bone marrow (BM-MSCs). Amniotic fluid MSCs (AF-MSCs) may be produced before an individual is born to treat foetal diseases by autoplastic transplantation. We evaluated intratracheal (IT) MSCs as an approach to treat an hyperoxia-induced BPD animal model and compared the therapeutic effects between AF-, UC- and BM-MSCs. A BPD animal model was generated by exposing newborn rats to 95% O2 . The continued stress lasted 21 days, and the treatment of IT MSCs was conducted for 4 days. The therapeutic effects were analysed, including lung histology, level of inflammatory cytokines, cell death ratio and state of angiogenesis, by sacrificing the experimental animal at day 21. The lasting hyperoxia stress induced BPD similar to the biological phenotype. The treatment of IT MSCs was safe without deaths and normal organ histopathology. Specifically, the treatment was effective by inhibiting the alveolar dilatation, reducing inflammatory cytokines, inducing angiogenesis and lowering the cell death ratio. AF-MSCs had better therapeutic effects compared with UC-MSCs in relieving the pulmonary alveoli histological changes and promoting neovascularization, and UC-MSCs had the best immunosuppressive effect in plasma and lung lysis compared with AF-MSCs and BM-MSCs. This study demonstrated the therapeutic effects of AF-, UC- and BM-MSCs in BPD model. Superior treatment effect was provided by antenatal MSCs compared to BM-MSC in a statistical comparison.


Subject(s)
Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia/therapy , Hyperoxia/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Cells, Cultured , Humans , Mesenchymal Stem Cells , Neovascularization, Physiologic , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Umbilical Cord
6.
Antioxid Redox Signal ; 35(8): 642-687, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306507

ABSTRACT

Significance: In recent years, a number of studies have shown altered oxygen partial pressure at a tissue level in metabolic disorders, and some researchers have considered oxygen to be a (macro) nutrient. Oxygen availability may be compromised in obesity and several other metabolism-related pathological conditions, including sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome, the metabolic syndrome (which is a set of conditions), type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Recent Advances: Strategies designed to reduce adiposity and its accompanying disorders have been mainly centered on nutritional interventions and physical activity programs. However, novel therapies are needed since these approaches have not been sufficient to counteract the worldwide increasing rates of metabolic disorders. In this regard, intermittent hypoxia training and hyperoxia could be potential treatments through oxygen-related adaptations. Moreover, living at a high altitude may have a protective effect against the development of abnormal metabolic conditions. In addition, oxygen delivery systems may be of therapeutic value for supplying the tissue-specific oxygen requirements. Critical Issues: Precise in vivo methods to measure oxygenation are vital to disentangle some of the controversies related to this research area. Further, it is evident that there is a growing need for novel in vitro models to study the potential pathways involved in metabolic dysfunction to find appropriate therapeutic targets. Future Directions: Based on the existing evidence, it is suggested that oxygen availability has a key role in obesity and its related comorbidities. Oxygen should be considered in relation to potential therapeutic strategies in the treatment and prevention of metabolic disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 35, 642-687.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hyperoxia , Metabolic Syndrome , Humans , Hyperoxia/metabolism , Hypoxia , Oxygen
7.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 22401, 2020 12 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-997946

ABSTRACT

The severity of COVID-19 lung disease is higher in the elderly and people with pre-existing co-morbidities. People who were born preterm may be at greater risk for COVID-19 because their early exposure to oxygen (hyperoxia) at birth increases the severity of respiratory viral infections. Hyperoxia at birth increases the severity of influenza A virus infections in adult mice by reducing the number of alveolar epithelial type 2 (AT2) cells. Since AT2 cells express the SARS-CoV-2 receptors angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE2) and transmembrane protease/serine subfamily member 2 (TMPRSS2), their expression should decline as AT2 cells are depleted by hyperoxia. Instead, ACE2 was detected in airway Club cells and endothelial cells at birth, and then AT2 cells at one year of age. Neonatal hyperoxia stimulated expression of ACE2 in Club cells and in AT2 cells by 2 months of age. It also stimulated expression of TMPRSS2 in the lung. Increased expression of SARS-CoV-2 receptors was blocked by mitoTEMPO, a mitochondrial superoxide scavenger that reduced oxidative stress and DNA damage seen in oxygen-exposed mice. Our finding that hyperoxia enhances the age-dependent expression of SARS-CoV-2 receptors in mice helps explain why COVID-19 lung disease is greater in the elderly and people with pre-existing co-morbidities.


Subject(s)
Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/pathology , Hyperoxia/pathology , Receptors, Virus/biosynthesis , Serine Endopeptidases/biosynthesis , Aging , Animals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Mol Med ; 26(1): 98, 2020 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-894987

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation, in combination with supraphysiological concentrations of oxygen (i.e., hyperoxia), is routinely used to treat patients with respiratory distress, such as COVID-19. However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia compromises the clearance of invading pathogens by impairing macrophage phagocytosis. Previously, we have shown that the exposure of mice to hyperoxia induces the release of the nuclear protein high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) into the pulmonary airways. Furthermore, extracellular HMGB1 impairs macrophage phagocytosis and increases the mortality of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). The aim of this study was to determine whether GTS-21 (3-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene) anabaseine), an α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) agonist, could (1) inhibit hyperoxia-induced HMGB1 release into the airways; (2) enhance macrophage phagocytosis and (3) increase bacterial clearance from the lungs in a mouse model of ventilator-associated pneumonia. METHOD: GTS-21 (0.04, 0.4, and 4 mg/kg) or saline were administered by intraperitoneal injection to mice that were exposed to hyperoxia (≥ 99% O2) and subsequently challenged with PA. RESULTS: The systemic administration of 4 mg/kg i.p. of GTS-21 significantly increased bacterial clearance, decreased acute lung injury and decreased accumulation of airway HMGB1 compared to the saline control. To determine the mechanism of action of GTS-21, RAW 264.7 cells, a macrophage-like cell line, were incubated with different concentrations of GTS-21 in the presence of 95% O2. The phagocytic activity of macrophages was significantly increased by GTS-21 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GTS-21 significantly inhibited the cytoplasmic translocation and release of HMGB1 from RAW 264.7 cells and attenuated hyperoxia-induced NF-κB activation in macrophages and mouse lungs exposed to hyperoxia and infected with PA. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that GTS-21 is efficacious in improving bacterial clearance and reducing acute lung injury via enhancing macrophage function by inhibiting the release of nuclear HMGB1. Therefore, the α7nAChR represents a possible pharmacological target to improve the clinical outcome of patients on ventilators by augmenting host defense against bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Benzylidene Compounds/pharmacology , Hyperoxia/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/drug effects , Pseudomonas Infections/drug therapy , Pyridines/pharmacology , Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury/drug therapy , alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Hyperoxia/diet therapy , Macrophages, Alveolar/immunology , Macrophages, Alveolar/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Phagocytosis/drug effects , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , RAW 264.7 Cells
9.
Mol Med ; 26(1): 63, 2020 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617382

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oxygen therapy, using supraphysiological concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia), is routinely administered to patients who require respiratory support including mechanical ventilation (MV). However, prolonged exposure to hyperoxia results in acute lung injury (ALI) and accumulation of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in the airways. We previously showed that airway HMGB1 mediates hyperoxia-induced lung injury in a mouse model of ALI. Cholinergic signaling through the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) attenuates several inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to determine whether 3-(2,4 dimethoxy-benzylidene)-anabaseine dihydrochloride, GTS-21, an α7nAChR partial agonist, inhibits hyperoxia-induced HMGB1 accumulation in the airways and circulation, and consequently attenuates inflammatory lung injury. METHODS: Mice were exposed to hyperoxia (≥99% O2) for 3 days and treated concurrently with GTS-21 (0.04, 0.4 and 4 mg/kg, i.p.) or the control vehicle, saline. RESULTS: The systemic administration of GTS-21 (4 mg/kg) significantly decreased levels of HMGB1 in the airways and the serum. Moreover, GTS-21 (4 mg/kg) significantly reduced hyperoxia-induced acute inflammatory lung injury, as indicated by the decreased total protein content in the airways, reduced infiltration of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils into the lung tissue and airways, and improved lung injury histopathology. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that GTS-21 can attenuate hyperoxia-induced ALI by inhibiting extracellular HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses. This suggests that the α7nAChR represents a potential pharmacological target for the treatment regimen of oxidative inflammatory lung injury in patients receiving oxygen therapy.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Benzylidene Compounds/pharmacology , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Hyperoxia/complications , Nicotinic Agonists/pharmacology , Pyridines/pharmacology , Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Biomarkers , Disease Susceptibility , HMGB1 Protein/blood , HMGB1 Protein/genetics , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Mice , Models, Biological
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL