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13.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 10(10): 2514-2523, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2004188

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created an explosion in the use of telehealth. However, telehealth consists of much more than a video discussion between doctor and patient. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, allergists have demonstrated a high level of synchronous telemedicine adoption with existing patients but have not taken full advantage of other virtual care modalities that have the potential to facilitate the efficient delivery of allergy care to the broader population. This is partially due to a lack of awareness about the various remote care services and how to implement and bill for them appropriately. This rostrum describes the spectrum of telehealth services, reviews existing literature on the use of telehealth in allergy, and provides suggestions about how allergists and immunologists can optimize the use of telehealth to optimize patient access and outcomes as well as receive appropriate compensation for specialty clinical services provided by themselves and their staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypersensitivity , Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Hypersensitivity/epidemiology , Hypersensitivity/therapy , Pandemics
14.
Expert Rev Clin Immunol ; 18(10): 995-996, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972806
15.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 10(10): 2493-2499, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1945417

ABSTRACT

The use of telemedicine has increased in allergy/immunology, with rapid uptake of its use during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Existing data indicate an overall positive view of telemedicine by patients, particularly during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. However, patients and clinicians prefer in-person visits for specific types of allergy/immunology encounters, such as those requiring a physical examination or diagnostic testing. The most data for telemedicine exist with asthma, and provide a model for treatment technique, therapeutic monitoring, and education in other allergic and immunologic conditions. Clinician satisfaction is also necessary for telemedicine to be an enduring option for patient/clinician interactions, and this is influenced by a multitude of factors, including technology quality, reimbursement, and maintenance of patient/clinician relationships. Areas of future research should include the need for more outcome data in additional disease states, which will likely help facilitate improved logistical policies around telemedicine that would facilitate its adoption.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypersensitivity , Telemedicine , Attitude , Humans , Hypersensitivity/diagnosis , Hypersensitivity/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Telemedicine/methods
16.
Allergol Int ; 71(3): 310-317, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926162

ABSTRACT

In October 2021, researchers from the German Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and from the Japanese Society of Allergology (JSA) focused their attention on the pathological conditions and modifiers of various allergic diseases. Topics included 1) the pathophysiology of IgE/mast cell-mediated allergic diseases; 2) the diagnosis and prevention of IgE/mast cell-mediated diseases; 3) the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of eosinophilic airway diseases; and 4) host-pathogen interaction and allergic diseases. This report summarizes the panel discussions, which highlighted the importance of recognizing the diversity of genetics, immunological mechanisms, and modifying factors underlying allergic diseases.


Subject(s)
Hypersensitivity , Immunoglobulin E , Humans , Hypersensitivity/drug therapy , Hypersensitivity/therapy
17.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 10(10): 2507-2513.e1, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1907246

ABSTRACT

Secondary to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, telehealth quickly peaked as the dominant health care modality and its use still remains high. Although allergists and health care systems adapted quickly to adopt telehealth, its increased use has both highlighted its benefits for patients and allergists and demonstrated known concerns with delivering allergy specialty care to rural and regional patient populations. With increased concentration of both patients and allergists in urban areas, the ability to provide allergy specialty care to the rural and remote population continues to remain a challenge despite the advantages leveraged through telehealth. Herein, we review aspects specific to the rural patient population, tele-allergy outcomes with these patient cohorts, and efforts, both past and present, taken at different levels within the allergy community to promote our specialty through specific telehealth modalities to address and engage the rural and regional patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypersensitivity , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Hypersensitivity/epidemiology , Hypersensitivity/therapy , Rural Population
18.
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol ; 129(3): 308-312.e1, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1889189

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hong Kong started its coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination program in February 2021. A territory-wide Vaccine Allergy Safety (VAS) clinic was set up to assess individuals deemed at "higher risk" of COVID-19 vaccine-associated allergies. A novel "hub-and-spoke" model was piloted to tackle the overwhelming demand of services by allowing nonallergists to conduct assessment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcomes of the VAS hub-and-spoke model for allergy assessment. METHODS: Records of patients attending the VAS hub-and-spoke Clinics between March and August 2021 were reviewed (n = 2725). We studied the overall results between the Hub (allergist led) and Spoke (nonallergist led) Clinics. The Hub and the Hong Kong West Cluster Spoke Clinic were selected for subgroup analysis as they saw the largest number of patients (n = 1411). RESULTS: A total of 2725 patients were assessed under the VAS hub-and-spoke model. Overall, 2324 patients (85.3%) were recommended to proceed with vaccination. Allergists recommended significantly more patients for vaccination than nonallergists (odds ratio = 21.58; P < .001). Subgroup analysis revealed that 881 of 1055 (83.5%) patients received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccination safely after assessment. Among those recommended vaccination, more patients assessed by allergists received their first dose of vaccination (odds ratio = 4.18; P < .001). CONCLUSION: The hub-and-spoke model has proven to be successful for the vaccination campaign. This study has illustrated the crucial role of allergists in countering vaccine hesitancy. Results from the study revealed considerable differences in outcomes between allergist-led and nonallergist-led clinics. Precise reasons for these differences warrant further evaluation. We are hopeful that the hub-and-spoke model can be similarly adapted for other allergist-integrative services in the future.


Subject(s)
Allergists , COVID-19 Vaccines , Health Services , Hypersensitivity , Patient Safety , Physician's Role , Vaccination , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Hypersensitivity/prevention & control , Hypersensitivity/therapy , Immunization Programs , Odds Ratio , Pilot Projects , Risk Assessment , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Hesitancy
19.
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract ; 10(4): 979-980, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778258
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