Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 253
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
4.
Arch Med Res ; 52(7): 738-745, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been observed that subjects with comorbidities related to metabolic syndrome (MetS) as hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetes mellitus (DM2) show severe cases and a higher mortality by COVID-19. To date, there is little information available on the impact of the interaction between these comorbidities in the risk of death by COVID-19. AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the impact of the combinations of MetS components in overall survival (OS) and risk of death among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Using public data of the Ministry of Health, suspected, and confirmed COVID-19 cases from February 25-June 6, 2020 was analyzed. Mortality odds ratio (OR) was calculated with a univariate analysis (95% CI) and attributable risk. Interactions between components and survival curves were analyzed and a multivariate logistics regression analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The analysis included 528,651 cases out of which 202,951 were confirmed for COVID-19. Probabilities of OS among confirmed patients were 0.93, 0.89, 0.87, 0.86, and 0.83 while the OR of multivariate analysis was 1.83 (1.77-1.89), 2.58 (2.48-2.69), 2.83 (2.66-3.01), and 3.36 (2.83-3.99) for zero, one, two, three, and four MetS components, respectively. The combination with the highest risk was DM2 + hypertension at 2.22 (2.15-2.28), and the attributable risk for any component was 9.35% (9.21-9.49). Only the combination obesity + CVD showed no significant interaction. CONCLUSION: The presence of one MetS component doubles the risk of death by COVID-19, which was higher among patients with DM2 + hypertension. Only obesity and CVD do not interact significantly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Metabolic Syndrome , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(5): 102248, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439983

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study aims to find a quantitative association between the presence of co-existing diabetes mellitus (DM) and/or hypertension (HTN) with COVID-19 infection severity and mortality. METHODS: A total of 813 patients with a positive COVID-19 were included. A case-control design was used to dissect the association between DM and HTN with COVID-19 severity and mortality. RESULTS: According to MOHFW guidelines, 535 (65.7%) patients had mild, 160 (19.7%) patients had moderate, and 118 (14.5%) patients had severe disease outcomes including mortality in 52 patients. Age, Neutrophil%, and Diabetes status were significantly associated with severe COVID-19 infection. After adjusting for age, patients with diabetes were 2.46 times more likely to have severe disease (Chi-squared = 18.89, p-value<0.0001) and 2.11 times more likely to have a fatal outcome (Chi-squared = 6.04, p-value = 0.014). However, we did not find evidence for Hypertension modifying the COVID-19 outcomes in Diabetic patients. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 severity and mortality both were significantly associated with the status of DM and its risk may not be modified by the presence of HTN.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/mortality , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
6.
N Engl J Med ; 385(12): 1067-1077, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413249

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Salt substitutes with reduced sodium levels and increased potassium levels have been shown to lower blood pressure, but their effects on cardiovascular and safety outcomes are uncertain. METHODS: We conducted an open-label, cluster-randomized trial involving persons from 600 villages in rural China. The participants had a history of stroke or were 60 years of age or older and had high blood pressure. The villages were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to the intervention group, in which the participants used a salt substitute (75% sodium chloride and 25% potassium chloride by mass), or to the control group, in which the participants continued to use regular salt (100% sodium chloride). The primary outcome was stroke, the secondary outcomes were major adverse cardiovascular events and death from any cause, and the safety outcome was clinical hyperkalemia. RESULTS: A total of 20,995 persons were enrolled in the trial. The mean age of the participants was 65.4 years, and 49.5% were female, 72.6% had a history of stroke, and 88.4% a history of hypertension. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.74 years. The rate of stroke was lower with the salt substitute than with regular salt (29.14 events vs. 33.65 events per 1000 person-years; rate ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77 to 0.96; P = 0.006), as were the rates of major cardiovascular events (49.09 events vs. 56.29 events per 1000 person-years; rate ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80 to 0.94; P<0.001) and death (39.28 events vs. 44.61 events per 1000 person-years; rate ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.95; P<0.001). The rate of serious adverse events attributed to hyperkalemia was not significantly higher with the salt substitute than with regular salt (3.35 events vs. 3.30 events per 1000 person-years; rate ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.37; P = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: Among persons who had a history of stroke or were 60 years of age or older and had high blood pressure, the rates of stroke, major cardiovascular events, and death from any cause were lower with the salt substitute than with regular salt. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; SSaSS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02092090.).


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Diet, Sodium-Restricted , Hypertension/diet therapy , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , China , Diet, Sodium-Restricted/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Hyperkalemia/complications , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Potassium, Dietary/adverse effects , Secondary Prevention , Stroke/epidemiology
10.
Auton Neurosci ; 235: 102872, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372890

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Syncope is not a common manifestation of COVID-19, but it may occur in this context and it can be the presenting symptom in some cases. Different mechanisms may explain the pathophysiology behind COVID-19 related syncope. In this report, we aimed to examine the current frequency and etiology of syncope in COVID-19. METHODS: A systematic review across PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS was performed, according to PRISMA guidelines, in order to identify all relevant articles regarding both COVID-19 and syncope. RESULTS: We identified 136 publications, of which 99 were excluded. The frequency of syncope and pre-syncope across the selected studies was 4.2% (604/14,437). Unexplained syncope was the most common type (87.9% of the episodes), followed by reflex syncope (7.8% of the cases). Orthostatic hypotension was responsible for 2.2% of the cases and syncope of presumable cardiac cause also accounted for 2.2% of cases. Arterial hypertension was present in 52.0% of syncope patients. The use of angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors were not associated with an increased incidence of syncope (chi-square test 1.07, p 0.30), unlike the use of beta-blockers (chi-square test 12.48, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Syncope, although not considered a typical symptom of COVID-19, can be associated with it, particularly in early stages. Different causes of syncope were seen in this context. A reevaluation of blood pressure in patients with COVID-19 is suggested, including reassessment of antihypertensive therapy, especially in the case of beta-blockers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Syncope/complications , Autonomic Nervous System Diseases/complications , Humans , Hypertension/complications
11.
Zool Res ; 42(5): 633-636, 2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369995

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the etiologic agent responsible for the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Numerous studies have demonstrated that cardiovascular disease may affect COVID-19 progression. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypertension on viral replication and COVID-19 progression using a hypertensive mouse model infected with SARS-CoV-2. Results revealed that SARS-CoV-2 replication was delayed in hypertensive mouse lungs. In contrast, SARS-CoV-2 replication in hypertensive mice treated with the antihypertensive drug captopril demonstrated similar virus replication as SARS-CoV-2-infected normotensive mice. Furthermore, antihypertensive treatment alleviated lung inflammation induced by SARS-CoV-2 replication (interleukin (IL)-1ß up-regulation and increased immune cell infiltration). No differences in lung inflammation were observed between the SARS-CoV-2-infected normotensive mice and hypertensive mice. Our findings suggest that captopril treatment may alleviate COVID-19 progression but not affect viral replication.


Subject(s)
Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Captopril/therapeutic use , Hypertension/complications , Lung Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Captopril/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lung Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases/virology , Mice , Virus Replication/drug effects
12.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5390-5395, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363677

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulability and thrombosis caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are related to the higher mortality rate. Because of limited data on the antiplatelet effect, we aimed to evaluate the impact of aspirin add-on therapy on the outcome of the patients hospitalized due to severe COVID-19. In this cohort study, patients with a confirmed diagnosis of severe COVID-19 admitted to Imam Hossein Medical Center, Tehran, Iran from March 2019 to July 2020 were included. Demographics and related clinical data during their hospitalization were recorded. The mortality rate of the patients was considered as the primary outcome and its association with aspirin use was assessed. Nine hundred and ninety-one patients were included, of that 336 patients (34%) received aspirin during their hospitalization and 655 ones (66%) did not. Comorbidities were more prevalent in the patients who were receiving aspirin. Results from the multivariate COX proportional model demonstrated a significant independent association between aspirin use and reduction in the risk of in-hospital mortality (0.746 [0.560-0.994], p = 0.046). Aspirin use in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is associated with a significant decrease in mortality rate. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and adverse effects of aspirin administration in this population.


Subject(s)
Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/drug therapy , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Blood Platelets/drug effects , Blood Platelets/pathology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Coronary Artery Disease/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/drug therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/complications , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/mortality , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/virology , Drug Combinations , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Iran , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Lung/blood supply , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/mortality , Pulmonary Embolism/virology , Respiration, Artificial/mortality , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
13.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0255999, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The primary goal of the presented cross-sectional observational study was to determine the clinical and demographic risk factors for adverse coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes in the Pakistani population. METHODS: We examined the individuals (n = 6331) that consulted two private diagnostic centers in Lahore, Pakistan, for COVID-19 testing between May 1, 2020, and November 30, 2020. The attending nurse collected clinical and demographic information. A confirmed case of COVID-19 was defined as having a positive result through real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay of nasopharyngeal swab specimens. RESULTS: RT-PCR testing was positive in 1094 cases. Out of which, 5.2% had severe, and 20.8% had mild symptoms. We observed a strong association of COVID-19 severity with the number and type of comorbidities. The severity of the disease intensified as the number of comorbidities increased. The most vulnerable groups for the poor outcome are patients with diabetes and hypertension. Increasing age was also associated with PCR positivity and the severity of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: Most cases of COVID-19 included in this study developed mild symptoms or were asymptomatic. Risk factors for adverse outcomes included older age and the simultaneous presence of comorbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Demography , Diabetes Complications/pathology , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Pakistan/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/analysis , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1387-1401, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343660

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infected individuals that have hypertension or cardiovascular comorbidities have an elevated risk of serious coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease and high rates of mortality but how COVID-$19$ and cardiovascular diseases interact are unclear. We therefore sought to identify novel mechanisms of interaction by identifying genes with altered expression in SARS-CoV-$2$ infection that are relevant to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. Some recent research shows the SARS-CoV-$2$ uses the angiotensin converting enzyme-$2$ (ACE-$2$) as a receptor to infect human susceptible cells. The ACE2 gene is expressed in many human tissues, including intestine, testis, kidneys, heart and lungs. ACE2 usually converts Angiotensin I in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system to Angiotensin II, which affects blood pressure levels. ACE inhibitors prescribed for cardiovascular disease and hypertension may increase the levels of ACE-$2$, although there are claims that such medications actually reduce lung injury caused by COVID-$19$. We employed bioinformatics and systematic approaches to identify such genetic links, using messenger RNA data peripheral blood cells from COVID-$19$ patients and compared them with blood samples from patients with either chronic heart failure disease or hypertensive diseases. We have also considered the immune response genes with elevated expression in COVID-$19$ to those active in cardiovascular diseases and hypertension. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to COVID-$19$ and chronic heart failure, and common to COVID-$19$ and hypertension, were identified; the involvement of these common genes in the signalling pathways and ontologies studied. COVID-$19$ does not share a large number of differentially expressed genes with the conditions under consideration. However, those that were identified included genes playing roles in T cell functions, toll-like receptor pathways, cytokines, chemokines, cell stress, type 2 diabetes and gastric cancer. We also identified protein-protein interactions, gene regulatory networks and suggested drug and chemical compound interactions using the differentially expressed genes. The result of this study may help in identifying significant targets of treatment that can combat the ongoing pandemic due to SARS-CoV-$2$ infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Computational Biology , Hypertension/complications , Systems Biology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
16.
Nephrol Dial Transplant ; 36(1): 87-94, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327386

ABSTRACT

Diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease have been listed as risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) since the first report of the disease in January 2020. However, this report did not mention chronic kidney disease (CKD) nor did it provide information on the relevance of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or albuminuria. As the disease spread across the globe, information on larger populations with greater granularity on risk factors emerged. The recently published OpenSAFELY project analysed factors associated with COVID-19 death in 17 million patients. The picture that arose differs significantly from initial reports. For example, hypertension is not an independent risk factor for COVID-19 death [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.89], but renal disease very much is. Dialysis (aHR 3.69), organ transplantation (aHR 3.53) and CKD (aHR 2.52 for patients with eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m2) represent three of the four comorbidities associated with the highest mortality risk from COVID-19. The risk associated with CKD Stages 4 and 5 is higher than the risk associated with diabetes mellitus (aHR range 1.31-1.95, depending upon glycaemic control) or chronic heart disease (aHR 1.17). In another recent publication, the Global Burden of Disease collaboration identified that worldwide, CKD is the most prevalent risk factor for severe COVID-19. Moreover, the distribution of risk factors for COVID-19 mortality appears to be different in patients with CKD when compared with the general population. The high prevalence of CKD in combination with the elevated risk of mortality from COVID-19 in CKD necessitates urgent action for this group of patients. This article defines essential action points (summarized in Box 1), among which is advocating the inclusion of CKD patients in clinical trials testing the efficacy of drugs and vaccines to prevent severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Albuminuria/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Comorbidity , Critical Care , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Europe , Female , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Male , Prevalence , Proportional Hazards Models , Registries , Renal Dialysis , Risk Factors , Societies, Medical
17.
Hipertens Riesgo Vasc ; 37(4): 169-175, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322115

ABSTRACT

The first case of COVID-19 was reported on 31 December 2019 in Wuhan, China. Ever since there has been unprecedented and growing interest in learning about all aspects of this new disease. Debate has been generated as to the association between antihypertensive therapy with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors and SARS-CoV-2 infection. While many questions as yet remain unanswered, the aim of this report is to inform health professionals about the current state of knowledge. Because this is an ever-evolving topic, the recommendation is that it be updated as new evidence becomes available. Below, we provide a review of pre-clinical and clinical studies that link coronavirus to the RAAS.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , ADAM17 Protein/physiology , Angiotensin II/physiology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Antihypertensive Agents/adverse effects , Antihypertensive Agents/pharmacology , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Models, Biological , Pandemics/prevention & control , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/drug effects , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Receptors, Virus/drug effects , Renin-Angiotensin System/drug effects , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/physiology , Viral Vaccines , Virus Internalization/drug effects
18.
Rev Esp Quimioter ; 34(4): 337-341, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317435

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The study aims to describe characteristics and clinical outcome of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection that received siltuximab according to a protocol that aimed to early block the activity of IL-6 to avoid the progression of the inflammatory flare. METHODS: Retrospective review of the first 31 patients with SARS-CoV-2 treated with siltuximab, in Hospital Clinic of Barcelona or Hospital Universitario Salamanca, from March to April 2020 with positive polymerase-chain reaction (PCR) from a nasopharyngeal swab. RESULTS: The cohort included 31 cases that received siltuximab with a median (IQR) age of 62 (56-71) and 71% were males. The most frequent comorbidity was hypertension (48%). The median dose of siltuximab was 800 mg ranging between 785 and 900 mg. 7 patients received siltuximab as a salvage therapy after one dose of tocilizumab. At the end of the study, a total of 26 (83.9) patients had been discharged alive and the mortality rate was 16.1% but only 1 out of 24 that received siltuximab as a first line option (4%). CONCLUSIONS: Siltuximab is a well-tolerated alternative to tocilizumab when administered as a first line option in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia within the first 10 days from symptoms onset and high C-reactive protein.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Salvage Therapy , Treatment Outcome
19.
Int J Hematol ; 114(5): 626-629, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310613

ABSTRACT

Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a known menace in hematology and is quite rare in practice with known triggers. Lately, in the COVID-19 pandemic, hematology has seen a new pathology amongst which TTP associated with COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine is unique. We report a case of a 69-year-old male with multiple comorbidities who presented to the hospital with severe fatigue and shortness of breath. Labs were significant for thrombocytopenia, anemia, and hemolysis with schistocytes consistent with TTP with a second dose of BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine as a likely culprit been documented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 , Immunization, Secondary/adverse effects , Pandemics , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , ADAMTS13 Protein/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Combined Modality Therapy , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , HIV Infections/complications , Hepatitis B, Chronic/complications , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Male , Plasma Exchange , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/blood , Purpura, Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic/therapy , Venous Thrombosis/complications
20.
Salud Publica Mex ; 63(1, ene-feb): 136-146, 2020 Dec 22.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310304

ABSTRACT

Objetivo. Establecer criterios médicos de retorno al trabajo en personal con riesgo de complicaciones por Covid-19. Material y métodos. Se realizó una revisión sistemática para identificar las condiciones y las características clínicas que influyen en el riesgo de desarrollar Covid-19 grave. Resultados. Se ha demostrado incremento del riesgo en obesidad, edad >60 años, diabetes mellitus, hipertensión arterial, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, enfermedad cardiovascular, enfermedad renal crónica y cáncer. Solamente en diabetes se ha estudiado si el control previo influye. Se proponen condiciones específicas y el nivel de riesgo epidemiológico para el retorno al trabajo. Conclusiones. El retorno laboral de estos grupos debe priorizarse buscando favorecer el control de la enfermedad, identificando el estado de salud que incrementa el riesgo y protegiendo el derecho al trabajo. Se presentan recomendaciones para guiar la reincorporación al trabajo.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Return to Work , Age Factors , Asthma/complications , Breast Feeding , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus , Female , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Obesity/complications , Pregnancy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/complications , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Risk Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...