Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
Am J Cardiol ; 173: 1-7, 2022 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1859264

ABSTRACT

In this randomized, prospective monocentric study, 40 subjects with coronary artery disease or hypertension (cardiovascular disease [CVD] group) were assigned to either surgical mask (SM) or class 2 filtering facepiece mask (FFP2). They performed cycle ergometry exercise tests with progressive intensity until exhaustion with the assigned mask and another test with no mask (NM) in random order. A control group of 10 healthy subjects randomly performed 3 exercise tests with NM, SM, and FFP2, respectively. Blood pressure, heart rate, 12-lead electrocardiogram, exertion, shortness of breath, and capillary blood gases from the earlobe were documented. Across all groups, exercise testing with face masks resulted in a significantly reduced peak power output in watts compared with testing with NM (CVD group: SM vs NM: -5.0 ± 7.0%, p = 0.005; FFP2 vs NM: -4.7 ± 14%, p = 0.03; control group: SM vs NM: -6.8 ± 4.4%, p = 0.008; FFP2 vs NM: -8.9 ± 6.3%; p = 0.01) without differences in hemodynamic parameters, such as maximum heart rate and systolic blood pressure. Wearing an FFP2 compared with NM resulted in significant higher carbon dioxide partial pressure (CVD group: FFP2: 36.0 ± 3.2 mm Hg vs NM: 33.3 ± 4.4 mm Hg, p = 0.019; control group: FFP2: 32.6 ± 2.8 mm Hg vs NM: 28.1 ± 1.7 mm Hg, p <0.001) with corresponding differences in hydrogen carbonate and base excess, but not to a clinically critical extent. In conclusion, exercise testing with SM and FFP2 resulted in a significant reduction of peak power output without differences in hemodynamic parameters in subjects with preexisting CVD and in healthy subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Artery Disease , Hypertension , Coronary Artery Disease/etiology , Humans , Hypertension/etiology , Masks/adverse effects , Physical Functional Performance , Prospective Studies
3.
Circ Res ; 128(7): 808-826, 2021 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597870

ABSTRACT

In recent decades low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have been witnessing a significant shift toward raised blood pressure; yet in LMICs, only 1 in 3 are aware of their hypertension status, and ≈8% have their blood pressure controlled. This rising burden widens the inequality gap, contributes to massive economic hardships of patients and carers, and increases costs to the health system, facing challenges such as low physician-to-patient ratios and lack of access to medicines. Established risk factors include unhealthy diet (high salt and low fruit and vegetable intake), physical inactivity, tobacco and alcohol use, and obesity. Emerging risk factors include pollution (air, water, noise, and light), urbanization, and a loss of green space. Risk factors that require further in-depth research are low birth weight and social and commercial determinants of health. Global actions include the HEARTS technical package and the push for universal health care. Promising research efforts highlight that successful interventions are feasible in LMICs. These include creation of health-promoting environments by introducing salt-reduction policies and sugar and alcohol tax; implementing cost-effective screening and simplified treatment protocols to mitigate treatment inertia; pooled procurement of low-cost single-pill combination therapy to improve adherence; increasing access to telehealth and mHealth (mobile health); and training health care staff, including community health workers, to strengthen team-based care. As the blood pressure trajectory continues creeping upward in LMICs, contextual research on effective, safe, and cost-effective interventions is urgent. New emergent risk factors require novel solutions. Lowering blood pressure in LMICs requires urgent global political and scientific priority and action.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries , Hypertension , Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects , Blood Pressure Monitors/standards , Blood Pressure Monitors/supply & distribution , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena , Developing Countries/statistics & numerical data , Diet/adverse effects , Environment , Environmental Pollution/adverse effects , Health Behavior , Heart Diseases/mortality , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/etiology , Life Style , Nurses/supply & distribution , Obesity/complications , Physicians/supply & distribution , Prevalence , Research , Risk Factors , Sedentary Behavior , Social Determinants of Health , Stroke/mortality , Tobacco Use/adverse effects , Urbanization
4.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 21(1): 228, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518273

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome novel coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly worldwide. SARS-CoV-2 has been found to cause multiple organ damage; however, little attention has been paid to the damage to the endocrine system caused by this virus, and the subsequent impact on prognosis. This may be the first research on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis and prognosis in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: In this retrospective observational study, 235 patients were admitted to the hospital with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from 22 January to 17 March 2020. Clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, and treatments were obtained from electronic medical records with standard data collection forms and compared among patients with different thyroid function status. RESULTS: Among 235 patients, 17 (7.23%) had subclinical hypothyroidism, 11 (4.68%) severe non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), and 23 (9.79%) mild to moderate NTIS. Composite endpoint events of each group, including mortality, admission to the ICU, and using IMV were observed. Compared with normal thyroid function, the hazard ratios (HRs) of composite endpoint events for mild to moderate NTIS, severe NTIS, subclinical hypothyroidism were 27.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.07-105.7), 23.1 (95% CI 5.75-92.8), and 4.04 (95% CI 0.69-23.8) respectively. The multivariate-adjusted HRs for acute cardiac injury among patients with NTF, subclinical hypothyroidism, severe NTIS, and mild to moderate NTIS were 1.00, 1.68 (95% CI 0.56-5.05), 4.68 (95% CI 1.76-12.4), and 2.63 (95% CI 1.09-6.36) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that the suppression of the HPT axis could be a common complication in COVID-19 patients and an indicator of the severity of prognosis. Among the three different types of thyroid dysfunction with COVID-19, mild to moderate NTIS and severe NTIS have a higher risk of severe outcomes compared with subclinical hypothyroidism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Euthyroid Sick Syndromes/etiology , Hypertension/etiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors
5.
Hypertension ; 79(2): 325-334, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476907

ABSTRACT

In a cross-sectional analysis of a case-control study in 2015, we revealed the association between increased arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity) and aircraft noise exposure. In June 2020, we evaluated the long-term effects, and the impact of a sudden decline in noise exposure during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown, on blood pressure and pulse wave velocity, comparing 74 participants exposed to long-term day-evening-night aircraft noise level >60 dB and 75 unexposed individuals. During the 5-year follow-up, the prevalence of hypertension increased in the exposed (42% versus 59%, P=0.048) but not in the unexposed group. The decline in noise exposure since April 2020 was accompanied with a significant decrease of noise annoyance, 24-hour systolic (121.2 versus 117.9 mm Hg; P=0.034) and diastolic (75.1 versus 72.0 mm Hg; P=0.003) blood pressure, and pulse wave velocity (10.2 versus 8.8 m/s; P=0.001) in the exposed group. Less profound decreases of these parameters were noticed in the unexposed group. Significant between group differences were observed for declines in office and night-time diastolic blood pressure and pulse wave velocity. Importantly, the difference in the reduction of pulse wave velocity between exposed and unexposed participants remained significant after adjustment for covariates (-1.49 versus -0.35 m/s; P=0.017). The observed difference in insomnia prevalence between exposed and unexposed individuals at baseline was no more significant at follow-up. Thus, long-term aircraft noise exposure may increase the prevalence of hypertension and accelerate arterial stiffening. However, even short-term noise reduction, as experienced during the COVID-19 lockdown, may reverse those unfavorable effects.


Subject(s)
Aircraft , Blood Pressure/physiology , COVID-19 , Environmental Exposure , Noise, Transportation/adverse effects , Noise/adverse effects , Quarantine , Vascular Stiffness/physiology , Aged , Arteriosclerosis/epidemiology , Arteriosclerosis/etiology , Female , Harm Reduction , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/etiology , Life Style , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Pulse Wave Analysis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Urban Health
6.
Pregnancy Hypertens ; 26: 17-23, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364411

ABSTRACT

AIMS: The aim of this study was to apply the Mendelian randomization (MR) design to explore the potential causal association between COVID-19 and the risk of hypertension disorders in pregnancy. METHODS: Our primary genetic instrument comprised 8 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with COVID-19 at genome-wide significance. Data on the associations between the SNPs and the risk of hypertension disorders in pregnancy were obtained from study based on a very large cohort of European population. The random-effects inverse-variance weighted method was conducted for the main analyses, with a complementary analysis of the weighted median and MR-Egger approaches. RESULTS: Using IVW, we found that genetically predicted COVID-19 was significantly positively associated with hypertension disorders in pregnancy, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.111 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.042-1.184; P = 0.001]. Weighted median regression also showed directionally similar estimates [OR 1.098 (95% CI, 1.013-1.190), P = 0.023]. Both funnel plots and MR-Egger intercepts suggest no directional pleiotropic effects observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide direct evidence that there is a shared genetic predisposition so that patients infected with COVID-19 may be causally associated with increased risk of hypertension disorders in pregnancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Hypertension/etiology , Mendelian Randomization Analysis/methods , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Risk Assessment/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Global Health , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/genetics , Incidence , Pregnancy , Risk Factors
8.
Eur Heart J ; 42(21): 2085-2087, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284863
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7163, 2021 03 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159799

ABSTRACT

The spread of virus via the blood stream has been suggested to contribute to extra-pulmonary organ failure in Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We assessed SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia (RNAemia) and the association between RNAemia and inflammation, organ failure and mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients. We included all patients with PCR verified COVID-19 and consent admitted to ICU. SARS-CoV-2 RNA copies above 1000/ml measured by PCR in plasma was defined as RNAemia and used as surrogate for viremia. In this cohort of 92 patients 59 (64%) were invasively ventilated. RNAemia was found in 31 patients (34%). Hypertension and corticosteroid treatment was more common in patients with RNAemia. Extra-pulmonary organ failure biomarkers and the extent of organ failure were similar in patients with and without RNAemia, but the former group had more renal replacement therapy and higher mortality (26 vs 16%; 35 vs 16%, respectively, p = 0.04). RNAemia was not an independent predictor of death at 30 days after adjustment for age. SARS-CoV2 RNA copies in plasma is a common finding in ICU patients with COVID-19. Although viremia was not associated with extra pulmonary organ failure it was more common in patients who did not survive to 30 days after ICU admission.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials NCT04316884.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , Viremia/etiology , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/etiology , Interleukin-6/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Prospective Studies , RNA, Viral/blood , Renal Replacement Therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Sweden/epidemiology , Viremia/mortality , Viremia/therapy
11.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(4): 748-764, 2020 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regulation of sodium chloride transport in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron is essential for fluid homeostasis and BP control. The chloride-bicarbonate exchanger pendrin in ß-intercalated cells, along with sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) in distal convoluted tubules, complementarily regulate sodium chloride handling, which is controlled by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. METHODS: Using mice with mineralocorticoid receptor deletion in intercalated cells, we examined the mechanism and roles of pendrin upregulation via mineralocorticoid receptor in two different models of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. We also used aldosterone-treated NCC knockout mice to examine the role of pendrin regulation in salt-sensitive hypertension. RESULTS: Deletion of mineralocorticoid receptor in intercalated cells suppressed the increase in renal pendrin expression induced by either exogenous angiotensin II infusion or endogenous angiotensin II upregulation via salt restriction. When fed a low-salt diet, intercalated cell-specific mineralocorticoid receptor knockout mice with suppression of pendrin upregulation showed BP reduction that was attenuated by compensatory activation of NCC. In contrast, upregulation of pendrin induced by aldosterone excess combined with a high-salt diet was scarcely affected by deletion of mineralocorticoid receptor in intercalated cells, but depended instead on hypokalemic alkalosis through the activated mineralocorticoid receptor-epithelial sodium channel cascade in principal cells. In aldosterone-treated NCC knockout mice showing upregulation of pendrin, potassium supplementation corrected alkalosis and inhibited the pendrin upregulation, thereby lowering BP. CONCLUSIONS: In conjunction with NCC, the two pathways of pendrin upregulation, induced by angiotensin II through mineralocorticoid receptor activation in intercalated cells and by alkalosis through mineralocorticoid receptor activation in principal cells, play important roles in fluid homeostasis during salt depletion and salt-sensitive hypertension mediated by aldosterone excess.


Subject(s)
Hypertension/etiology , Nephrons/metabolism , Nephrons/pathology , Receptors, Mineralocorticoid/physiology , Sodium Chloride Symporters/physiology , Sulfate Transporters/metabolism , Aldosterone , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology
14.
Acta Orthop ; 91(6): 639-643, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748293

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose - Following the outbreak of COVID-19 in December 2019, in China, many hip fracture patients were unable to gain timely admission and surgery. We assessed whether delayed surgery improves hip joint function and reduces major complications better than nonoperative therapy. Patients and methods - In this retrospective observational study, we collected data from 24 different hospitals from January 1, 2020, to July 20, 2020. 145 patients with hip fractures aged 65 years or older were eligible. Clinical data was extracted from electronic medical records. The primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Harris Hip Score. Major complications, including deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pneumonia within 1 month and 3 months, were collected for further analysis. Results - Of the 145 hip fracture patients 108 (median age 72; 70 females) received delayed surgery and 37 (median age 74; 20 females) received nonoperative therapy. The median time from hip fracture injury to surgery was 33 days (IQR 24-48) in the delayed surgery group. Hypertension, in about half of the patients in both groups, and cerebral infarction, in around a quarter of patients in both groups, were the most common comorbidities. Both VAS score and Harris Hip Score were superior in the delayed surgery group. At the 3-month follow-up, the median VAS score was 1 in the delayed surgery group and 2.5 in the nonoperative group (p < 0.001). Also, the percentage of complications was higher in the nonoperative group (p = 0.004 for DVT, p < 0.001 for pulmonary infection). Interpretation - In hip fracture patients, delayed surgery compared with nonoperative therapy significantly improved hip function and reduced various major complications.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Infarction , Conservative Treatment , Fracture Fixation , Hip Fractures , Hypertension , Postoperative Complications , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cerebral Infarction/epidemiology , Cerebral Infarction/etiology , Cerebral Infarction/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Conservative Treatment/adverse effects , Conservative Treatment/methods , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Female , Fracture Fixation/adverse effects , Fracture Fixation/methods , Fracture Fixation/statistics & numerical data , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/etiology , Hypertension/prevention & control , Male , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL